Proving that there's life in It's A Knockout yet, between January 2011 and January 2012 Australian viewers were treated to a revival of the series, produced by Mistral and Ice-TV and broadcast on Channel Ten. In common with 2010's Stedenspel, it was broadcast from one location. However, that location was not even in Australia - instead it was recorded at what was dubbed 'The Knockerdome' in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - and this prompted complaints from Australian viewers who wanted to have a chance to go and see the events live, like in the series heyday in Australia in the mid 1980s.

In fact, the Malaysian location was pretty much forced upon the producers as they discovered that it proved impossible to insure the production and the competitors on Australian soil. A crazy situation which is mitigating against home television production in many countries. Producers also suggested that production costs in Malaysia were more affordable, so off-shore it was.

The competition was played out over eight weeks by four teams - one each from the states of New South Wales (Paramedics), Queensland (Lifesavers) and Victoria (Firefighters) and a fourth team (The Macca's All Stars), which was made up of employees of McDonald's (the programme's main sponsors). The first six weeks saw the teams play each other two at a time. By winning a heat, teams would score a Round Robin point and the two teams with the highest Round Robin score would progress to the Grand Final (Week 8). A third place play-off was held in Week 7 for the remaining two teams.

Unlike Stedenspel, games varied week to week, but even in a short series of eight weeks, the producers were bringing back "old favourites" from earlier in the series by midway through.

The presenters for this new version of It's A Knockout were Australian broadcasting legend H.G. Nelson, Brad McEwan and Charli Robinson, a former member of the band Hi-5.

The series was met with a warm welcome, but ratings fell off quite quickly. Reaction was not particularly good, with most commentators complaining that it failed to capture the magic of the programme upon which it was based. Some questioned the bizarre decision not to have the male presenters interact with the competitors and all told, the verdict was "should have been better".

by Alan Hayes

JSFnetGB Series Guide pages researched by
Alan Hayes, David Hamilton, Neil Storer, Christos Moustakas, Philippe Minet,
Sébastien Dias, Ischa Bijl, Paul Leaver and JSFnet Websites