Zeskamp 1971-1972
Dutch Domestic Series

Presenters:
Dick Passchier
Barend Barendse

Referees:
Unknown

Games Designer:
Dick Van't Sant

An NCRV Production
 

Key:
Domestic Heats
= Qualified for next stage / = Heat Winner
= Qualified for International Series
Super Final
= Gold Trophy / = Silver Trophy
 

 ▲ = Promoted to Position / ▼ = Demoted to Position

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 1, Heat 1

Event Staged: Saturday 9th October 1971
Venue: Sportspaleis 'Ahoy' (Ahoy Sports Palace), Zuidwijk,
Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 9th October 1971 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Bladel v. Emmeloord v. Franeker v. IJsselstein v.
Lisse v. Ridderkerk v. Veendam v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League

Aggregate

1st
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

 VY • Venray
 B • Bladel
 EEmmeloord
 F Franeker
 I IJsselstein
 L Lisse
 R • Ridderkerk
 VM Veendam
 Z • Zelhem

37 (9)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

9
-
-
-
-

-
-
-
-

The Host Town

Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland

Rotterdam is the second largest city in Netherlands with a population of around 630,000 inhabitants. It is located in the Zuid Holland province on the Nieuwe Maas river, 21km (13 miles) south-east of Den Haag, 57km (35½ miles) south-west of Amsterdam and 98km (61 miles) west of Arnhem.

The port is the largest cargo port in Europe and the 10th largest in the world. Its logistic success is based on its strategic location on the North Sea, directly at the mouth of the Nieuwe Maas permitting waterway access into the heart of Western Europe, including the highly industrialised Ruhr region.

The city dates from at least AD 900 with a settlement at the lower end of the fen stream Rotte (or Rotta, as it was then known, from ‘rot’ (muddy) and ‘a’ (water), thus 'muddy water'). Around 1150, large floods in the area ended development, leading to the construction of protective dikes and dams along the northern banks of the present-day Nieuwe Maas. A dam on the Rotte or 'Rotterdam' was built in the 1260s and was located at the present-day Hoogstraat (High Street). On 7th July 1340, Count Willem IV of Holland (1307-1345) granted city rights to Rotterdam, which then had approximately 2,000 inhabitants.

 

An aerial view of the bustling shipping port of Rotterdam

 

The port of Rotterdam grew slowly but steadily into a port of importance, becoming the seat of one of the six 'chambers' of the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC), the Dutch East India Company. The greatest spurt of growth, both in port activity and population, followed the completion of the Nieuwe Waterweg in 1872. The city and harbour started to expand on the south bank of the river.

During World War I (1914-1918), the city was the world's largest spy centre because of Dutch neutrality and its location in between England, Germany and occupied Belgium. During World War II (1939-1945), the German army invaded the Netherlands on 10th May 1940. Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) had hoped to conquer the country in just one day, but his forces met unexpectedly fierce resistance. On 15th May 1940, the Dutch army was finally forced to capitulate, following Hitler's bombing of Rotterdam the previous day and his threats to bomb other Dutch cities. The heart of Rotterdam was almost completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe. Some 80,000 civilians were made homeless and 900 were killed.

Rotterdam was gradually rebuilt from the 1950s through to the 1970s. It remained quite windy and open until the city councils from the 1980s on began developing an active architectural policy. Daring and new styles of apartments, office buildings and recreation facilities resulted in a more 'liveable' city centre with a new skyline.

One of the two most popular tourist attractions of the city is the Zomercarnaval (Summer Carnival) which takes place annually in late July or early August. The first carnival was staged on 4th August 1984 and it offers residents and tourists, the opportunity to experience a taste of those celebrated in Latin America and the Cape Verde Islands albeit some what dampened down by the cooler north European climate. Although the street parade attracts the most visitors, the carnival is a multi-day event and attracts almost one million people a year to the city. On Saturday, a week prior to the parade, a new Carnival Queen is elected at the Cruise Terminal Building on the Wilhelmina Pier. The following Thursday, a Beach Party is held at the Strand aan de Maas, an large open area on the opposite side of the Nieuwe Maas river to the Cruise Terminal Building, at which several brass bands, DJ's and the newly chosen Queen attend. On Friday evening, the Battle of Drums is staged, an event in which several brass bands compete to be named the official Zomercarnaval brass band and earn a spot in the street parade, as well as being invited to take part in the famous Notting Hill Carnival in London during the August Bank Holiday weekend. The parade, which is held on the Saturday and is the culmination of the week-long celebrations, includes brass bands and thousands of dancers and two ‘live on stage’ concerts at the Coolsingel and the Churchillplein until late in the evening.

The second of the top attractions is the Diergaarde Blijdorp (Blijdorp Zoo) which was designed by architect Sybold van Revesteyn (1889-1983) following damage sustained to the old zoo building during bombing raids on 10th May 1940. Constructed slightly north of its original location, street names such as Diergaardesingel (Zoo Lane) still recall the old zoo. Despite current trends for animal rights, the zoo houses a vast variety of animals and birds from all over the globe. However, with funding from the city being reduced annually, its survival is in jeopardy.

The Venue

Sportspaleis 'Ahoy'

This heat was staged at the Sportspaleis ‘Ahoy’ (part of the Ahoy Rotterdam complex), an indoor sporting arena standing in the Dijkzigtterrein, part of the reconstructed Rotterdam port area which had been severely damaged by bombing in the Second World War (1939-1945). The site had been home to an exhibition hall which had been built to celebrate the reconstruction work with a special 'Rotterdam Ahoy!' exhibition. Amusingly, for some years after, when the dot of the exclamation mark had dropped off the sign, the exhibition hall became known as the Ahoy-Hal and no one seemed to mind. The hall staged many national and international events, including a notable exhibition of the work of celebrated American architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959). It also proved its worth as a reception centre for the victims of the North Sea flood, a major natural disaster on the night of Saturday 31st January 1953 that affected the coastlines of the Netherlands, Belgium and England, claiming over two thousand lives and displaced thousands more.
 

The main entrance to the Ahoy Rotterdam
with its iconic red main entrance logo

 

Building work on the Ahoy Rotterdam commenced in 1968 and by 1970, three exhibition halls and the Sports Palace were completed. The first event to be staged at the new facilities was the Femina family fair, held in September 1970. Three months later, on Thursday 15th January 1971, the Ahoy was officially opened by HRH Prince Claus (1926-2002). Audience capacity of the arena was set at 10,000 spectators and the complex's impressive design by architects Van der Stoep and Groosman garnered a number of international awards for the special steel structures used in the arena's construction.

Since the Ahoy's auspicious opening, it has been the venue for the 1975 European Final of the BBC / Transworld Sport programme Superstars (hosted by British Jeux Sans Frontières presenter, David Vine (1935-2009)), the 2007 Junior Eurovision Song Contest and has played host to ATP World Tennis Tour and International Dog Show events for many years. It is also popular as a concert venue and has seen the likes of Elton John, Iron Maiden, Deep Purple, Alanis Morissette, Rush, Shakira and the popular Dutch singer Lee Towers play and make live concert video programmes there. The Ahoy has been expanded on a number of occasions, including major renovation in 1998 to create today's multifunctional venue. It was renamed Ahoy Rotterdam at around this time and celebrated its 40th Anniversary in January 2011.

Additional Information

The format of Zeskamp for 1971-1972 was similar to that of the previous series with nine teams competing and qualification for each phase was based upon league tables, with heat winners awarded 9 league points down to 9th placed teams receiving 1pt. The series opened up with three preliminary heats after which three teams were eliminated. The six teams that were involved after this first stage all qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières and continued to battle it out in Zeskamp. However, in addition to these, the highest-scoring of those eliminated would also qualify to represent Netherlands at the Dutch International heat.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 1, Heat 2

Event Staged: Saturday 6th November 1971
Venue: Martinihal, Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 6th November 1971 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Bladel v. Emmeloord v. Franeker v. IJsselstein v.
Lisse v. Ridderkerk v. Veendam v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League

Aggregate

2nd
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

 VY • Venray
 B • Bladel
 EEmmeloord
 F Franeker
 I IJsselstein
 L Lisse
 R • Ridderkerk
 VM Veendam
 Z • Zelhem

- (8)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

17
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

The Host Town

Groningen, Groningen

Groningen is the capital and largest city of its eponymous province in the north-east of the Netherlands. It has a population of just under 200,000 inhabitants and is located 51km (31½ miles) east of Leeuwarden, 85km (52¾ miles) north of Zwolle, 147km (91¼ miles) north-east of Amsterdam and 35km (21¾ miles) west of the German border.

 

The Festung Boutange is an abandoned fortress
built during the Eighty Years' War

 

The city was founded on the northernmost point of the Hondsrug area (a large ridge of sand on which much of the province and neighbouring Drenthe is built). Groningen was founded around AD 950 at the site of a Roman camp and has a rich history, which can clearly be seen from the old medieval buildings in the downtown area. However, the oldest document referring to Groningen's existence only dates from 1040. In the 13th century, when the city was an important trade centre, its inhabitants built a city wall to underline its authority. The city had a strong influence on the surrounding lands and made its dialect a common tongue. The most influential period of the city was the end of the 15th century, when the nearby province of Friesland was administered from Groningen. During this period (1492), the Martinitoren (Martini Tower) in the market square was built, which loomed over the city at a height of 97m (318ft 3in), making it the highest building in Europe at the time. The city's independence came to an end when it chose to join forces with the Spanish during the Eighty Years' War (1568-1648) in 1594. It later switched sides, joining the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands.

In 1614, the University of Groningen was founded, initially only for religious education and in the same period, the city expanded rapidly and a new city wall was built. That same wall was tested during the Third Anglo-Dutch War (1672-1674), when the city was attacked fiercely by the bishop of Münster, Christoph Bernhard von Galen (1606-1678). Fortunately, the city’s wall resisted and this event, known as Gronings Ontzet (Siege of Groningen), is celebrated with music and fireworks on 28th August each year.

Groningen has been called the ‘World Cycling City’ because 57% of all journeys made within the city are by bicycle and, as is the case with most Dutch cities, it is well adapted to the high number of cyclists. A large network of bike paths make it convenient to cycle to various destinations and, within the city, the bicycle is the most popular means of transportation. Groningen's nightlife depends largely on the population of students studying at Groningen University (28,000) and the Hanze University of Applied Sciences (25,000). Its cultural scene is vibrant and remarkable for a city of its size with the Grote Markt, the Vismarkt, the Poelestraat and Peperstraat (the surrounding streets) crowded every night of the week, with most bars not closing until 5.00am!

An absolute must for any visitor to the region is an excursion to the village of Bourtange. Located in the province of Groningen, it is actually 48km (30 miles) south-east of the city centre near the German border. Although it only has a population of 430 inhabitants, thousand of tourists flock to the village each year to see the star-shaped Festung (Fort) Bourtange. It was built in 1593 during the Eighty Years' War (1568-1648) when William I of Orange (1533-1584) wanted to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen which at the time was controlled by the Spanish. The fort was used until 1851, after which it was given up and it became a normal village. However, around 1960, living conditions in the village deteriorated to such a state that it was decided that Bourtange would be rebuilt to its former glory and today it is used as an open-air museum.

The Venue

Martinihal

The venue for this heat was a large events hall known as Martinihal, located adjacent to playing fields which were part of the Stadspark sports facility.

In the late 1960s, the municipality of Groningen revealed that an exhibition complex was to be built on the edge of the Groningen City Park. The Martinihal would consist of exhibition space, meeting rooms and a restaurant. The official opening took place in 1969 and hall had a ceiling height of 30m (8ft 5¼in) in order for it to cater for exhibitions such as boat shows offering sailboats with large standing masts.
 

The original Martinihal, built in 1969,
was renovated beyond recognition in the late 1990s

 

In the early 1970s, the building was extended with a multi-function hall for organizing (pop) concerts and sports competitions. The room was separated by a large open square area which could be used for car parking. The Event Hall had a capacity of about 2,500 visitors (concert) or 3,000 visitors (sports). Before the construction of the television studios in Aalsmeer, popular TV shows were frequently filmed here.

In 1978, the Martinihal Centre became a leading location in terms of conferences, meetings and exhibitions and in the early 1980s several extra rooms were built. In 1988, the name of the complex was change to Martinihal Groningen. The following year, the Martinihal was in need of renovation but this could not be financed by the Municipality of Groningen, so the Martinihal needed to find sponsors. However, there were no suitable candidates. The Martinihal was then transferred to the independent Art and Culture Department of the municipality and a new management team was appointed.

Another major renovation of the complex took place in 2000 with the former centre square being replaced by a new event and sports hall, which meets all international standards for sport. The former Event Hall was converted into the Martini Plaza Theatre and, with a capacity of 1600 seats, made it one of the five largest theatres in the Netherlands. In March 2002, the complex was officially reopened under the name Martini Plaza and later that year the complex was taken over by the Onderwijs Cultuur Sport Welzijn (OCSW) (Department of Education, Culture, Sports and Wellness).
 

The ‘new’ Martinihal, completed in 2002,
offers not only a sports hall but also a shopping plaza

 

The Martinihal became home to professional Dutch basketball club Nationale-Nederlande Donar in 1973, when Dutch company Nationale-Nederlande became the club’s first sponsor. This was to last for nine years after which the company stopped its sponsorship in 1982. Following this, the club reverted back to its original 1881 name of GBV Donar (Groninger Basketbalvereniging), and following several sponsorships between 1986 and 2009, its current name is the GasTerra Flames Groningen, following sponsorship by natural gas supply company GasTerra.

Interestingly some of the area now occupied by the Martiniplaza was host to the Dutch International in 1976.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 1, Heat 3

Event Staged: Saturday 4th December 1971
Venue: Groenoordhallen (North Lobby Hall), Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 4th December 1971 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Bladel v. Emmeloord v. Franeker v. IJsselstein v.
Lisse v. Ridderkerk v. Veendam v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League

Aggregate

3rd
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

 VY • Venray
 B • Bladel

 EEmmeloord
 F Franeker

 I IJsselstein

 L Lisse

 R • Ridderkerk

 VM Veendam
 Z • Zelhem

- (7)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

24
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

As the highest-scoring eliminated team, Bladel qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Delft, Netherlands: staged on Wednesday 16th August 1972

The Host Town

Leiden, Zuid-Holland

Leiden is a city which lies at sea level elevation with a population of around 120,000 inhabitants in the province of South Holland. It is situated on the Oude Rijn (Old Rhine) river, a 52km (32¼ miles) branch of the Rhine, and is located 16km (10 miles) north-east of Den Haag and 36km (22¼ miles) south-west of Amsterdam. The city lies at what has traditionally been an important junction where waterways and roads cross and will enchant all who visit. The city is famous for its almshouses, university, museums and glorious history. The spirit of the Golden Age lives on here, a place where artist Rembrandt (1606-1669) was born and inspired so many other influential painters. But even after this era, Leiden continued to attract scientists, artists and industry. The canals, the historical buildings, the alleyways, the treasuries of knowledge, culture and science in Leiden are definitely worth a visit.

By the end of the 15th century, Leiden was the largest city in the county of Holland. This was largely due to the international cloth-making industry. However, the economic tide began to turn with the advent of the 16th century. The reformation led to mass prosecution of Protestants and in 1572, Leiden joined the Dutch resistance against Spain's oppression. The people of Leiden succumbed to disease and starvation and the Spanish nearly conquered the city. However, they successfully drove the troops out on 3rd October 1574. The great liberation, known as Leidens Ontzet (Relief of Leiden), is still lavishly celebrated today. This huge party is not the only result of the Spanish occupation but also that the city was allegedly given the university as a reward for its heroic resistance.

 

Morspoort, Leiden's west gate, was constructed in 1669
and was originally used as a prison

 

The Relief marked the beginning of a new Golden Age. In 1577, tens of thousands of Dutch people from the south flocked to Leiden on account of their Calvinist faith. These were experienced textile workers and business people who helped revive the failing wool industry in Leiden with new products, techniques, capital and labour and Leiden became the second largest city after Amsterdam. Despite major plague epidemics, the population quadrupled resulting in the city being expanded in 1611, 1644 and again in 1659, when the network of canals was laid out in its current incarnation. At the height of the boom around 1670, the city was densely populated by some 60,000 people. After Amsterdam, Leiden is the city with the most canals with the city’s historic centre having more than 28km (17¼ miles) of canals and waterways. To cross all these waterways, you obviously need bridges, and Leiden has no less than 88!

The city’s wool industry was steadily declining in the 18th century with work drying up and people moving elsewhere. This downturn caused by the failing wool industry led to unrest and the ongoing war waged by Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) only aggravated the situation. The final straw came when Leiden was struck by catastrophic disaster. On 12th January 1807, a ship loaded with 17,400kg (38,360lb) of gunpowder exploded in the middle of Leiden, killing 151 persons. Over 2000 others were injured and some 220 homes were destroyed. King Louis Bonaparte (1778-1846) personally visited the city to provide assistance to the victims. Although located in the centre of the city, the area destroyed remained empty for many years, with the space eventually turned into a public park in 1886.

After 1815, the city began to show signs of recovery once more when Leiden's industry began to diversify during the second half of the century with emerging new sectors such as metal, printing and canning. Leiden underwent a dramatic transformation during the last 30 years of the 20th century. In the 1960s, it was a rundown industrial city with the university as its main claim to fame. By the early 1980s, the industries had disappeared, and unemployment was rampant. However, the city managed to again bounce back by tapping into new sectors.

The Venue

Groenoordhallen

The games were played in the Groenoordhallen which was built in 1969 and was a complex of halls originally used to host the large regional cattle market in the city. For this reason it was located virtually in the centre of the city. However, following the FMD (Foot and Mouth Disease) crisis of 2001, the cattle market was no longer viable and finally closed its doors in 2005. Following some renovation work, the hall was reopened and hosted many national and international trade fairs, events, exams, product presentations, conferences, concerts and parties. Examples include Disney on Ice, paranormal shows and concerts by Genesis, U2, The Police, Dire Straits, Iron Maiden, Fleetwood Mac, Queen, Metallica, Santana, Kiss, The Osmonds and the Backstreet Boys.
 

The former Groenoordhallen which was demolished in 2010

 

In 2006, the Groenoordhallen played host to tennis. A Davis Cup promotion / relegation match between the Netherlands and the Czech Republic was held there, with the Netherlands losing 1-4 and being relegated. However despite all its uses, it was decided that the hall had ran its life by the middle of 2009, and in order to make way for homes and business premises, the Groenoordhallen would have to be demolished. The demolition was postponed until mid-2010 and when the work finally started, only the tower and part of Escher Groenoord Plaza remained.

Additional Information

The league tables continue to include the Round 1 scores into Round 2 and the points awarded run from 6pts for 1st place to 1pt for 6th place.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 2, Heat 1

Event Staged: Saturday 29th January 1972
Venue: Unknown, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 29th January 1972 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Franeker v. IJsselstein v. Lisse v.
Ridderkerk v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League

Aggregate

1st
-
-
-
-
-

 V • Venray
 F • Franeker
 I IJsselstein
 L Lisse
 R Ridderkerk
 Z • Zelhem

- (6)

-
-
-
-
-

30
-
-
-
-
-

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 2, Heat 2

Event Staged: Saturday 26th February 1972
Venue: Rijnhal (Rhine Hall), Elden, Arnhem, Gelderland, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 26th February 1972 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Franeker v. IJsselstein v. Lisse v.
Ridderkerk v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League

Aggregate

1st
-
-
-
-
-

 V • Venray
 F • Franeker
 I IJsselstein
 L Lisse
 R Ridderkerk
 Z • Zelhem

- (6)

-
-
-
-
-

36
-
-
-
-
-

The Venue

Rijnhal, Arnhem

This heat was held in Arnhem’s Rijnhal. The hall is a large multi-purpose arena which has witnessed many major rock concerts, sporting events and themed markets. The arena floor can also be used as an ice-skating rink during the winter months.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Round 2, Heat 3

Event Staged: Saturday 25th February 1972
Venue: Groenoordhallen (North Lobby Hall), Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 25th February 1972 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams: Franeker v. IJsselstein v. Lisse v.
Ridderkerk v. Venray v. Zelhem

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points +
(League Points)

League Aggregate

1st
-
-
-
-
-

 V • Venray
 F • Franeker

 I IJsselstein

 L Lisse

 R Ridderkerk

 Z • Zelhem

- (6)

-
-
-
-
-

42

-
-
-
-
-

Franeker qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Spa, Belgium:
staged on Tuesday 23rd May 1972

IJsselstein qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Bern, Switzerland:
staged on Wednesday 7th June 1972

Lisse qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Sheffield, Great Britain:
staged on Wednesday 2nd August 1972

Ridderkerk qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Westerland (Sylt), West Germany:
staged on Tuesday 20th June 1972

Venray qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Codroipo, Italy:
staged on Wednesday 5th July 1972

Zelhem qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Nice, France:
staged on Wednsday 19th July 1972

The Host Town and Venue

Leiden, Zuid-Holland

Groenoordhallen

Previously visited in Round 1, Heat 3.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

NL

Zeskamp 1971-1972

Super Final

Event Staged: Saturday 22nd April 1972
Venue: Sportspaleis 'Ahoy' (Ahoy Sports Palace), Zuidwijk,
Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

European Transmissions (Local Timings):
NCRV (NL):
Saturday 22nd April 1972 (Live)

Weather Conditions: Not applicable as event was staged indoors

Teams): IJsselstein v. Ridderkerk v. Venray

Game Results and Standings

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd
3rd

 V • Venray
R Ridderkerk

 I IJsselstein

22
19.5
18.5

The Host Town and Venue

Zuidwijk, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland

Sportspaleis 'Ahoy'

Previously visited in Round 1, Heat 1.

Additional Information

On Tuesday 16th August 2016, members of Dutch team Venray met for a reunion to celebrate their 45th anniversary of participation, organised by local radio station Omroep. The date of their reunion commemorated their first appearance in Dutch Domestic series Zeskamp in 1971 (for the 1972 series of Jeux Sans Frontières).
 

The Venray team of 1971-72 pose for the camera after their 45th anniversary reunion

 

Although full details of the 1971-72 Zeskamp series are currently unavailable, information gleaned from the online article show that the Venray team were informed on Saturday 17th July 1971 that they had been chosen to participate in the series.

Made in Colour • This programme may exist in Dutch Archives

 

JSFnetGB Series Guide pages researched by
Neil Storer and Alan Hayes
with Ischa Bijl, Sébastien Dias, David Hamilton, Denis Kirsanov, Paul Leaver, Philippe Minet,
Christos Moustakas, David Laich Ruiz, Marko Voštan and JSFnet Websites