Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Entrants 1974: Belgium (B) • Switzerland (CH) • West Germany (D) •
France (F) • Great Britain (GB) • Italy (I) • Netherlands (NL) 

Presenters of International Heats / Commentators:
Paule Herreman, Michel Lemaire and Jacques Careuil (RTB - B)
Jan Theys (BRT - B)
Jan Hiermeyer (SRG - CH)
Georges Kleinmann and Christian Defaye (SSR - CH)
Ezio Guidi, Mascia Cantoni (TSI - CH)
Hartmut Brühl, Erhard Keller, Karl-Heinz Wocker and Marie-Louise Steinbauer (ARD-WDR - D)
Guy Lux, Simone Garnier and Claude Savarit (ORTF/A2 - F)
Stuart Hall and Eddie Waring (BBC - GB)
Rosanna Vaudetti and Giulio Marchetti (RAI - I)
Barend Barendse, Dick Passchier and Dik Bikker (NCRV - NL)

International Referees: Gennaro Olivieri, Guido Pancaldi
Referees (BBC): Arthur Ellis (Heats 1-2, 5-7, Final), Mike Swann (Heats 1, 3-4, 6)
and David Ashton (Heat 6)

Collaborator / Assistant Referee:
André Lange

Designer (BBC): Stuart Furber

National Producers:
Pierre Chevreuille, Diane Lange and André Lange (RTB - B)
Jef Savenberg, Lode Hendrickx and Herman Verelst (BRT - B)
Jean-Luc Balmer (SSR - CH)
Marius Berger (SRG - CH)
Sergio Cavaglieri (TSI - CH)
Marita Theile (ARD-WDR - D)
Guy Lux and Claude Savarit (ORTF/A2 - F)
Barney Colehan (BBC - GB)
Luciano Vecchi (RAI - I)
Bernard Prins and Dick Van't Sant (NCRV)

National Directors:
Michel Rochat (RTB - B)
Jean Bovon and Jean-Marie Schorderet (SSR - CH)
Günther Hassert (ARD-WDR - D)
Roger Benamou and Jean Cohen (ORTF / A2 - F)
Bill Taylor (BBC - GB)
Gian Maria Tabarelli (RAI - I)
Matthias Meuser (NCRV - NL)

Produced by RTB-BRT (B), SSR-SRG-TSI (CH), ARD-WDR (D), 
ORTF 2 / ANTENNE 2  (F), BBC North West (GB), RAI (I), NCRV (NL)

 

Key:
International Heats
 
l = Qualified for International Final / l = Heat Winner (Silver Trophy)
International Final
l = Gold Trophy   l = Silver Trophy   l = Bronze Trophy

DST = Daylight Saving Time
(ONLY Great Britain and Italy observed DST)

B

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 1

Event Staged: Tuesday 28th May 1974
Venue: Château de Bouillon, Bouillon, Belgium

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Tuesday 28th May 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
RTB (B): Tuesday 28th May 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
NCRV (NL):
Tuesday 28th May 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 29th May 1974, 8.15-9.40pm
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 29th May 1974, 8.15-10.25pm
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 29th May 1974, 9.00-10.20pm
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 29th May 1974, 9.05-10.30pm
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 30th May 1974
ORTF 2 (F):
Saturday 20th July 1974 (2nd)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 2nd August 1974, 7.55-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Dr. Michel Stecker, Mayor of Bouillon

Theme: The Crusades of Godfrey of Bouillon

Teams: Bouillon (B) v. Ilanz (CH) v. Rosenheim (D) v. Briey (F) v.
Southport (GB) v. Cerveteri (I) v. Wierden (NL)

Team Members included:
Ilanz (CH) -
Bruno Alpergos, Peter Feller;
Rosenheim (D) - Richard Horner (Team Trainer), Reinhard Gellart, Kristof Kopf, Peter Rochof, Peter Wiesner;
Southport (GB) - Harry Boyle (Team Coach), Charles Buxton (Team Captain), Sheila Brookfield, Mike Dolman, Gina Forrigno, Helen Jenkins, Ian Jenkins, Shirley Rodwell, Kevin Stringfellow, Chris Whittle;
Cerveteri (I) - Roberto Caladorio;
Wierden (NL) - Emile Hooderik.

Games: Depart for the Crusades, The Knights' Training, The Knights' Heads, Crossing the Ford, The Theft of the Relics, The Battering Ram, Mining the Tunnel, and Return from the Crusades;
Fil Rouge: A Kiss from the Sultana;
Jokers: Animated Mounted Knights.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 2 2 10 4 3 1 --- 6 7

CH

--- 6 6 5 5 6 1 6 3

D

3 --- 6 6 6 2 12 7 5
F 4 2 --- 2 3 4 3 3 2

GB

10 6 1 --- 1 3 1 1 1
I 12 6 3 1 --- 5 6 4 6
NL 1 3 8 3 4 --- 4 2 4
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 2 4 14 18 21 22 22 28 35

CH

0 6 12 17 22 28 29 35 38

D

3 3 9 15 21 23 35 42 47
F 4 6 6 8 11 15 18 21 23

GB

10 16 17 17 18 21 22 23 24
I 12 18 21 22 22 27 33 37 43
NL 1 4 12 15 19 19 23 25 29

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

 D • Rosenheim l l
 I • Cerveteri
 CH • Ilanz
 B • Bouillon
 NL • Wierden
 GB • Southport
 F • Briey

47
43
38
35
29
24
23

The Venue

Bouillon, Belgium

This heat was held at the medieval castle in Bouillon, which was built in the latter part of the 10th century. The castle is situated on a rocky spur on a sharp bend of the River Semois. Around 1080, the castle was inherited by Godfrey of Bouillon who sold it to Otbert, Prince-Bishop of Liège (with the option of a buy-back within three years) in 1096 in order that he could finance the First Crusade. It was not until the latter part of the 17th century that the castle was fitted with heavy artillery. Although the playing arena was within the grounds of the castle, due to its construction, size and design, the games were played within different sections of the castle walls in very cramped conditions, as opposed to the normal single arena.

The Games in Detail

Game 3 - The Knights' Heads

As with a similar occurrence in 1967, Game 3 - ‘The Knights’ Heads’ - was witness to a timing error which robbed the Dutch team of Wierden of 2pts, and gave the home team Bouillon an additional 2pts. Both teams had played their Joker on this game and on the transmission it is clear that the Dutch team completed a flawless game and finished two seconds ahead of the Belgian team. However when the results were announced, the Belgians were given a time of one second faster than the Dutch. Although this error would not have affected the final result or any qualification criteria for the International Final, if this refereeing error had been noticed, the master scoreboard would have read:

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th

6th
7th

 D • Rosenheim
 I • Cerveteri
 CH • Ilanz
 B • Bouillon
 NL • Wierden

 GB • Southport
 F • Briey

47
43
38
33
31

24
23

 

Fil Rouge - A Kiss from the Sultana

Although the Fil Rouge was entitled ‘A Kiss from the Sultana’, none of the competitors completed the game in order for the sultana to be kissed!

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

At the start of this programme Belgian presenter Michel Lemaire introduced referees Gennaro Olivieri and Guido Pancaldi to the series in their new attire. Ardent viewers may have thought that their attire was the same each year, but only the eagle-eyed would have noticed that it had changed slightly over the years especially since the inception of colour in 1970. That year the pair of them was attired in brown jackets, beige trousers and light-blue polo-neck vests. In 1971 they wore blue jackets, beige trousers and beige floral shirts. The 1972 and 1973 series saw them wearing blue suits with beige polo-neck vests, whereas this year they wore the reverse - beige suits with blue polo-neck vests!

Additional Information

The British team of Southport had a disastrous night in Bouillon. Having already been crowned British champions and awarded the Radio Times Trophy as the highest scoring British team in the Domestic series, the team started well by scoring 16pts on the first two games. However that was as good as it got, because from that moment on the team finished last on five of the other six games they played and could only manage a 5th place on the remaining game!

At the other end of the scale, the West German team of Rosenheim had scored only 3pts after two games but then won five out of the next six games they played. This gave them a 5pt lead ahead of Italian team of Cerveteri before the final game.

The scoreboard malfunctioned at this heat and the scores for the Belgian team of Bouillon and French team of Briey did not update correctly after the points were awarded after the final game. After winning the final game the score for Bouillon should have been 35 pts but the '3' of the '35' blipped out of existence and showed Bouillon's result as being just 5 pts. The French team’s score should have been 23 but again the ‘3’ failed to show. However, unlike the Belgian score the ‘3’ eventually appeared to show the correct score. We have corrected this error for the scoreboard shown above.

For some unknown reason, as with the Belgian International Heat from Spa in 1972, the music played over the end credits at this heat was that from the 1967 series of the programme!

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

NL

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 2

Event Staged: Wednesday 12th June 1974
Venue: Circuit van Zandvoort (Zandvoort Circuit), Zandvoort, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)

NCRV (NL): Wednesday 12th June 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 13th June 1974
ORTF 2 (F):
Saturday 13th July 1974 (1st)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 9th August 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Dick Passchier

Theme: Trades and Occupations

Teams: Eeklo (B) v. Lugano (CH) v. Bad Bentheim (D) v. Aurillac (F) v.
Warwick (GB) v. Mondello (Sicilia) (I) v. Zandvoort (NL)

Team Members included:
Bad Bentheim (D) -
Gerhard Hendricks, Orta Hilner and Gerhard Mückenheim;
Warwick (GB) - Arthur Harrison (Team Coach), Steven Amos, Leslie Barnett, Michael Day, Bryan Fraser, Robert Gibbs, Linda Robinson, Linda Shaw, Pat Stevens, Bill Stone, Paul Tallis, Susan Whyford.

Games: The Brewers, The Bakers, The Astronauts, The Removal Men, The Mathematics Students, The Matchbox Sellers, The Waiters and the Waitress and The Train Drivers;
Fil Rouge: The Zoo Keepers;
Jokers: Giant Dutch Tulips.

Game Results and Standingss

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B --- 1 6 5 1 4 2 6 3

CH

4 --- 4 3 1 2 1 6 2

D

5 2 --- 12 1 3 6 3 4
F 6 3 5 --- 2 1 4 6 7

GB

3 4 6 4 --- 6 6 3 5
I 1 5 12 2 6 --- 3 3 1
NL 4 6 1 1 10 5 --- 7 6
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 0 1 7 12 13 17 19 25 28

CH

4 4 8 11 12 14 15 21 23

D

5 7 7 19 20 23 29 32 36
F 6 9 14 14 16 17 21 27 34

GB

3 7 13 17 17 23 29 32 37
I 1 6 18 20 26 26 29 32 33
NL 4 10 11 12 22 27 27 34 40

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

 NL • Zandvoort l l
 GB • Warwick
 D • Bad Bentheim
 F • Aurillac
 I • Mondello (Sicilia)
 B • Eeklo
 CH • Lugano

40
37
36
34
33
28
23

The Venue

Zandvoort, Netherlands

This heat was held at the Dutch Grand Prix racing track at Zandvoort which was inaugurated on 7th August 1948. In 1949, the first Dutch Grand Prix was held on the track, but the first Formula One race which counted towards World Championship points was not held there until 1955. The Dutch Grand Prix continued to be held on the track until 1985 when it was held for the final time. The only exception being in 1972 when the owners - Zandvoort City Council - no longer wanted to put up the money necessary to modernise the track and make it safe. On 7th February 1973, a 15-year lease was signed between the city council and new operators CENAV B.V. Crash barriers were built around the entire race track, and at the back of the circuit a speed control section called the Panoramabocht was laid. New pits and VIP rooms were also created. The total cost for this development was over 3 million guilders (approx. £375,000). The closure of the track in 1985 (three years earlier than the end of the lease) was caused in the main by the fact that a number of problems made it impossible to develop or upgrade. The most important being noise pollution to the locals who lived in Zandvoort closest to the track. In order to try and solve this, the management developed a plan to move the southern-most part of the track away from the residential area. In January 1987, this plan got the green-light (excuse the pun). However by the April of the same year, CENAV went into liquidation following accusations of cost-cutting with safety measures, and the receivers were called in. This marked the end of Circuit van Zandvoort. The track was handed over to the local Zandvoort council and was in danger of being permanently lost for motor-sports. However within a few months, a new operating company Stichting Exploitatie Circuit Park (Circuit Park Operating Foundation) was formed and it started talks with the local councillors about the realisation of the track’s potential. In the summer of 1989, Circuit Park Zandvoort was born and was remodelled into a slightly smaller 2.6 km (1.5 miles) track, whilst the old southern park of the track was used to build a bungalow park and new local soccer and hockey clubs.

The Games in Detail

Game 3 - The Astronauts

The third game - ‘The Astronauts’ - was quite an unusual game and it involved one of the programme’s specialities - the carousel. However, it was unique in the fact that the carousel was human-powered. The idea of the game was that a male and female representative from each team, dressed as astronauts, were sitting opposite each other on a carousel shaped like a flying saucer set at an angle of about 30° to the ground. On the whistle, using only gravity, the competitor at the top would lean to his left and stretch backwards whilst the upward competitor would lean as far forward as possible. On reaching the bottom, the competitor then had to change to the forward position whilst the competitor now at the top had to lean left and stretch backwards. This produced enough gravitational energy to get the carousel moving and as they continued to repeat the game the speed increased. To achieve a score the male astronaut had to hit a target behind him as he passed the top of the carousel. The quickest time to achieve ten targets won the game. The Dutch team protested that there was a fault with their spaceship because it did not rotate properly, although it had been used to great effect by the Italian team in the previous heat of the game. On watching the transmission, it is clear that the Dutch competitors got somewhat confused with the posture which they should hold on the up and downward runs of the game, and this ultimately slowed them down and at one point the carousel stopped completely.


Game 4 - The Removal Men

The fourth game - ‘The Removal Men’ - saw the British team of Warwick struggle at the beginning but make a very good comeback. On the whistle, the teams had to push large barge shaped trolleys containing furniture up a course and, using a rope and pulley, they had to lift it to the fourth floor of a typical Dutch city house. The West German commentator made an amusing reference to ‘drunken sailors’ when the British team were unable to steer a straight course with the trolley and encroached on the Swiss team’s lane. With both of the other teams in their heat of the game now well ahead it took some quick-thinking on the team's part to get the five pieces of furniture - a piano, an armchair, a bicycle, a standard floor lamp and a national flag - up to the top of the building. Whilst the other five teams did it in four lifts - first the piano, followed by the armchair and then by the bicycle and lamp together and finally the flag, which then had to be placed in a holder - the British team cut some corners and sent the armchair with the bike and the lamp on the same lift. This enabled the team to catch up and finish in third place on the game.

Additional Information

At the start of the programme Dutch racing driver Rob Slotemakers staged a spectacular entrance. He drove into the arena from the Grand Prix track at about 60 mph, and just a few metres short of a marked area, he spun the car around 180° and brought it to a dead stop. The front doors opened and out stepped presenter Dick Passchier and Rob Slotemakers followed by referees Gennaro Olivieri and Guido Pancaldi from the rear seats. Dick was not shaken by the experience. He just looked at the cameras and welcomed everyone to the programme and introduced Rob to the camera. The stunt had obviously been well rehearsed as there were at least 10 sets of skid marks from the tyres visible on the tarmac. Slotemakers would go on to found an anti-skid school display team, but in a tragic twist, it was on this same track that he lost his life, after breaking his neck in a car crash on 1st July 1979.

Whilst the majority of this heat, in common with most Dutch International Heats, was played out to the sounds of a genuine barrel organ, the Fil Rouge (or Rode Draad in Dutch) featured the musical accompaniment of one of Zandvoort’s local amateur bands, De Kwallentrappers. Their name translates into English as The Jellyfish Catchers!

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

I

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 3

Event Staged: Wednesday 10th July 1974
Venue: Comunale Stadio di Giovanni Moscardini (Municipal Stadium of Johnny Moscardini),
Barga, Italy

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.15pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)

NCRV (NL): Wednesday 10th July 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 11th July 1974
ORTF 2 (F):
Saturday 27th July 1974 (3rd)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 16th August 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Giulio Marchetti

Theme: The Circus

Teams: Edegem (B) v. Gossau (CH) v. Singen (D) v. Nancy (F) v.
Rotherham (GB) v. Barga (I) v. Andijk (NL)

Team Members included:
Gossau (CH) -
Eugen Krapf (Team Manager), Elsbet Aemisegger, Max Bont, Kurt Beck, Ruedi Beck, Claire Eckmann, Hugo Eugster, Markus Hitz, Maria Huber, Vreni Letzer, Gabi Messmer, Kurt Müggler, Paul Nobel, Walter Rombach, August Stolz;
Singen (D) - Brigina Densel, Erhard Fischer, Frank Fischer, Thomas Fulmarr, Heinz Gerstner, Peter Muehler, Erved Ruiz, Peter Strümeyer, Waltreise Wergens;
Nancy (F) -
Dominique Herbinet (Team Captain), Geneviève Serreau (Ladies' Captain), Thierry Dabrowski, Jean-Pierre Desquatre, Patrick Dubois, Marcel Desbuis, Philippe Genin, Marie-Lyse Jacquiert, Noëlle Jarry, François Lombard, Josette Lombard, Christian Ries, André Rotta and Catherine Spettel (13);
Rotherham (GB) - John Bideford (Men’s Team Captain), Susanne Jones (Ladies’ Team Captain), Eileen Baker, Sandra Beasley, Keith Brown, Marion Brownett, Vivienne Burns, Peter Coulton, David Crutchley, Lynne Dalton, Malcolm Daltry, Pamela Elliott, H. Evans, Len Evans, Ian Ferguson, Anne Fitzgerald, Carole Fletcher, Bill Green, Christine Green, Brian Harney, Kathryn Harrison, Susan Hibbert, Peter Hunt, Susan Hunt, Lynne Hutton, John Jones, Karen Maplebeck, David O'Hara, Brian Pearson, Mary Pearson, Glen Pine, Lyn Sergeant, Richard Shaw, Alan Simpson, Gerard Tyler, Victor Tyler, Stephen Webb, Granville Wild, J. Winchcombe, Joy Wooller;
Barga (I) -
Raffaello Bernardini, Remo Bertoncini, Leonardo Corradini, Enrico Cosimini, Piero del Checcolo, Gianluca Donnini, Oliviero Galeotti, Katia Gonnella, Silvia Lucchesi, Pietro Mucci, Donata Piacentini and Gianluca Tonarelli;
Andijk (NL) - Joacha van Guslicher.

Games: Horses and Scholars, The Tightrope Walker, In the Jaws of the Lion, Catapulting the Bears, Acrobatic Horse Riders, The Strongmen, The Human Cannonball and Clowns and Balls;
Fil Rouge: The Trapeze Artiste;
Jokers: Jack-in-the-Boxes

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 5 --- 1 2 2 2 6 7 2

CH

2 4 --- 4 5 12 3 3 1

D

4 5 1 --- 12 5 1 5 3
F 12 3 1 6 --- 4 4 7 7

GB

1 3 1 3 8 --- 5 3 4
I 3 6 6 5 3 4 --- 5 6
NL --- 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 5
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 5 5 6 8 10 12 18 25 27

CH

2 6 6 10 15 27 30 33 34

D

4 9 10 10 22 27 28 33 36
F 12 15 16 22 22 26 30 37 44

GB

1 4 5 8 16 16 21 24 28
I 3 9 15 20 23 27 27 32 38
NL 0 1 3 4 5 8 10 11 16

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

 F • Nancy l l
 I • Barga
 D • Singen
 CH • Gossau
 GB • Rotherham
 B • Edegem
 NL • Andijk

44
38
36
34
28
27
16

The Venue

Barga, Italy

The venue for this heat in Barga was the Comunale Stadio di Giovanni Moscardini which was named in honour of the only Scottish-born footballer ever to play for Italy. Giovanni ‘Johnny’ Moscardini was born in Falkirk in 1897 to Italian parents who had moved to Scotland to set up fish and chip shops and ice-cream parlours. During World War I, Giovanni's loyalties were tested when he went to fight for Italy. After the war, he returned to his family home in Barga where he played football for the local team AS Barga (Associazione Sportiva Barga). He was subsequently spotted by a talent scout from Luchesse, located in Tuscany and he eventually went on to play for Pisa and Genoa as well as the national team. Today, the stadium is past its glory days and the athletics track that once surrounded the football pitch is long gone. Despite its deteriorated appearance today, it remains the home of the local club and still bears the name of the town’s greatest ever football player.

The Games in Detail

Game 4 - Catapulting the Bears

Game 4 - ‘Catapulting the Bears’ - ended in controversy when the British team were told that they had to have a second try at the game after their ‘bear’ hit the watching crowd and bounced back into the playing area. The idea of the game was that two male team members dressed as clowns had to walk down a small course on top of a roller. At the end of the course was an inflatable bear with a weighted base located in a holder on one end of a catapult. The contestants then had to push down on their end of the catapult to send the bear flying over their heads and back down the course. However, during the second round of the game, the British bear hit a member of the crowd, which had clearly been allowed to get far too close to the games, and the bear rebounded back up the course. The referees decided that because they could not record the point at which the bear had landed, the team would have to be given another go. On the re-run the British girl accidentally touched the bear whilst the boys were preparing to push down and the bear fell from the holder and on the course just in front of the roller. Despite protests from the team, the referees declared that the attempt was good and scored them as finishing in fourth place on the game!


Fil Rouge - The Trapeze Artiste

The Fil Rouge featured large foam rubber versions of the animated characters featured in the opening credits of the programme, and like Game 4, it too was subject to some controversy. The idea was straightforward in that one of these characters was attached by a hook to a large swing, which had to be animated by two pullers. At a chosen time, a girl team-mate released it from its hook by an electronic switch, and with gravity and kinetic energy it fell into one of seven sections of a box below. The sections were marked 1pt, 3pts, 5pts, 7pts, 5pts, 3pts and 1pt with a 10pts container in the middle of the 7pts section. After the first attempt the foam-rubber character remained in the section it had fallen, and the team had a second try. If the second one hit the first character and bounced into a lower scoring points section or out of the box completely then that would be the score accepted. The Dutch and the Belgian teams went without any problem, but the Swiss team’s second attempt bounced out of the box after hitting their original try and they were awarded 0pts. The West Germans went next, and again the second attempt bounced off the original try, but they were fortunate that it bounced back into a lower-scoring section. However after the French team’s first attempt, there was a problem with the hook of the second character,and they retrieved the original one and used that on the second attempt. This seemed a bit unfair on the previous teams as they had been hindered by their original character ‘blocking’ the box that it had fallen in, with the chance of the bounce-out. Both of the final two teams to participate in the Fil Rouge were also given this privilege, but before the British team’s second attempt Gennaro Olivieri stated that the Swiss team would be awarded an extra 3pts because that would have been the score of their character if it had not bounced out. Although Belgium had used the two characters, their score had not been affected by this. In the end, despite protests from their team captain before each subsequent run of the Fil Rouge, the West Germans had been hindered in a way the other six hadn’t. This had clearly robbed them of 2pts which would have given them 38pts and a tied second place with Italy.

Additional Information

Jeux Sans Frontières took a summer break of four weeks between heats as the FIFA Football World Cup was held in West Germany between 13th June and 7th July 1974. The break allowed broadcasters to carry live coverage of matches and free up technical, administrative and presentation staff and resources for the football tournament.

Although unofficially celebrated, this was the 100th programme staged under the Jeux Sans Frontières name. This number comprised 19 Winter programmes (16 Heats and 3 Finals), 77 Summer programmes (64 Heats, 4 Semi-Finals and 9 Finals) and 4 Christmas programmes.

The venue for this International Heat was originally intended to be the city of Viareggio on Italy’s west coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. It's A Knockout programmes in Great Britain displayed Viareggio as the Italian destination throughout the Domestic Series. It was not until 1st June 1974 - four days after the first International Heat had been held in Bouillon, Belgium - that the BBC were informed by RAI Television of the change of venue. French broadcaster ORTF informed the team management of Nancy of the last minute selection of Barga at around the same time.

The Swiss team of Gossau were originally scheduled to travel to the British heat at Northampton, due to be held on Wednesday 21st August 1974. However, the town's mayor, Jacques Bossart, was of the opinion that the team should not go there as he could not speak English. After negotiations with the Swiss TV producers, the team's destination was rearranged, so that they instead went to the Italian heat - which at that time was planned to be staged in Viareggio rather than Barga.

The Gossau team brought along with them 78 small Treichels (cowbells) to give to each of the other competitors. Mayor Bossart had originally wanted the squad to take along small glass coat-of-arms as gifts but team manager Eugen Krapf refused, stating that he was sure that there would simply been a pile of glass remaining if they had done so.

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

CH

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 4

Event Staged: Wednesday 24th July 1974
Venue: Roman Amphitheatre, Avenches, Switzerland

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)

NCRV (NL): Wednesday 24th July 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 25th July 1974
ORTF 2 (F):
Saturday 3rd August 1974 (4th)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 23rd August 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: The Descending Lion (see Did You Know, below)

Theme: The Romans

Teams: Vilvoorde (B) v. Avenches (CH) v. Bad Urach (D) v. Le Touquet (F) v.
Farnham (GB) v. Acqui-Terme (I) v. Mill (NL)

Team Members included:
Farnham (GB) -
James Wilson (Team Manager), Robert Bradley (Team Coach), William Allen, Yvonne Andrews, Gareth Angel, Christopher Bonner, Judy Comber, Ian Carter, Andrew Christmas, Geoffrey Clark, David ‘Scotty’ Colston, Helen Cooper, Valerie Cooper, Richard Curtis, Barrie Dinsdale, John Dinsdale, Janice Farry, Nicholas De Meric, Barbara Freeman, Pamela Gale, Jefferson Green, Peter Grenham, Lynne Hammett, Sara Hatcher, Felicity Hayes, Ian Hiscock, Glynis Hughes, Jean McLeod, Andrew McSherry, Keith Maisey, Keith Morris, Keith Mortimer, Hugh Osborne, Robert Osbourne, Gillian Parry, Sandra Parsons, Ian Powell, Jeanette Quay, Brian Roberts, Jill Simpson, Kenneth Smith, Margaret Smith, Dino Timms, Susan Tunnicliffe, Andrew Tutt, Michael Vernon, Ronald Wallis, Barry Welch, Susan Wheeler, Sarah Wickins, Martin Wilkes, Ray Woodstock and Robert Young.

Games: The Roman Gladiators, The Ammunition Chutes, Destructive Elephants, The Catapults and Shields, Slingshot Dice Throw, The Strongman’s Table, The Unicorns and The Statues of Caesar;
Fil Rouge: The Descending Lion;
Jokers: Flaming Torches.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 2 1 1 3 12 --- 1 7 7

CH

5 6 3 3 8 2 --- 1 6

D

--- 1 10 6 1 6 3 4 1
F 4 --- 2 3 2 6 12 2 3

GB

12 5 --- 5 3 3 5 5 2
I 1 1 12 --- 5 6 4 6 5
NL 3 4 4 8 --- 2 2 3 4
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 2 3 4 7 19 19 20 27 34

CH

5 11 14 17 25 27 27 28 34

D

0 1 11 17 18 24 27 31 32
F 4 4 6 9 11 17 29 31 34

GB

12 17 17 22 25 28 33 38 40
I 1 2 14 14 19 25 29 35 40
NL 3 7 11 19 19 21 23 26 30

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
1st

3rd
3rd
3rd
6th
7th

 GB • Farnham l l
 I • Acqui-Terme
l
 B • Vilvoorde
l
 CH • Avenches
 F  • Le Touquet
 D • Bad Urach
 NL • Mill

40
40

34
34
34
32
30

The Venue

Avenches, Switzerland

This heat in Avenches was held in one of the smallest arenas ever to host a Jeux Sans Frontières programme. Coming close to rivalling the small quayside venue at Nice in France in 1972, six of the games had to be held in the same section of the amphitheatre, whilst the Fil Rouge was built on part of the western seating area and the other two games were held adjacent to that. The commentary boxes occupied the whole of the eastern side of the seating area, and the master scoreboard was actually situated outside the amphitheatre above the spectators!

The Games in Detail

Fil Rouge - The Descending Lion

Before the start of the fourth round of the Fil Rouge, Gennaro Olivieri explained that due to the very inclement conditions, communication between himself and the national judges had broken down whilst being given the times for the second game. After checking their score-pads the judges had realised that the points awarded on that game were incorrect. He then went on to explain that due to this, there needed to be an adjustment of points for three of the teams. The Italians who had originally been placed in joint second place were promoted to first place and were awarded an additional 2pts (having played their Joker). The West Germans who had previously been awarded first place were demoted to second place and had 2pts taken off their score (they too had played their Joker). The Netherlands originally in joint second place were then demoted to third place and had 1pt removed from their score. This was the first and only time in the history of the programme, that scores or points awarded had been changed after the following two games had already been played.


Game 8 - The Statues of Caesar

British fans at the venue and the team became a little anxious on the final game - 'The Statues of Caesar'. Leading the Italians by three points before the game, the team had to finish in the first four places to guarantee victory or had to beat the Italian team by three places on the game. The game involved an inclined roof and statues of Caesar had to be pushed as far down it as possible without falling off the end. However if no statues had fallen off, the team that had moved down the incline the smallest distance would then be eliminated instead. All was well for the British after the first run, but disaster struck on the next run when the British competitor failed to push hard enough and was eliminated. This now meant that the team were five points ahead of the Italians, and they had to watch and wait to see if the Italians would falter. They survived the next two rounds and it meant that in order for the British to win, the Italians would have to be eliminated on the fifth run. On the whistle the Italians held back from pushing, but despite this tactic the team travelled the least and were eliminated, securing victory for themselves and the British team.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

At the start of the programme, Swiss presenter Christian Defaye explained that as well as the normal countries, this Jeux Sans Frontières heat was also being transmitted to viewers in Yugoslavia, Turkey, Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia.

Additional Information

This was an exciting night for British viewers after Farnham, having played and won their Joker on the very first game (the only game they won on the night), led the competition throughout the programme.

As was the norm the Fil Rouge, times and scores were displayed on a blackboard. However in keeping with the theme of this heat, the producers used a parchment-shaped blackboard. The torrential rain throughout the programme caused the scores to be obliterated from it and the referees had to re-write the scores on it on numerous occasions. By the end of the programme, the sandy base of the amphitheatre had become completely waterlogged and was awash with large puddles.

The trophy for the winners (with the exception of the International Final, only one trophy was ever brought to each venue) was presented in a unique way and for the first time by a non-human. After the winners were announced, both teams were asked to stand on the podium above the pool which had been used by the competitors of the Fil Rouge. The lion then began its descent with the trophy in its mouth, but as it reached the end of its track it came to an abrupt halt and the trophy fell into the pool below, and Swiss presenter Christian Defaye quickly asked competitors to retrieve it!

This was the last Jeux Sans Frontières programme to be broadcast in France by ORTF (Office de Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française) due to the network being split into separate entities. As from the following heat, the programme was broadcast on the newly-created A2 (Antenne 2) channel, although the opening credits for the remainder of the series continued to show ORTF.

The Dutch team from Mill were the highest scoring team in their Domestic series Zeskamp, and the team were crowned Dutch Champions for 1974.

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

F

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 5

Event Staged: Wednesday 7th August 1974
Venue: Piscine et Parc de Daniel Rops (Swimming Pool and Daniel Rops Park),
Rive de Lac du Bourget (Shore of Lake Bourget), Aix-les-Bains, France

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)

NCRV (NL): Wednesday 7th August 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 8th August 1974
A2 (F):
Saturday 10th August 1974 (5th)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 30th August 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Simone Garnier

Theme: Carnival of the Animals

Teams: Overpelt (B) v. Muralto (CH) v. Wasseralfingen (D) v. Aix-les-Bains (F) v.
Skegness (GB) v. Fabriano (I) v. Harlingen (NL)

Team Members included:
Skegness (GB) -
Rick Swift (Team Manager), Brian Marshall (Team Coach), Betty Grave (Assistant Coach), Mick Devey, Angeline Evison, John Epton, Dorothy Epton, Kathleen Elliott, Bryn Foxon, Stanley Fountain, Barry Fletcher, Kenny Graham, Bryan Johnston, Kathryn Jenkins, Ian Jenkins, Doug Knowles, Steven Ladds, Peter Linton, Lynne Muggeson, Walter Maddison, Alan Mitch, Wendy Pilcher, Jean Marshall, Alison Pollock, Jean Paton, Philip Mason, Christopher Peacock, David Palethorpe, Lynette Sellers, Norman Stanley, David Smith, Evelyn Smith, Paul Strzelecki, Philip Vere and John Willoughby;
Fabriano (I) - Pina Stroppa;
Harlingen (NL) - Jan Bergmans, Lies Bijlsma, Gerrit Bontes, Siep Brouwer, Hilleke Dalmijn, Douwe de Vries, Tjalling Dijkstra, Eef Gerstel, Ria Heeres, Wietske Hoekstra, Els Post, Annie Roorda, Joop van der Heide, Cobi van Grootveld, Jacob Vlieger and Siete Wouters.

Games: Performing Bears, Charging Rhinoceros, Monkeys and Coconuts, Race of the Swans, Penguins on the Iceberg, Boxing Kangaroos, Thieving Squirrels and The Giant Snails;
Fil Rouge: The Tortoise and the Hare;
Jokers: National Animals.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 3 5 2 --- 4 2 2 2 7

CH

4 1 5 2 --- 1 4 3 4

D

6 6 1 6 1 --- 5 6 6
F 1 4 4 6 5 6 --- 7 1

GB

--- 2 3 2 2 3 12 5 1
I 2 --- 6 10 3 4 3 4 3
NL 5 6 --- 8 6 5 2 1 5
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 3 8 10 10 14 16 18 20 27

CH

4 5 10 12 12 13 17 20 24

D

6 12 13 19 20 20 25 31 37
F 1 5 9 15 20 26 26 33 34

GB

0 2 5 7 9 12 24 29 30
I 2 2 8 18 21 25 28 32 35
NL 5 11 11 19 25 30 32 33 38

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

 NL • Harlingen l
 D • Wasseralfingen
 I • Fabriano
 F • Aix-les-Bains
 GB • Skegness
 B • Overpelt
 CH • Muralto

38
37
35
34
30
27
24

The Venue

Aix-les-Bains, France

This heat in Aix-les-Bains was held in the open-air swimming pool and a small park located on the shore of Lake Bourget, the deepest lake in France. Situated alongside the road named after him, the park is dedicated to Daniel Rops, a French writer and historian who died in Aix-les-Bains in 1965.

The Rehearsals

It would appear that the dress rehearsal the previous evening had also been closely fought and low-scoring as the actual programme. The British team of Skegness had finished in second place with 35 pts whilst home team Aix-les-Bains won the rehearsal with just 37 pts.

The Games in Detail

Game 5 - Penguins on the Iceberg

This heat featured the famous ‘Penguins on the Iceberg’ - the fifth game on the night - which has featured in virtually every highlights programme since and simply has to be seen complete with Stuart Hall commentary where the BBC presenter is barely able to speak for laughing. The game was quite simple and it involved male competitors in penguin costumes on a revolving carousel having to collect water in buckets, then passing the buckets to girl team-mates to pour into large cylinders. British team member Dougie Knowles, a 22-year old council refuse collector back in Skegness quite literally spent more time running than he actually did collecting water. He was unfortunate at one time to have fallen over the Belgian penguin and lost all his collected water, and then the West German competitor fell on top of him and squashed his bucket. Whilst all the hilarity was going on the Dutch team miraculously collected 65cm of water, whilst the next best was just 20cm by the home team. However, although Dougie only collected 11cm of water, he did not finish in last place on the game, because the West German competitor could only manage to collect a meagre 1cm of water!


Fil Rouge - The Tortoise and the Hare

The fourth round of the Fil Rouge saw the Belgian team trying to flaunt the rules of the game, but they were caught out by the speed at which they completed the game. The game was based on the Aesop fable The Tortoise and the Hare. The game involved two forms of scoring - a time for the tortoise to complete the course added to the one taken by the hare. The hare’s task was quite simple in that he had to run up a course of moving conveyor belts three times and hand over a carrot to a female team-mate on each run. The tortoise however had a much harder task and that was to carry a girl on his back along a notched rail. In order to do this he played the game inside the shell lying on his stomach with his feet raised and his face towards the start of the game. His only means of propulsion was by using his hands to push his body back thus moving the tortoise forward. The three teams in the previous rounds had found it quite difficult to move the tortoise, but still completed the course in reasonable times. However, the Belgium tortoise moved so fast that it seemed as if it was being propelled by a rocket. Presenter Simone Garnier drew attention to the fact by stating "Look at the tortoise, how fast he moves," but when referee Gennaro Olivieri announced the result, he stated that the competitor had not abided by the rules and had actually used his feet instead of his hands and therefore he would be awarded the maximum time for the run. But even with the maximum time for the tortoise, the team’s overall total was still better than the combined times of the Dutch team that had played previously!


Game 8 - The Giant Snails

Before the last game, the French team of Aix-les-Bains and the Dutch team of Harlingen were equal on 33pts, Italy had 32pts and West Germany 31pts. The final game - ‘The Giant Snails’ - involved seven male team members heavily costumed as giant snails waiting to negotiate a steep incline. To help them climb the slope, each ‘snail’ had a wooden pole which could be slotted into notched rails on the course, allowing them to pull themselves up notch-by-notch. However, the competitors had to be careful because each pole was only 4cm longer than the gaps of the notches on either side of the course and if they tried to climb too fast they could miss their holdings. Belgium, Switzerland and West Germany all got off to a cracking start and were making a mockery of the game. The Swiss ‘snail’ then began to slow down and it was a clear race between the other two. The Belgian summoned all his strength to pull himself up to the final notch to win the game. He was closely followed by the West German competitor. The French in the meantime had overtaken the Swiss and were almost at the top, but as they were just two notches away from the end of the course, their competitor lost his grip on the pole and came sliding down the slope to a hail of sighs from the home crowd. This mistake ultimately cost the Aix-les-Bains team victory on the night, as it allowed the Dutch team to finish the game in 3rd place and to win the heat trophy. In fact, before the final game, any one of the teams who ultimately finished in the first five places on the night could have won this International Heat - and that included Great Britain!

Additional Information

The Jokers in this heat were all based on the animals used as national representative of the countries, and was only the second time that all countries had displayed a different Joker (the first being at Spa in Belgium during the 1972 series). Six of the animals had already been used in the opening credits of the 1967 and 1968 series of the programme - a lion (Belgium), a bear (Switzerland), an eagle (West Germany), a chicken (France), a bulldog (Great Britain) and a wolf (Italy) - the only new addition was a cow (Netherlands).

Despite the teams from West Germany, France, Italy and the Netherlands all being evenly matched in this heat, none of them won their Joker game. In fact, the only team to do so were the British team of Skegness!

This was the first Jeux Sans Frontières programme to be broadcast in France by the newly-created A2 (Antenne 2) channel, following the split of ORTF (Office de Radiodiffusion-Télévision Française) into separate entities. Although the programme was broadcast on the new channel, the opening credits for the remainer of the series continued to show ORTF, but were updated for the new series for 1975.

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

GB

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 6

Event Staged: Wednesday 21st August 1974
Venue: The Old King's Racecourse, Kingsley Park, Northampton, Great Britain

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
NCRV (NL): Wednesday 21st August 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Wednesday 21st August 1974, 10.05-11.30pm (Live - DST)

A2 (F): Thursday 5th September 1974 (6th)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 6th September 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Brian Cowgill, Controller of BBC1

Theme: The Wild West

Teams: Angleur (B) v. Muotathal (CH) v. Kempten im Allgäu (D) v.
Lunéville
(F) v. Rugby (GB) v. Gaeta (I) v. Anloo (NL)

Team Members included:
Angleur (B) -
Vincent Labrique;
Muotathal (CH) - Peter Schelbert;
Kempten im Allgäu (D) - Robin Anschleißen, Peter Holsberger, Reuber Krepen, Angilica Spartel and Helmut Vachter;
Lunéville (F) - Anita Mattiss, Alain Spotleirer, Eric Spotleirer;
Rugby (GB) -
Derek Dolphin (Team Manager), Bob Trenholme (Team Coach), Chris Aldous, Kristine Ash, Margaret Baker, Ashley Bartlett, Jean Beards, Barry Booth, Dawn Branston, Dawn Brown, George Buss, Linda Carter, David Cooke, Mandy Davis, Simon Davis, Ann Denny, Rajenda Desai, Richard Ellis, Keith Foster, Mary Gibbon, Sharon Hobbs, Victoria Jones, Patricia Kidd, Carol Lake, Rosamund Lane, Naheed Malik, Geoff Marlow, Graham Paterson, Kathy Paterson, Roy Pebody, David Pope, Bill Robertson, Tony Russell, David Thompson, James Turner, Murray Walker, Jackie Watts, Maurice West;
Gaeta (I) -
Giuseppe Porceddu (Co-Team Coach), Raffaele Porceddu (Co-Team Coach), Rita Alicandro, Pasqualino Aceto, Silvio Casaburi, Angelo Ciccione, Elvira Franzoni, Daniela Ottavini, Mauro Ottavini, Patrizia Panciera, Sebastiano Patti, Giuseppe Romano, Giovanni Tomai, Patrizia Traniello;

Anloo (NL) - Albert Copman, Pieter Oostinger, Pieter Scrombek, Cordena Zuiper.

Games: Attack of the Indians, The Twisting Duel, Lassoing the Cowgirls, The Corn Sack Swing, The Saloon Glasses, The Bucking Bronco, Recovering the Loot and The Cavalry to the Rescue;
Fil Rouge: Escaping from Jail;
Jokers: Joker Cards.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 1 2 --- 1 10 2 3 2 1

CH

8 1 4 --- 2 5 5 7 7

D

12 6 2 6 --- 3 4 6 5
F 2 6 6 6 3 --- 2 1 3

GB

5 4 4 3 1 12 --- 4 6
I --- 5 6 4 12 1 1 3 2
NL 3 --- 2 3 5 4 12 6 4
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 1 3 3 4 14 16 19 21 22

CH

8 9 13 13 15 20 25 32 39

D

12 18 20 26 26 29 33 39 44
F 2 8 14 20 23 23 35 26 29

GB

5 9 13 16 17 29 29 33 39
I 0 5 11 15 27 28 29 32 34
NL 3 3 5 8 13 17 29 35 39

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
2nd
2nd
5th
6th
7th

 D • Kempten im Allgäu l
 CH • Muotathal
l
 GB • Rugby
 NL • Anloo
 I • Gaeta
 F • Lunéville
 B • Angleur

44
39
39
39
34
29
22

The Venue

Northampton, Great Britain

This heat was held on the site of the former racecourse in Northampton. At just over 118 acres, it is one of the largest landmarks of the town. Horse races had been held on the site unofficially
since 1632, although the official course meetings were held out of town on Harlestone and Dallington Heath. However, due to the number of accidents at these races, they were stopped in 1861. Despite a nationwide waning of interest in the sport, Lord Spencer resumed race meetings on the Heath in 1727 and by 1937, he held the first official meeting on the new course. These races were very popular and were frequently visited by royalty, including the Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII.

With the development of the Racecourse, the surrounding area was transformed with large houses being built for the ardent race goers including a public house. To the far side of the park is The White Elephant public house, which started life as the Kingsley Park Hotel and was built to serve the racing fraternity when the Racecourse was used for horse racing. Following the death of spectators, the Jockey Club closed the course for race meetings in 1904 and the hotel was left out on a limb and became a "white elephant". Jokingly, this became its usual name among locals and the brewery bowed to popular demand and officially renamed it The White Elephant.

On a more chilling note, races were not the only spectator event held on the site. From 1715 until 1818, the site was used for public executions!

At the time of the programme, Northampton was a centre of the shoemaking and leather trade. During the presentation of the trophy to the winning West German team, Brian Cowgill handed the Kempten im Allgäu team captain a pair of leather cowboy boots and stated that they were a gift from the people of the town. Sadly, with the cheaper imported goods market, the industry in the town no longer survives and the old factories, still surrounded by terraced houses specifically built for the workers, have been converted into offices or luxury accommodation. Today the town’s industry still survives, but is now concentrated more on distribution and finance rather than manufacturing, and is home to some large companies such as Avon Products, Nationwide Building Society, Schweppes, Panasonic and Carlsberg. The headquarters of Barclaycard, the United Kingdom’s first credit card, has had its home in the town since its launch in 1966.

The Games in Detail

Game 4 - The Corn Sack Swing

Game 4 - ‘The Corn Sack Swing’ - was a variation of a game that had been used in many guises over the years and basically involved a blindfolded team member knocking down items whilst being instructed by a team-mate. When the Belgian competitor waited for the whistle, British referee Mike Swann turned him around three times (as had been done to the previous four participants) but Mike inadvertently faced him in the wrong direction to the game of play, and this resulted in the Belgian losing time whilst he got his bearings. Gennaro Olivieri blew the whistle and stopped the game and stated that he would give the Belgian another start as it had been unfair that he had started the game the wrong way round. At this point one of the horses in the arena whinnied loudly in agreement with Gennaro’s decision and this was met with a roar of laughter not only from the crowd, but also from presenters, commentators and Gennaro himself.


Game 5 - The Saloon Glasses

On Game 5 - ‘The Saloon Glasses’ - there was a clear judging error, but fortunately it did not affect the overall scoring on the game or the heat. The game involved three saloon waitresses descending a slide and they had to catch glasses which were slid along a bar by a team-mate. Each girl descended the slide four times and the maximum score if all the glasses were caught was twelve. The Italian team of Gaeta played their Joker on the game, but were clearly shown as missing at least two of the twelve glasses. However, when Gennaro announced the scores he stated that the Italians had scored twelve. If the correct score of ten had been announced it would still have given the win to them anyway, but this error could have resulted in wider implications with the scoring, as had been seen in the past.


Game 6 - The Bucking Bronco

Game 6 - ‘The Bucking Bronco’ - (far superior to the version played at the Dutch heat in 1973) involved a boy from each team having to sit on a ‘bucking bronco’ which was mounted on a multi-pivoted platform which could be rocked from side to side and up and down by opposing team members. The idea of the game was to simulate the ‘bucking’ action of a rodeo horse and the boy had to stay ‘in the saddle’ for as long as he could, up to a maximum of the 1 minute time limit. The team of Rugby, representing Great Britain, played their Joker on the game, and as none of the previous four competitors had stayed on for more than 23 seconds (including Britain’s strongest rivals in the heat - West German team Kempten im Allgäu), all the British competitor, George Bust, had to do was stay on for longer to secure a minimum of 10 pts. Gennaro Olivieri blew the whistle to start the game, but no matter how hard the opposing Belgian team members tried, they could not unseat him. As time passed, the noise of the cheers from the home crowd was so loud that it quite literally drowned out presenter Stuart Hall’s voice even with his microphone. For all his efforts, George stayed on for the full one minute and secured the maximum 12pts for the team. Swiss team member Peter Schelbert followed George onto the ‘bronco’ and despite being thrown from the top of the horse within seconds of the start, with some amazing contortions and strength in his legs he managed to hold on and dangled below for 55 seconds, before he submitted to his fate.


Game 8 - The Cavalry to the Rescue

Halfway through the final game, the wagon being used by the West German team lost a wheel and they were unable to continue. As this was a first-past-the-post game, it gave referee Gennaro Olivieri a problem whether to cancel the game and play the reserve game or give the team another go. He stated that this all depended on whether they could get some of the equipment used back into its original place for a restart to take place. As this programme was being broadcast live by many of the countries, the delay therefore could not be sustained for too long. At this point West German commentator Karl-Heinz Wocker stated that England had always been known for its fair play and was confident that a re-run would take place. Eventually the delay lasted for just over three minutes and before the whistle Gennaro stated that all the finishing times for the other six countries had been recorded by the touch-judges and so therefore they would be able to time the German team. Ironically, the fastest two teams on the game were Switzerland and Great Britain, and whilst the West German team finished in the third fastest time on the re-run, they achieved it by using the equipment which had been used by Switzerland and Great Britain in the earlier first run! Before he announced the results Gennaro said that, with the absence of Guido, he would like to thank all the judges for their help throughout the programme.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

Dressed as a cowboy, British presenter Stuart Hall opened the show by firing shots into the air from his pistol. However, he forgot to use his microphone and his voice was barely picked up by the on-site microphones. Within five seconds he had realised his mistake and proceeded to repeat everything he had already said! After introducing his co-presenter as Wild Bill Waring, Eddie stepped out of the stagecoach, but as he went to throw his Stetson off his head he had forgotten about the strap under his chin and almost choked himself!

Arthur Ellis stood in for Guido Pancaldi as co-referee with Gennaro Olivieri for this heat, as Guido Pancaldi had to return suddenly to Switzerland to deal with some family matters.

Made in Colour • This programme exists in the BBC Archives, and short excerpts from this edition also exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

D

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

Heat 7

Event Staged: Wednesday 4th September 1974
Venue: Luitpoldplatz, Bayreuth, West Germany

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)

NCRV (NL): Wednesday 4th September 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Thursday 5th September 1974
A2 (F):
Thursday 12th September 1974 (7th)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 13th September 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophy presented by: Marie-Louise Steinbauer

Theme: Wagner's Operas and Hans Sachs

Teams: Marchienne-au-Pont (B) v. Carouge (CH) v. Bayreuth (D) v.
Senlis (F) v. Ripon (GB) v. Marostica (I) v. Gendringen (NL)

Team Members included:
Bayreuth (D) -
Anton Engelbrecht, Karin Engelbrecht, Emgard Fücher, Karen Schrüdel and Peter Zeitler;
Ripon (GB) -
Mike Falkingham (Team Manager), Peter Squires (Team Coach), Mike Hart (Men’s Team Captain), Valerie Briscombe (Ladies’ Team Captain), Peter Appleton, Carol Bainbridge, Michael Barry, Helen Brocklebank, Judy Carling, Margaret Clough, David Colbert, David Day, Peter Ellis, John Falkingham, Mick Forsyth, Michael Gray, Arthur Gyte, Thelma Harrison, David Hirst, David Holmes, Susan Hurst, Andy Jackson, Sue Lever, Alan Marshall, Frank Marshall, Alistair McBain, John Newbould, Jean Ogden, Rod Pickles, Des Quinn, Lana Simpson, Eric Southern, Penny Stanhope, Margaret Storey, Jill Thornton, Caroline Varley, John Williamson, Roland Wood;
Marostica (I) -
Lucia Valente (Team Captain), Micaela Basso, Marilisa Basso, Antonio Ceron, Lucia Comis, Giorgio dal Molin, Wilma Fontana, Gianni Gasparini, Mauro Liberalon, Luciano Mattesco, Claudio Mattesco, Maria Mazzariol, Stefano Miazzon, Manrico Parolin, Mariano Roman, Walter Rubin, Ruggero Stragliotto, Luciano Viero;
Gendringen (NL) - Hen Hendrik.

Games: Repairing the Shoes, The Dragon Slayers, The Swans, The Meistersingers, Brünnhilde the Valkyrie, The Nibelung Dwarf, The Revolving Horses and The Girls of the Rhine;
Fil Rouge: The Flying Dutchman;
Jokers:
Meistersingers.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 3 1 6 1 --- 4 5 5 3

CH

5 5 4 6 1 --- 1 1 7

D

4 6 2 6 5 4 --- 6 5
F --- 4 3 5 4 1 4 2 3

GB

1 --- 1 4 12 3 4 4 4
I 6 2 --- 1 4 6 12 7 6
NL 1 6 5 --- 3 10 2 4 1
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 3 4 10 11 11 15 20 25 28

CH

5 10 14 20 21 21 22 23 30

D

4 10 12 18 23 27 27 33 38
F 0 4 7 12 16 17 21 23 26

GB

1 1 2 6 18 21 25 29 33
I 6 8 8 9 13 19 31 38 44
NL 1 7 12 12 15 25 27 31 32

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th

 I • Marostica l l
 D • Bayreuth
 GB • Ripon
 NL • Gendringen
 CH • Carouge
 B • Marchienne-au-Pont
 F • Senlis

44
38
33
32
30
28
26

The Venue

Bayreuth, West Germany

This heat was held on the street at Luitpoldplatz, in the north of Bayreuth. The street had been blocked off and closed to all traffic and one of the longest spectator stands ever seen in the programme’s history was erected along the western side of the road in front of the restaurants, shops and one of the town’s Commerzbank buildings.

The Games in Detail

Game 5 - The Saloon Glasses

British team Ripon played their Joker on Game 5 - ‘Brünnhilde the Valkyrie’ - and were only one of two teams to win their Jokers on the night. The game was played in six heats and the British team went first. After the team had played the game, West German presenter Erhard Keller introduced British competitor Thelma Harrison to the home crowd. He then continued to speak fluently German to Thelma, who surprisingly understood and then responded in German. Erhard explained that she spoke very good German because she had spent a lot of her youth in Germany. Questioning her on the British performance, she stated that she thought the team had done enough to win!

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

At the beginning of the programme, presenters Erhard Keller and Marie-Louise Steinbauer entered the arena on a large motorised swan. Before handing over to her, Erhard stated that Marie-Louise was the first female presenter of Spiel Ohne Grenzen (the German name for Jeux Sans Frontières), which was met with a resounding cheer and a round of applause. However, this was an error on his and the production team’s part, as female presenter Lilo Katzke had presented Spiel Ohne Grenzen for West Germany during the 1965 series and Renata Calani during the 1972 and 1973 series!

Returning Teams and Competitors

Four members of Italian team Marostica - Lucia Comis, Wilma Fontana, Maria Mazzariol and Walter Rubin - had all previously participated in Jeux Sans Frontières. All four had been members of the Bassano del Grappa team in 1970 and Wilma Fontana and Maria Mazzariol had also participated as members of the Jésolo team in 1971 (including the festive It’s A Christmas Knockout contest). Maria Mazzariol had also been a member of the Adria team in 1969, and returned again as a member of the Treviso team in 1990.

Additional Information

With two exceptions, all the games in this heat were based on Richard Wagner’s operas. The other two (*) were based on Hans Sachs, a 16th century poet, shoemaker and master singer from Nürnberg.

Game 1
Game 2
Game 3
Game 4
Game 5
Game 6
Game 7
Game 8
Fil Rouge

Hans Sachs die Schumacher (*)
Siegfreid
Lohengrin
Die Meistersinger (*)
Die Walküre
Siegfried
Parsifal
Das Rheingold
Der Fliegende Holländer

 

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

Teams Qualifying for International Final

Country

 Team Qualifying Heat Position Points
B  Vilvoorde 4 CH =3 34

CH

 Muotathal

6 GB =2 39

D

 Rosenheim

1 B 1 47
F  Nancy 3 I 1 44

GB

 Farnham

4 CH =1 40
I  Marostica 7 D 1 44
NL  Zandvoort 2 NL 1 40
 

NL

Jeux Sans Frontières 1974

International Final

Event Staged: Wednesday 18th September 1974
Venue: Parking van Stedelijk Molenmuseum de Valk (De Valk Windmill Museum Car Park),
Lammermarkt, Leiden, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
BRT (B):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RTB (B): Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SSR (CH-French):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
SRG (CH-German):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
TSI (CH-Italian):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.20pm (Live)
ARD-WDR (D):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.30pm (Live)
NCRV (NL): Wednesday 18th September 1974, 9.05-10.25pm (Live)
RAI Due (I):
Wednesday 18th September 1974, 10.05-11.30pm (Live - DST)
A2 (F):
Thursday 19th September 1974 (8th)
BBC1 (GB):
Friday 20th September 1974, 7.45-9.00pm

Winners' Trophies presented by: Mayor of Leiden

Theme: Spanish War of Liberation, 1574

Teams: Vilvoorde (B) v. Muotathal (CH) v. Rosenheim (D) v. Nancy (F) v.
Farnham (GB) v. Marostica (I) v. Zandvoort (NL)

Team Members included:
Muotathal (CH) -
Peter Schelbert;
Rosenheim (D) - Richard Horner (Team Trainer), Hans Wagner (Team Captain), Reinhard Gellart, Kristof Kopf, Resi Mayr, Fritz Ohlwärter, Peter Rochof, Ingrid Schöner, Peter Wiesner;
Nancy (F) -
André Laurain (Team Captain), Geneviève Serreau (Ladies' Captain), Joëlle Carpentier, Thierry Dabrowski, Marcel Desbuis, Philippe Genin, Dominique Herbinet, Marie-Lyse Jacquiert, Noëlle Jarry, François Lombard, Josette Lombard, Maurice Reswerski, Christian Ries and Catherine Spettel;
Farnham (GB) -
James Wilson (Team Manager), Robert Bradley (Team Coach), William Allen, Yvonne Andrews, Gareth Angel, Christopher Bonner, Judy Comber, Ian Carter, Andrew Christmas, Geoffrey Clark, David ‘Scotty’ Colston, Helen Cooper, Valerie Cooper, Richard Curtis, Barrie Dinsdale, John Dinsdale, Janice Farry, Nicholas De Meric, Barbara Freeman, Pamela Gale, Jefferson Green, Peter Grenham, Lynne Hammett, Sara Hatcher, Felicity Hayes, Ian Hiscock, Glynis Hughes, Jean McLeod, Andrew McSherry, Keith Maisey, Keith Morris, Keith Mortimer, Hugh Osborne, Robert Osbourne, Gillian Parry, Sandra Parsons, Ian Powell, Jeanette Quay, Brian Roberts, Jill Simpson, Kenneth Smith, Margaret Smith, Dino Timms, Susan Tunnicliffe, Andrew Tutt, Michael Vernon, Ronald Wallis, Barry Welch, Susan Wheeler, Sarah Wickins, Martin Wilkes, Ray Woodstock and Robert Young;
Marostica (I) - Lucia Valente (Team Captain), Micaela Basso, Marilisa Basso, Antonio Ceron, Lucia Comis, Giorgio dal Molin, Wilma Fontana, Gianni Gasparini, Mauro Liberalon, Luciano Mattesco, Claudio Mattesco, Maria Mazzariol, Stefano Miazzon, Manrico Parolin, Mariano Roman, Walter Rubin, Ruggero Stragliotto, Luciano Viero.

Games: Casserole Ingredients, The Angry Citizens, Pulling the Cannon, The Barrel Race, Food for the Prisoners, The Castle Siege, Setting Sail and Liberation of the City;
Fil Rouge: Bread for the Citizens;
Jokers:
Leiden Coat of Arms.

Game Results and Standings

Games

Team / Colour

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 FR 8
Points Scored
(Joker games shown in red)
B 5 2 --- 4 5 8 1 2 3

CH

2 5 8 1 6 6 --- 7 5

D

--- 6 6 2 6 2 4 3 7
F 4 4 1 5 2 --- 10 6 6

GB

12 1 5 3 --- 1 2 4 2
I 3 3 2 --- 4 6 12 5 4
NL 1 --- 3 12 1 3 3 1 1
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
B 5 7 7 11 16 24 25 27 30

CH

2 7 15 16 22 28 28 35 40

D

0 6 12 14 20 22 26 29 36
F 4 8 9 14 16 16 26 32 38

GB

12 13 18 21 21 22 24 28 30
I 3 6 8 8 12 18 30 35 39
NL 1 1 4 16 17 20 23 24 25

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
5th
7th

 CH • Muotathal l
 I • Marostica
l
 F • Nancy
l
 D • Rosenheim
 GB • Farnham
 B • Vilvoorde
 NL • Zandvoort

40
39
38
36
30
30
25

The Host Town

Leiden, Netherlands

Leiden is a city which lies at sea level elevation with a population of around 120,000 inhabitants in the province of South Holland. It is situated on the Oude Rijn (Old Rhine) river, a 52km (32¼ miles) branch of the Rhine, and is located 16km (10 miles) north-east of Den Haag and 36km (22¼ miles) south-west of Amsterdam. The city lies at what has traditionally been an important junction where waterways and roads cross and will enchant all who visit. The city is famous for its almshouses, university, museums and glorious history. The spirit of the Golden Age lives on here, a place where artist Rembrandt (1606-1669) was born and inspired so many other influential painters. But even after this era, Leiden continued to attract scientists, artists and industry. The canals, the historical buildings, the alleyways, the treasuries of knowledge, culture and science in Leiden are definitely worth a visit.

By the end of the 15th century, Leiden was the largest city in the county of Holland. This was largely due to the international cloth-making industry. However, the economic tide began to turn with the advent of the 16th century. The reformation led to mass prosecution of Protestants and in 1572, Leiden joined the Dutch resistance against Spain's oppression. The people of Leiden succumbed to disease and starvation and the Spanish nearly conquered the city. However, they successfully drove the troops out on 3rd October 1574. The great liberation, known as Leidens Ontzet (Relief of Leiden), is still lavishly celebrated today. This huge party is not the only result of the Spanish occupation but also that the city was allegedly given the university as a reward for its heroic resistance.

 

Morspoort, Leiden's west gate, was constructed in 1669
and was originally used as a prison

 

The Relief marked the beginning of a new Golden Age. In 1577, tens of thousands of Dutch people from the south flocked to Leiden on account of their Calvinist faith. These were experienced textile workers and business people who helped revive the failing wool industry in Leiden with new products, techniques, capital and labour and Leiden became the second largest city after Amsterdam. Despite major plague epidemics, the population quadrupled resulting in the city being expanded in 1611, 1644 and again in 1659, when the network of canals was laid out in its current incarnation. At the height of the boom around 1670, the city was densely populated by some 60,000 people. After Amsterdam, Leiden is the city with the most canals with the city’s historic centre having more than 28km (17¼ miles) of canals and waterways. To cross all these waterways, you obviously need bridges, and Leiden has no less than 88!

The city’s wool industry was steadily declining in the 18th century with work drying up and people moving elsewhere. This downturn caused by the failing wool industry led to unrest and the ongoing war waged by Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) only aggravated the situation. The final straw came when Leiden was struck by catastrophic disaster. On 12th January 1807, a ship loaded with 17,400kg (38,360lb) of gunpowder exploded in the middle of Leiden, killing 151 persons. Over 2000 others were injured and some 220 homes were destroyed. King Louis Bonaparte (1778-1846) personally visited the city to provide assistance to the victims. Although located in the centre of the city, the area destroyed remained empty for many years, with the space eventually turned into a public park in 1886.

After 1815, the city began to show signs of recovery once more when Leiden's industry began to diversify during the second half of the century with emerging new sectors such as metal, printing and canning. Leiden underwent a dramatic transformation during the last 30 years of the 20th century. In the 1960s, it was a rundown industrial city with the university as its main claim to fame. By the early 1980s, the industries had disappeared, and unemployment was rampant. However, the city managed to again bounce back by tapping into new sectors.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

As had been the case at the International Final in 1973, the Fil Rouge was presented separately by the commentators from each country on-site, instead of their usual voice-over from the commentary boxes.

Additional Information

This International Final failed to live up to its counterparts in the previous two years, and disappointingly had none of the flair or costumes associated with a Jeux Sans Frontières Final. However, for the British it looked liked it could have been a double celebration after last year’s victory, when the team of Farnham played and won their Joker on the first game. This possibility was very short-lived, when the team finished in the bottom place on the second game and from then on it was not to be their night.

The three top teams in this International Final really left it to the end to take control, by picking up the majority of their points on the last four games they played (which included the Fil Rouge). The French team of Nancy picked up 24 of their 38pts, the Italians of Marostica picked up 27 of their 39pts and the Swiss of Muotathal picked up 24 of their 40pts. The other four teams combined could only pick up a total of 47pts between them over the same period, an average of just 2.93pts a game!

The Jokers presented to the referees represented the coat of arms of Leiden - a red lion rampart supporting a white shield displaying two red keys in an X-shape - with the Latin phrase Haec Libertatis Ergo translated as Therefore These Things of Freedom. The two keys are said to be those to the gates of heaven held by St. Peter, for whom a large church in the city centre is named. By this coat of arms, Leiden is sometimes referred to as the Sleutelstad or The Key City.

This International Final almost never took place on the scheduled date of September 18th 1974. Just five days before the recording of this heat, four members of the Japanese United Red Army seized eleven hostages from the French Embassy in Den Haag / The Hague, including the French Ambassador to the Netherlands, Jacques Senard. The kidnappers demanded a ransom of $1,000,000 and the release of Yutaka Furuya, a Red Army member who had been arrested on July 21st at Paris’ Orly Airport. The French team refused to participate whilst one of its internal dignitaries was being held in this manner. Dutch TV officials had decided that it would be inappropriate to continue their plans to record on the scheduled evening with the on-going situation. This would have caused much trouble with other broadcasters as the Belgian, Swiss, West German, Italian and Dutch television broadcasters had all scheduled a ‘live’ broadcast of the Final on the 18th, whilst the A2 and BBC transmissions were scheduled for Thursday 19th and Friday 20th September respectively. However, on the morning of Tuesday 17th September the demands of the terrorists were met and all hostages were freed. Rehearsals for the event were quickly rearranged, and instead of the normal two rehearsals on the preceding two days, the first rehearsal was staged later that afternoon (with very few spectators), whilst the dress rehearsal was staged that evening (in front of a larger crowd), but finishing well into the night. This near-cancellation had a significant effect on the BBC’s subsequent scheduling. From 1975, the BBC scheduled the International series transmissions to take place much later into the autumn to avoid such a complication reoccurring.

After winning their International Heat back in May and qualifying for the International Final, the Rosenheim team from West Germany were so determined to win that they drafted in a number of local sports professionals including skier Resi Mayr, trampolinist Ingrid Schöner and bobsledders Fritz Ohlwärter and Hans Wagner. However, this was to no avail as the team misjudged playing their Joker and could only win three games on the night, as opposed to the five they had won in the first heat in Bouillon, Belgium.

The Nancy team dedicated their endeavours in the International Final to the memory of their team member, André Rotta, who had tragically died between the Barga International Heat and this International Final.

The Dutch team of Zandvoort set an infamous record in this programme as the first of only two home teams ever to finish in the bottom spot in an International Final! This unwanted record was equalled fourteen years later by the Italian team of Aosta-Pila in the 1988 International Final.

This edition celebrated the close of the 10th series of Jeux Sans Frontières.

Made in Colour • This programme does not exist in the BBC Archives, but short excerpts from this edition exist in the BBC compilation, Best of Knockout 1974. Details in Knockout TV.
Exists in European archives

 

JSFnetGB Series Guide pages researched by
Alan Hayes, David Hamilton, Neil Storer, Christos Moustakas, Philippe Minet,
Sébastien Dias, Ischa Bijl, Paul Leaver and JSFnet Websites