Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971
West German Domestic Series

Presenter:
Camillo Felgen

Referees:
Hans Ebensberger (Heat 1, 2 and 6)
Peter Hochrath (Heat 3)
Helmut Konrad (Heats 4 and 5)
Werner Treichel (Heat 7)

Assistant Referees:
Hans Ebensberger (Heat 7)
Peter Hochrath (Heats 1, 2, 5 and 6)
Helmut Konrad (Heats 3 and 7)
Werner Treichel (Heats 3, 4 and 6)
Gerd Zieper (Heats 1, 2, 4 and 5)

Games Designer:
Willi Steinberg

Film Editor:
Eva Schmidt

Image Technology:
Hermann-Josef Bremen
Egon Bröse
Horst Rothstein

Lead Camera:
Karlheinz Werner (Heats 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)

Cameras:
Gunter Bading (Heat 5)
Raphael Eisenmann (Heat 5)
Helmut Handschel (Heats 1, 2 and 3)
Otto Heinrich (Heats 1, 2 and 3)
Werner Hoffmann (Heats 1, 2 and 3)
Karl Klein (Heat 5)
Manfred Lück (Heat 5)
Karl Worm (Heats 1, 2 and 3)

Recording:
Carlheinz Schroeter

Production Manager:
Karlheinz Hornung

Producer:
Marita Theile

Director’s Assistant:
Franz Barrenstein

Directors:
Ekkehard Böhmer (Heats 1, 6 and 7)
Günther Hassert (Heat 5)
Helmut Herrmann (Heats 2, 3 and 4)

An ARD-WDR Production

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 1

Event Staged: Saturday 24th April 1971
Venue: Sportplatz Finsterheck (Finsterheck Sports Ground), Oberstein,
Idar-Oberstein, Rheinland-Pfalz, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 24th April 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Peter Hochrath and Gerd Zieper

Weather Conditions:
Overcast with Light Rain and a Strong Breeze

Theme: Legenden, Märchen und Volkshelden (Legends, Fairytales and Folk Heroes)

Teams: Idar-Oberstein v. Rockenhausen

Team Members included:
Idar-Oberstein -
Bernd Cullmann (Team Trainer), Issolde Franks, Brunhilde Germar, Manuela Müller, Gaby Schiffer, Jurgen Walsch, Friedrich Wiederkopf, Joachim Woszinski.

Games: The Seven Swabians, The Seven Ravens, The Brave Little Tailor, The Frog Prince, Mother Hulda, The Seven-League Boots, Lucky Hans, Baron Münchhausen and the Cannonball, The Princess and the Pea, Gulliver and the Lilliputians, The Star Money.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
I-O 2 2 0 4 2 0 2 0 1 0 2
R 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 1 2 0
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
I-O 2 4 4 8 10 10 12 12 13 13 15
R 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 6 7 9 9

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 I-O • Idar-Oberstein
 R Rockenhausen

15
9

Idar-Oberstein qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Riccione, Italy:
staged on Wednesday 9th June 1971

The Host Town

Idar-Obertstein, Rheinland-Pfalz

Idar-Oberstein is a town with a population of around 33,000 inhabitants in the state of Rheinland-Pfalz. It is known as a gemstone and garrison town and is located in the Hunsrück mountain range, 105km (65¼ miles) north of Saarbrücken, 108km (67 miles) west of Frankfurt am Main, 138km (85¾ miles) south of Köln and 51km (31½ miles) due east of the border with neighbouring Luxembourg.

The territorial history of Idar-Oberstein’s individual centres is marked by a considerable splintering of lordly domains in the local area. Only in Napoleonic times, beginning in 1794, with its reorganization and merging of various territorial units, was some order brought to the traditional mishmash of local lordships. However, the Congress of Vienna (1814-1815) brought the future town division once again, as the river Nahe became a border, and the centres on its north bank were thereby grouped into the Principality of Birkenfeld, an exclave of the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, most of whose territory was in what is now north-west Germany, with a coastline on the North Sea.

 

The Felsenkirche stems from legend and is built
into the granite rock face above the town

 

The two towns were originally separate entitities and belonged to the Barons of Daun-Oberstein (who later became the Counts of Falkenstein) until 1670. In 1865, both Idar and Oberstein were granted town rights but in 1933, they were forcibly united (along with the municipalities of Algenrodt and Tiefenstein) by the Nazis to form the modern town of Idar-Oberstein. However, the various Stadtteile (or quarters) have retained their original identities, which aside from the somewhat more urban character encountered in Idar and Oberstein, tend to harken back to each centre’s history as a rural village.

Idar-Oberstein has its connections with the notorious outlaw Johannes Bückler (1777-1803), commonly known as Schinderhannes, who orchestrated one of the most famous crime sprees in German history. He was born at Miehlen, the son of Johann and Anna Maria Bückler. His parents lived in Idar around 1790, where he began an apprenticeship to a tanner. It was not long before he turned to petty theft, stealing some of the skins, but fortunately escaped detention. However, it was at Oberstein where he committed one of his more famous misdeeds in 1796. He spent a whole Louis d'or - a gold coin introduced by Louis XIII (1601-1643) in 1640) - which he had stolen from an innkeeper named Koch from Veitsrodt, on drinks at an inn. The money had meant to be used by Koch to buy a brandy consignment.

The legend of Schinderhannes truly emerged from his escape from a prison tower in Simmern. At the time, the west bank of the Rhine was under French occupation, and the peasantry was happy to celebrate anyone who was able to flout the law. At the end of 1798, Bückler had a rap sheet that included thefts of at least 40 cattle heads and horses. He was arrested by French Gendarmerie forces and brought to a judge, to whom he confessed some of his crimes. Imprisoned in a wooden tower in Simmern that most believed to be impenetrable, he utilized a kitchen knife smuggled in by a sympathetic guard and cut a hole in a small window to escape. The prison escape became widely reported, exciting the public and making Schinderhannes a folk hero.

After things began to get too dangerous for him, Schinderhannes fled across the Rhine and enlisted in the Austrian Army under the assumed name of Jakob Schweikart. He was soon recognised by a former associate and handed over to the French authorities and imprisoned in a tower of the medieval defensive wall of Mainz - the so-called Holzturm. After his mistress Juliana Blasius was threatened with being charged as an accomplice, Schinderhannes testified against his fellow gangsters which led to nineteen of his associates being sentenced to death. Despite his cooperation, Schinderhannes was also sentenced to death as well. On 21st November 1803, he was guillotined outside the gates of Mainz in front of more than 40,000 spectators. He remains Germany's most famous outlaw and his legend still attracts a great deal of tourism to the region where his gang operated.

As well as being renowned as a centre for gemstones, Idar-Oberstein is also famous for the legend of Felsenkirche (Crag Church). According to the legend, there were two noble brothers, Wyrich and Emich, who both fell in love with a beautiful girl named Bertha. The brothers lived at Castle Bosselstein, which stood atop a 135m high hill overlooking the town. Bertha was from a noble line that occupied the nearby Lichtenburg Castle. Neither brother was aware of the other’s feelings for Bertha. When Wyrich, the elder brother, was away on some unknown business, Emich succeeded in securing Bertha’s affections and, subsequently, married her. When Emich announced the news to his brother, Wyrich’s temper got the better of him. In the heat of the moment, he hurled his brother out of a window of the castle and sent him to his death on the rocks below. Wyrich was almost immediately filled with remorse. With the counsel of a local abbot, he began a long period of penance. At this time, Bertha disappears from the historical record. Many romantics feel that she died of a broken heart. As Wyrich waited for a heavenly sign showing that he was forgiven, the abbot suggested that he build a church on the exact place where his brother died. Wyrich worked and prayed himself into exhaustion. However, the moment the church was completed, he received his sign - a miraculous spring opened up in the church. Wyrich died soon after this. When the local bishop came to consecrate the new church, he found the noble lord dead on its steps. Wyrich was later placed in the same tomb with his brother.

In the 1980s, the River Nahe was covered over with a four-lane highway, Bundesstraße 41, putting the river underground, beneath the town. This is unique in Germany and has greatly changed the town’s appearance in this area. The first plans for this development - officially called the Nahehochstraße (Nahe flyover) - lay before planners as early as 1958, but they set off a wave of criticism that was felt far beyond the town’s limits. The project was meant to relieve traffic congestion in the inner town on the B41, which at the time ran through what is now a narrow pedestrian precinct through the middle of the Old Town. Work on the project began in 1980, and lasted five years, after which the Nahehochstraße was completed. The Nahe had thus been channelled into a 2km (1¼ miles) long tunnel. A timber-frame house nearby, the Sachsenhaus, was torn down and put into storage, its pieces numbered. Its reconstruction, to this day, has been indefinitely postponed.

The Venue

Sportplatz Finsterheck

The games, which were themed around legends, fairytales and folklore, were played on a small sports ground located in the eastern suburb of Oberstein.

 

Aerial view of the Sportplatz Finsterheck
which is located in the original town of Oberstein

 

It is home to football team FC Hohl Idar-Oberstein and was founded in 1953 by locals Eugen Bauerfeld, Karl Bohrer, Günter Hahn and Helmut Loch. In recent years the turf has been dug up and replaced with an all-weather pitch.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Seven Swabians

The first game - ‘The Seven Swabians’ (Die Sieben Schwaben) - was played in unison and featured seven male competitors from each team with a very large spear and a 50m (164ft) obstacle course. On the whistle, the team had to begin by bursting four rabbit-shaped balloons, which were attached to the sides of the course, with a nail attached to the tip of the spear. They then had to negotiate a steep incline and, after reaching the base, burst another nine balloons. The next obstacle required the team to burst a pair of large balloons hanging between two tree trunks and then pass between them to burst another 10 balloons on the side of the course. Once all the balloons had been burst, the team had to climb through a hooked rope which was hanging down from the equipment. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Both teams got off to a good start, but the Rockenhausen team did itself no favour after getting the nail stuck in the top of the incline and bending the spearhead which would hinder their progress down the course. The delay permitted Idar-Oberstein to take the lead and from this point it was a one-horse race. Idar-Oberstein completed the game in 1min 13secs and, although the result was already known, the game was permitted to be played out, with Rockenhausen completing the game in 1minute 53 seconds.

The first 2pts were awarded to Idar-Oberstein and they were leading Rockenhausen by 2-0.

Point to note: This was the first of seven games to be based on a fairy tale by the Brothers Jacob (1785-1863) and Wilhelm Grimm (1786-1859). First published in 1812, they were in a collection entitled Kinder und Hausmärchen (Children's and Household Tales) and known in English as Grimm's Fairy Tales.

Inspiration for the Game: The story tells of the adventures of seven Swabians, an ethnic German people who are native to or have ancestral roots in the cultural and linguistic region of Schwaben, which is now mostly divided between the modern states of Baden-Württemberg and Bayern. The first was Herr Schulz, the second Jackli, the third Marli, the fourth Jergli, the fifth Michal, the sixth Hans and the seventh Veitli. All seven had decided to travel throughout the world seeking adventure and performing great deeds. In order to arm themselves and assure their safety, they thought it would be a good thing to have a single, but very strong and very long spear made for them. Together all seven of them took hold of this spear. The bravest and manliest of them was in front and that had to be Herr Schulz. The others followed in order with Veitli bringing up the rear.

One day in the month of July, the seven had walked a long way but still had a good distance to go before reaching the village where they were going to spend the night. They happened across a meadow, just as it was getting dark, and a large beetle or hornet flew by them from behind a bush, buzzing in a threatening manner. Herr Schulz was so frightened that he almost let go of the spear, and a cold sweat broke out over his whole body. He shouted to his comrades that he could hear a drum. Jackli, who was holding the spear behind him, stated that he was also sure that something was there as he could smell the powder and the fuses. Hearing these words, Herr Schulz began to run away and quickly jumped over a fence, landing right on the teeth of a rake that had been left lying there from haymaking. The handle hit him in the face with a tremendous blow. Believing that he had just been hit by an enemy, he screamed that he surrendered and volunteered to be taken prisoner. The other six all jumped toward him, one over the other, screaming the same.

However, with no enemy there to bind them and take them away, they finally saw that they had been deceived. To keep the story from getting out and causing them to look foolish and to be ridiculed, they all swore to one another that they would say nothing about it until one of them should open his mouth by mistake.


Game 2 - The Seven Ravens

The second game - ‘The Seven Ravens’ (Die Sieben Raben) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured a steep greased incline and a male competitor from each team armed with a swatter. At the top of the incline, there were seven balloons representing the seven ravens and, on the whistle, the competitors had to race up the incline to burst the balloons. The team bursting all the balloons in the faster time or the one bursting the greater number would be declared the winners.

Although both competitors set off at a steady rate, all of the bursting was done within the first 34 seconds. After this both of them began to flounder and no further score was achieved. The game ended with Idar-Oberstein bursting 4 balloons and Rockenhausen bursting 2 balloons.

The 2pts were awarded to Offenburg and, with a second successive victory, they were now leading Rockenhausen by 4-0.

Inspiration for the Game: The second game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells of how a peasant has seven sons and no daughter. Finally a daughter is born, but is sickly. The father sends his sons to fetch water for her to be baptized. In their haste, they drop the jug in the well. When they do not return, their father thinks that they have gone off to play and curses them and so they turn into ravens. When the sister is grown, she sets out in search of her brothers. She attempts to get help first from the sun, which is too hot, then the moon, which craves human flesh, and then the morning star. The star helps her by giving her a chicken bone and tells her she will need it to save her brothers. She finds them on the Glass Mountain. However, she realises that she has lost the bone, and chops off a finger to use as a key. She goes into the mountain, where a dwarf tells her that her brothers will return. She takes some of their food and drink and leaves a ring from home in a cup. When her brothers return, she hides. They turn back into human form and ask who has been at their food. The youngest brother finds the ring, and hopes it is their sister, in which case they are saved. She emerges and they return home.


Game 3 - The Brave Little Tailor

The third game - ‘The Brave Little Tailor’ (Das Tapfere Schneiderlein) - was played individually over 3mins 30secs duration and featured three male competitors from each team, two were inside a unicorn costume and the other dressed as a tailor. On the narrow 50m (164ft) raised course, there were four large upright tree trunks set on castors with the nearest to the unicorn having a large hole three-quarters up its length. On the whistle, the unicorn had to be directed forward and place its horn into the hole and then push the four trees down the course. This had to be carried out at a slow pace because the trees were not tethered together and they would be moving independently of each other. The tailor was able to assist by guiding the trees along with ropes bound around the circumference of the trunk and ensuring that they stayed within the confines of the game. After the team had successfully reached the end of the course, the tailor moved the trees to the other side of the course for the return journey. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The home team of Idar-Oberstein participated first and completed their outward journey in 1min 09secs. However, the return journey proved to be a more difficult task with the trees constantly coming out of line and delaying the team. With 15m (49ft 2½in) still to cover and just 40 seconds remaining, it became a test of nerve as to whether the team would complete the game within time. Despite the home crowd urging them on, the team were unfortunate and failed to complete the game. The second heat saw Rockenhausen participate and the tailor was not as adept as his rival at keeping the trees in position. This resulted in the team not reaching the end of the course until 1 minute 51 seconds had elapsed and were already 42 seconds behind the home team at this point. As was the case in the first heat, Rockenhausen was unable to complete the game and it ended in a non-scoring draw.

With both teams unable to complete the game, no points were awarded and the scores remained at 4-0 in Idar-Oberstein’s favour.

Inspiration for the Game: The third game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells of a tailor who manages to deceive everybody with his cunning and by others’ ignorance. The tailor is preparing to eat some jam, but when flies settle on it, he kills seven of them with one blow of his hand. He makes a belt describing the deed, reading ‘Seven at One Blow’. Inspired, he sets out into the world to seek his fortune. The tailor meets a giant who assumes that ‘Seven at One Blow’ refers to seven men. The giant challenges the tailor. When the giant squeezes water from a boulder, the tailor squeezes milk, or whey, from cheese. The giant throws a rock far into the air, and it eventually lands. The tailor counters the feat by tossing a bird that flies away into the sky and the giant believes the small bird is a rock which is thrown so far that it never lands.

The tailor enters royal service, but the other soldiers are afraid that he will lose his temper someday, and then seven of them might die with every blow. They tell the king that either the tailor leaves military service or they will. Afraid of being killed for sending him away, the king instead attempts to get rid of the tailor by sending him to defeat two giants along with a hundred horsemen, offering him half his kingdom and his daughter's hand in marriage if the tailor succeeds. By throwing rocks at the two giants while they sleep, the tailor provokes the pair into fighting until they kill each other, at which time the tailor cuts a small mark near the giants' hearts.

The king, surprised the tailor has returned, sends him after a unicorn, another seemingly impossible task, but the tailor traps it by standing before a tree, so that when the unicorn charges, he steps aside and it drives its horn into the trunk. The king subsequently sends him after a wild boar, but the tailor traps it in a chapel with a similar luring technique. Duly impressed, the king relents, marries the tailor to the princess, and makes the tailor the ruler of half the original kingdom. The tailor's new wife hears him talking in his sleep and realizes with fury that he was merely a tailor and not a noble hero. Upon the princess's demands, the king promises to have him killed or carried off. A squire warns the tailor, who pretends to be asleep, and but then calls out that he has done all these deeds and is not afraid of the men behind the door. Terrified, they leave, and the king does not try to assassinate the tailor again. The tailor lives out his days as a king in his own right.


Game 4 - The Frog Prince

The fourth game - ‘The Frog Prince’ (Der Froschkönig) - was a very short game played in unison and it witnessed the home team of Idar-Oberstein presenting their Joker for play. It featured a male competitor from each team dressed in a frog prince costume with his ankles manacled together and wearing green gloves. On the whistle, the competitors had to hop down the 25m (82ft) course pushing a large gold ball with the nose of the frog to his princess located at the other end. After 23m (75ft 5½in), the frog was permitted to pick up the ball and run the final 2m (6ft 6¾in) and hand it over to his team-mate The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, it was apparent that this would be a one horse-race with the home team completing the game in just 31 seconds. Although the Rockenhausen competitor continued on despite the cheer of the home crowd, he was eventually stopped in his tracks by assistant referee Gerd Zieper.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Idar-Oberstein and they were now leading Rockenhausen by 8-0.

Points to Note: (a) The home team trainer and presenter of the team’s Joker was Olympic athlete Bernd Cullmann. Born in Idar-Oberstein on 11th October 1939, he was a gem cutter by profession and won a gold medal along with fellow runners Armin Hary, Walter Mahlendorf and Martin Lauer in the 4×100m relay at the XVIIth Summer Olympic Games staged in Roma, Italy in 1960. Although the German team finished second behind the American team and equalling its own world record of 39.5 seconds in the process, the Americans were later disqualified for an incorrect exchange and the German team were promoted to the gold-winning position.

(b): An hilarious moment occurred before the start of the game when presenter Camillo Felgen pointed out to the crowd and viewers at home, that the ident display on the home team’s costume (I-O) actually represented Idar-Oberstein and not the score 1-0.

Inspiration for the Game: The fourth game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells the story of a princess that loses her golden ball in a pond. A frog offers to help the princess in return for her friendship, and the princess agrees. But after the princess gets her golden ball, she runs back to the castle without the frog. Later, the frog appears at the castle, and expects to sit and eat with the princess. She doesn’t like the idea, but her father, the king, says she must keep her promise to the frog. After the meal, the frog asks to sleep next to the princess. The idea repulses the princess, but once again, the king makes his daughter live up to her word. However, when they are up in the princess’s room, she is so disgusted with the idea of having the frog sleep in her bed that she violently throws the frog against the bedroom wall. With that, the frog turns into a prince and reveals that he has been under a witch’s spell. In the end, the prince and the princess marry and ride a carriage back to the prince’s kingdom. The carriage is driven by the prince’s servant, Iron Henry, who had bars put around his breaking heart when his master was put under the witch’s spell. The bands break apart because Henry is so happy to have his master return. Henry’s loyalty is quite different from the princess’s selfishness. But eventually the king teaches her how important it is to always keep your word, even when you don’t really want to. It should be noted that in modern versions of the story, the transformation is invariably triggered by the princess kissing the frog.


Game 5 - Mother Hulda

The fifth game - ‘Mother Hulda’ (Frau Holle) - was played in unison over 3mins 30secs duration and featured a female competitor from each team with an oversized duvet filled with duck and goose down. On the whistle, the competitor had to run a short distance to an empty duvet cover and place the duvet inside. Although sounding easy to accomplish, it should be pointed out that the duvet measured 3m2 (9ft 10in2) and was filled with 75kg (165lb 4oz) of down. The competitor then had to secure the cover with two zips. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Although this was a straightforward and simple game, it was enjoyable to watch as the competitors struggled with the large duvet and cover. The light breeze blowing across the arena did nothing to assist them. Not only did it hinder the stability of the duvet cover but also sent thousands of feathers flying into the air, recreating the wintry fairytale scene on which the game was based. Throughout the game, the Rockenhausen competitor appeared to have the edge on her rival and that the team would secure their first points of the competition. However, at the very last moment, the Idar-Oberstein competitor grabbed victory from under her nose by being better adept at zipping up the cover. The times declared showed how closely matched the two were, with Idar-Oberstein finishing in 2 minutes 54 seconds and Rockenhausen finishing in 2 minutes 55 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Idar-Oberstein and it was beginning to look like whitewash victory as they were now leading Rockenhausen by 10-0.

Inspiration for the Game: The fifth game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells how a widow had two daughters, one beautiful and industrious, the other ugly and lazy. She greatly favoured the ugly girl because she was her own daughter. The other one had to do all the work and be the Cinderella of the house. Every day, the poor girl had to sit by a well next to the highway and spin so much that her fingers bled. One day the reel was completely bloody, so she dipped it in the well to wash it off, but it dropped out of her hand and fell in. She cried and ran home to her stepmother telling her of the mishap. She scolded her sharply and was so merciless that she told her that as she must recover it from the well.

When the girl went back, she did not know what to do but, although terrified, she jumped into the well and lost consciousness. When she awoke and came to, she found herself in a beautiful meadow where the sun was shining and there were thousands of flowers. She walked across the meadow and came to an oven full of bread. The loaves called out for her to take them out of the oven or they would burn. She stepped up to it and with a baker's peel took everything out, one loaf after the other. After that she walked further and came to a tree laden with apples. The tree cried out for her to shake it because all its apples were ripe. She shook the tree until the apples fell as though it were raining apples. When none were left in the tree, she gathered them into a pile and then continued on her way.

Finally she came to a small house. An old woman was peering out from inside. She had very large teeth, which frightened the girl, and she wanted to run away. But the old woman called out to her to not be afraid. She told her that her name was Mother Hulda and if she stayed there do the housework in an orderly fashion, things would go well for her. But she warned her that she must take care to make the bed correctly and shake it diligently until the feathers flew. Because the old woman spoke so kindly to her, the girl took heart, agreed, and started in her service. The girl took care of everything to Frau Holle's satisfaction and always shook her featherbed vigorously until the feathers flew about like snowflakes. Thereafter she had a good life with no angry words and enjoyed boiled or roast meat every day.

The festival of Frau Holle is celebrated on 25th December and it is said that when the snow falls, it is just feathers from Frau Holle's eiderdown as she shakes it out to freshen it up.


Game 6 - The Seven-League Boots

The sixth game - ‘The Seven-League Boots’ (Siebenmeilenstiefel) - was played in unison and witnessed the visiting team of Rockenhausen presenting their Joker for play. It featured a male competitor from each team standing on top of a pair of heavy 1m (3ft 3¼in) high boots. The boots were designed in such a way that instead of the sole pointing downwards from the heel, they pointed upwards so it was only possible to move with the heels touching the ground. On the whistle, the competitor had to hold on to the cloth of the leg of the boot and, keeping his weight on the heel, move down the 50m (164ft) course. If he leant to far forward the boot would topple over sending him tumbling to the ground. A team-mate was on hand to assist him should he suffer any mishap. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Within seconds of the start of the game, the Rockenhausen competitor suffered a mishap and tumbled to the ground and permitted the home team to open up a significant lead. However, whilst the Idar-Oberstein competitor took small secure steps, his rival took larger and faster steps to try and close the deficit. After one minute of elapsed time, the deficit had been closed and both teams were neck and neck. Within seconds, the Rockenhausen team had taken the lead and their first victory of the afternoon was handed to them after the home team competitor lost his rhythm and balance after 1 minute 44 seconds of elapsed time. With just 4m (13ft 1½in) remaining to reach the finishing line, the visiting competitor held his nerve and completed the game in 1 minute 52 seconds.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Rockenhausen and, although they had closed the deficit, they were now trailing Idar-Oberstein by 10-4.

Inspiration for the Game: Seven-league boots are an element in European folklore. The boot allows the person wearing them to take strides of seven leagues per step, resulting in great speed. The boots are often presented by a magical character to the protagonist to aid in the completion of a significant task. From the context of English language, 'seven-league boots' originally arose as a translation from the French bottes de sept lieues, popularised in fairytales written by Charles Perrault (1626-1703). A league (roughly 4.75km or 3 miles) was considered to represent the distance walked in an hour by an average man. If a man were to walk seven hours per day, he would then walk seven leagues, or just under 32km (21 miles).


Game 7 - Lucky Hans

The seventh game - ‘Lucky Hans’ (Hans im Glück) - was played in unison and featured a male competitor from each team and a horse, a cow, a piglet, a plastic goose and a large circular grindstone. On the whistle, the competitor had pick up a large polystyrene nugget of gold and run along a 50m (164ft) corral and dispose of it. He then had to mount a horse and ride it back along the corral to the start line and hand the horse over to a stagehand. He then had to unbolt a pen and lead a young cow along the corral to the other end where he exchanged it for a piglet. He then had to run back to the start once more and hand the piglet over and collect a large plastic goose. After a final run up the corral, he exchanged the goose for a large polystyrene grindstone which he had to roll back to the start. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first run up the corral gave a hint that this might not be Rockenhausen’s day after their competitor failed to dispose of the gold nugget correctly and was sent back to complete the task. This delay permitted the Idar-Oberstein competitor to set off first on the horse and get ahead. However, halfway down the corral his horse stopped and refused to move. In the meantime, his rival had mounted his horse and was racing down towards him. At the same time, the stubborn horse relented and continued its run but was somewhat spooked by the presence of the Rockenhausen horse and jumped into the adjoining corral which impeded the Rockenhausen competitor. With the home team ahead by a few seconds, both competitors released the cows and pulled them by ropes around their necks to the end of the course. Whilst the visiting competitor struggled to get hold of his piglet, the Idar-Oberstein competitor raced back to the start with his. After handing over the piglet, he grabbed the goose and raced back down the course. With a huge deficit to recover, it was all over for the Rockenhausen team. A final run with the grindstone secured victory for Idar-Oberstein finishing, the game in 2 minutes 11 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Idar-Oberstein and they were now leading Rockenhausen 12-4. With just four games to be played and a maximum 8pts available, the best that the visitors could hope for was a draw.

Point to Note: If played today, this game would raise a great number of complaints and protests from animals’ rights activists. The horses were clearly frightened by the noise of the crowd and the cows were in a similar frame of mind after being pulled against their will along the corral. The cruellest act was on the piglet which appeared to be crying in pain when the home team competitor grabbed hold of one of its front legs in order to keep hold of it!

Inspiration for the Game: The sixth game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells of a young man called Hans who works hard for seven years but wishes to return to see his poor mother. His master pays him his wages which amounts to a lump of gold the size of his head. Hans puts the gold in a handkerchief and starts out on his journey but soon becomes tired. He spots a rider on horseback and seeing the ease at which the horse travels, he offers to exchange his lump of gold for the horse.

Happy with the exchange, the man gives him the horse and Hans rides off. The horse bolts and Hans gets bucked off, whereupon he meets a shepherd who convinces Hans to trade his horse for a cow, telling Hans that a cow can provide milk, cheese and butter and is more leisurely company. Hans takes up the offer and continues his journey only to find that the cow is dry and not producing any milk as he had been told. Disgruntled with the cow, Hans meets a butcher who gives him a pig for the cow. Thanking the butcher for the pig, Hans sets off again hopeful that he has now found an ideal travel companion. Alas, Hans meets a countryman who informs him that the pig's owner is the squire and he is in danger of being arrested for taking the squire's pig. Hans takes the countryman's goose in exchange for his pig, happy that it will provide a good roast and a supply of goose fat.

At his next stop in a village, Hans meets a scissor-grinder and explains his story to him. The scissor-grinder offers him a grindstone for his goose arguing that a grindstone will provide a source of income. Hans happily exchanges the goose for the grindstone. He continues on his way, but is tired carrying the grindstone and is short of money for food. Hans stops for a drink on the banks of a river and the grindstone falls into the deep water and is lost. Hans is happy to be rid of the grindstone and being free of all troubles. He walks on to his mother's house and recounts his lucky tale.


Game 8 - Baron Münchhausen and the Cannonball

The eighth game - ‘Baron Münchhausen and the Cannonball’ (Baron Münchhausen und die Kanonenkugel) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team seated atop a giant cannonball which was balanced on either side by a giant leg on castors. On the whistle, the competitor had to lean forward and roll the cannonball down the 50m (164ft) course ensuring that he kept within the confines of the course. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, the Rockenhausen competitor took control of the game and edged his way along the course in a timely manner. Whilst he remained seated, the home competitor could be seen standing up and this ultimately affected the steering ability of the equipment. Although he could be seen in the background protesting, referee Hans Ebensberger, who was standing just a few metres away, would not accept his gestures and permitted the game to continue. The game ended with Rockenhausen crossing the finishing line in 2 minutes 31 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Rockenhausen and they were now trailing Idar-Oberstein by 12-6, but with three games remaining, there was still a slim chance that a draw was possible.

Inspiration for the Game: This game was based on the fictional German character Baron Münchhausen in a book called Baron Münchhausen's Narrative of his Marvellous Travels and Campaigns in Russia published in 1785. He was created by German librarian Rudolf Erich Raspe (1736-1794) after learning of the exploits of real-life baron, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen (1720-1797). However, it is not clear how much of the story material derives from the Baron himself, as it is known that the majority of the stories are based on folktales that had been in circulation for many centuries before Münchhausen's birth. In the stories, narrated by eponymous hero, they imply that he is a superhuman figure who spends most of his time either getting out of absurd predicaments or indulging in equally absurd moments of gentle mischief. In some of his most well-known stories, the Baron rides a cannonball, travels to the Moon, is swallowed by a giant fish in the Mediterranean Sea, saves himself from drowning by pulling on his own hair, fights a 40ft-foot crocodile, enlists a wolf to pull his sleigh, and uses laurel tree branches to fix his horse when the animal is accidentally cut in two!


Game 9 - The Princess and the Pea

The ninth game - ‘The Princess and the Pea’ (Die Prinzessin auf der Erbse) - was played in unison over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured a male competitor from each team assisted by a female team-mate and a giant-sized bed frame with ten large heavy duvets laid on top. Hidden inside the layers of the duvets, there was a total of 45 giant peas and on the whistle, the competitors had to lift the duvets and climb inside to find as many peas as possible. Any that were found had to be handed to their team-mates who placed them in a bowl. The team collecting the greater number of peas within the time would be declared the winners.

The game was played out in a frantic manner and had some hilarious moments when both of the competitors were inside and lifting the layers and moving from one to the other. The Rockenhausen competitor appeared to be more successful at finding the peas and was quite adamant that he would hamper his rival by continually turning the duvets over and over. The game ended and the number of peas by the home team was counted out by the referees and they had collected a total of 16 peas. Whilst the Rockenhausen total was being counted, the competitor looked inside the bowl and began to celebrate holding his arms aloft. However, as the count continued it revealed that they had also collected a total of 16 peas. The game had miraculously ended in a draw.

With both teams achieving a result, they were awarded 1pt each and, with the scores at 13-7 in Idar-Oberstein’s favour, overall victory by the home team had already been secured.

Inspiration for the Game: This game was based on the fairytale of the same name written by Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875) which was first published with three others by Andersen on 8th May 1835. In the story it tells of a prince who wanted to marry a princess, but only a real princess. He travelled all over the world to find one, but nowhere could he find what he wanted. There were many that claimed that they were princesses but it was difficult to find out whether they were real ones. There was always something about them that was not as it should be and so he came home again and was sad. One evening there was a terrible storm with thunder and lightning and the rain pouring down in torrents. Suddenly, there was a knock at the city gates and the old king went to open it and found a young woman standing there. She claimed that she was a princess but the inclement weather had made her look a terrible sight. The water was running down from her hair and clothes and into the toes of her shoes and out again at the heels. When challenged about her claim, she reiterated that she was really was a real princess. Hearing this, the queen thought to herself that she would test her claim and, saying nothing, went into the bedroom and took all the bedding off the bedstead and laid a pea on the bottom. She then took twenty mattresses and laid them on the pea and then twenty eiderdown quilts on top of the mattresses. That night the princess had to lie on top of the bed and in the morning was asked how she had slept. She replied that it had been a very bad night and that she had scarcely closed her eyes. She continued that she was black and blue all over her body because she had been lying on something hard and had no idea why. On hearing this, the royal court knew that her claim was true because only a real princess could be as sensitive to have felt the pea right through the twenty mattresses and eiderdown quilts. The prince took her for his wife, and remained happy knowing that he had found his true love.


Game 10 - Gulliver and the Lilliputians

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘Gulliver and the Lilliputians’ (Gulliver und die Liliputaner) - was played individually over four minutes duration and featured five competitors (three males and two females) from each team. Laid down on ten wooden logs was a 6m (19ft 8¼in) high effigy of Gulliver and on the whistle, the competitors had to move it down the course. Whilst the female competitors stood at each end of the effigy, the male competitors had to move the logs from one end to the other so that it could be rolled along. The head and feet of the effigy had to be supported off the ground at all times, so it was important that the logs were laid down and removed at regular spacings. Once the team had crossed a line at the bottom of the 50m (164ft) course, they had to return to the start in the same manner. The time would be taken once all logs and team members were across the line. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first team to compete was Idar-Oberstein and they reached the halfway mark after 1 minute 42 seconds of elapsed time and finished the game in a total time of 3 minutes 43 seconds. This was followed by Rockenhausen who were slighter faster and reached the halfway mark in 1 minute 21 seconds, finishing the game in a total time of 3 minutes 7 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Rockenhausen and they were now trailing Idar-Oberstein by 13-9.

Inspiration for the Game: This game was based on the book of the same name written by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift (1667-1745). The book, originally with the long-winded title of Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon and then a Captain of Several Ships, begins with his first voyage, which takes place between 4th May 1699 and 13th April 1702. In it, Gulliver is washed ashore after a shipwreck and finds himself a prisoner of a race of tiny people, less than 6 inches (15.25cm) tall, who are inhabitants of the island country of Lilliput. After giving assurances of his good behaviour, he is given a residence in Lilliput and becomes a favourite of the court. From there, the book follows Gulliver's observations on the Court of Lilliput. He is also given the permission to roam around the city on a condition that he must not harm their subjects.


Game 11 - The Star Money

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Star Money’ (Die Sterntaler) - was played in unison over one minute duration and featured a female member of the public representing her respective team. Each of the competitors was supplied with an apron and above the arena there were 200 polystyrene coins hanging from a wire. On the whistle, the coins were released and fell to the ground and the competitors had to collect as many of them in their aprons within the time. The team collecting the greater number of coins would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game saw the home team representative using the better method by holding the apron ends in her mouth and thus freeing her hands to pick up the coins. This proved to be the most beneficial as the results showed that Idar-Oberstein had collected 80 coins whilst Rockenhausen collected 69 coins.

The final 2pts were awarded to the home team and the final scoreboard showed that Idar-Oberstein had beaten Rockenhausen by 15-9.

Inspiration for the Game: The seventh and final game to be based on a Grimm fairytale tells of an unnamed, orphaned girl who is poor and homeless. The only things she has left are her clothing and a loaf of bread that some charitable soul has given her. She is a good-hearted person, however, and as she was thus forsaken by the entire world, she went forth into the open country, trusting in the good God. After meeting a poor hungry man, she gives him the last pieces of the bread, and to three cold children she gives her cap, her jacket, and her dress. In a forest, she sees a naked child begging for clothes, and since it was dark and could not be seen, she gives her own smock away. As she stands with nothing left at all, suddenly some stars fall to earth before her. They are nothing else but hard smooth pieces of money called thalers (silver coins), and although she had just given her little shirt away, she had a new one which was of the very finest linen. Then she gathered together the money into this, and was rich all the days of her life.

Additional Information

The final game in this year’s competition was played by members of the audience. Towards the end of each competition, presenter Camillo Felgen would ask for members of the audience from each of the competing towns to volunteer to participate for their respective teams. These were either all male or female, dependant on the venue and game involved. The burgermeisters of the competing towns were then asked to select which one(s) of the volunteers would participate for their opponents.

This heat celebrated the both the 25th Domestic Spiel Ohne Grenzen programme since 1967 and the 75th Spiel Ohne Grenzen transmission (Domestic and International) being broadcast on West German television.

Made in Colour • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 2

Event Staged: Saturday 1st May 1971
Venue: Platanenallee (Avenue of Plane Trees), Offenburg,
Baden-Württemberg, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 1st May 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Peter Hochrath and Gerd Zieper

Weather Conditions:
Overcast with Intermittent Rain

Theme: Züge (Trains)

Teams: Goslar im Harz v. Offenburg

Team Members included:
Offenburg -
Dieter Roth (Team Trainer), Hubert Beathalter, Christian Blender, Christel Käshammer, Artur Köchlin, Ellen Mundingen.

Games: Resetting the Signals, The Travellers, The Baggage Handlers, Examining the Tickets, The Electric Carts, The Railway Station Clock, The Destination Boards, Transporting the Luggage, The Uncoupled Carts, All Aboard!, Suitcases, Suitcases, Suitcases!

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
G 0 2 1 1 0 4 0 1 0 2 0
O 2 0 1 1 4 0 2 1 2 0 2
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
G 0 2 3 4 4 8 8 9 9 11 11
O 2 2 3 4 8 8 10 11 13 13 15

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 O • Offenburg
 G Goslar im Harz

15
11

Offenburg qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Offenburg, West Germany:
staged on Wednesday 4th August 1971

The Host Town

Offenburg, Baden-Württemberg

Offenburg is a town with a population of around 60,000 inhabitants in the Schwarzwald (Black Forest) in the state of Baden-Württemberg. It is located 38km (23½ miles) south-west of Baden-Baden, 97km (60¼ miles) west of Stuttgart, 127km (79 miles) north-west of Konstanz and just 18km (11 miles) east of the River Rhein and the French border city of Strasbourg.

 

The colourful Rathaus (Town Hall) of Offenburg
with its rotating bronze birdman statues

 

Offenburg was first mentioned in historical documents dating from 1148. By 1240, Offenburg had already been declared a Free Imperial City. In September 1689, the city, with the exception of two buildings, was totally destroyed during the Nine Years’ War (1688-1697) by French troops. Due to the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and the reorganization of the German states in 1803 by Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), Offenburg lost its status as a Free Imperial City and fell under the rule of the Grand Duchy of Baden.

During World War I (1914-1918), Offenburg was one of the first cities to experience the effects from aerial bombardment, the operations against the Offenburg railway sidings mostly being flown by aircraft from the Independent Force (strategic bombing squad) out of Ochey aerodrome in eastern France. It is a mostly forgotten fact that in the aftermath of World War I, during the Occupation of the Ruhr (1923-1925), French troops had occupied Offenburg as it fell within the perimeter of the Kehl bridgehead. The French occupation forces entered the town in February 1923 and stayed until 1924.

Most of the buildings in the town are colourful and picturesque and the same can be said of the Baroque-style Town Hall located at the junction of Hauptstraße and Fischmarkt. Dating back to 1741, the building bears the town’s coat of arms above the front balcony and an Austrian double-headed eagle under a flat gable. In recent years, the children’s play area outside the Town Hall has become so popular, that the excessive usage of the rotating ‘birdmen’ had worn out the ball-bearings on which they sit. According to the town’s records, the statues had to be lifted by a crane to change the defective parts, at a cost of approximately 1,600 Euro (£1,200).

The name of the town literally means ‘open castle’ (from offen and burg) and this is represented on the town’s coat of arms showing open gates. The town is one of a unique few that are twinned with one of its own nation (Altenburg). It is also twinned with Borehamwood, Hertfordshire in Great Britain.

The Venue

Platanenallee

This games were played on a small tarmacked area located directly north of the main railway line between Platanenallee and the west bank of the Kinzig river.

 

An aerial view of the redeveloped Platanenallee venue location

 

The area today has been redeveloped and is now a small cul-de-sac of 14 houses and a large warehouse (centre of above photograph) stands on the majority of the playing arena.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - Resetting the Signals

The first game - ‘Resetting the Signals’ (Rücksetzen der Signale) - was played individually over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured five male competitors from each team and a large wooden train engine with hamster-cage styled wheels. Four of the competitors started the game inside each of the wheels whilst the fifth was in the driver’s cab and armed with a long pole. On the whistle, the four in wheels had to walk forward to rotate them and set the train in motion around a meandering course. The competitors in the front two wheels were responsible for the steering which was achieved by reducing the speed of one of the wheels when approaching bends in order that the engine would turn into the direction of play. At four given points around the course, there was a signal arm set at a right angle, denoting that the train could go no further. In order for the team to progress, the driver had to release a cable which was connected to the signal by using a long pole and, once accomplished, the signal would rise and permit the train to move on. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Goslar im Harz and the team suffered just one mishap during their circumnavigation of the course. Approaching the final signal, the team were travelling too fast to turn the engine and crashed into the signal pole and had to reverse and reposition. However, the team quickly recomposed itself and finished the game in 1 minute 57 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of Offenburg and they were slightly faster than their rivals, but as was the case in the first heat, the team suffered a mishap at the final signal and had to reposition itself before continuing. Nevertheless, the lead that they had acquired during the earlier stages of the game, resulted in them finishing in 1 minute 48 seconds.

The first 2pts were awarded to Offenburg and they were leading Goslar im Harz by 2-0.


Game 2 - The Travellers

The second game - ‘The Travellers’ (Die Reisenden) - was played in unison over a 50m (82ft) course and featured two competitors (one male and one female) from each team with a children’s pram, a set of six suitcases and a long-haired dachshund.

On the whistle, the male competitor had to push the pram in front of him whilst using his other hand to hold aloft a wooden plank supporting the suitcases. The other end of the plank was held aloft by the wife whilst walking the dog on a leash with her other hand. When reaching the ‘border’ crossing, the necessary travel documents had to be produced from two of the suitcases (the identity of which were unknown to the competitors) and shown to the customs officer and the dog had to be put into isolation (handed over to the authorities). Once the documents had been validated, the pram and plank had to be lifted off the ground, and the competitors had to climb some steps and cross a podium and back down another set of steps and run 30m (98ft 5in) to their holiday destination. Once the team had arrived, the female returned across the podium to the custom’s officer to retrieve their pet dog and then back over the podium to the destination. The pair with dog in tow, then had to carry the plank and suitcases and race back down to the start of the game and unload the suitcases on to a porter’s cart and get on board to finish the game. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Both teams reached the ‘border’ together but Offenburg produced their documents from the cases first and carried on. In the meantime, there appeared to be somewhat of a delay with the Goslar im Harz team producing their documentation. Whilst one of the documents had been found and validated, the second could not be found in the suitcases. Whilst the Offenburg continued with the game, unaware what was occurring behind them, referee Hans Ebensberger blew the whistle to stop the game after 50 seconds of elapsed time. It was at this point, it was explained that the production staff had omitted to put a second document into one of the visiting team’s suitcases and the game would have to be restarted. This was met with displeasure from the two Offenburg competitors and a hail of whistles and boos from the home crowd. The game was restarted and Offenburg took an early lead but disaster struck the team after five of the suitcases tumbled to the ground as they climbed the steps. This permitted the visitors to take control of the game with Goslar im Harz arriving at their destination in 1 minute 18 seconds. In the meantime, the Offenburg team had recomposed itself and reached the same point in 1 minute 24 seconds. However, the time lost caused by the disaster could not be recouped and Goslar im Harz finished the game in 1 minute 46 seconds with Offenburg finishing in 1 minute 54 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Goslar im Harz and the scores were level at 2-2.

Point to Note: Eagle-eyed viewers would note that presenter Camillo Felgen referred to the dachshund as Waldi. This was a reference to the first-ever official mascot to be used at an Olympic Games and scheduled to be staged at München, West Germany in 1972.


Game 3 - The Baggage Handlers

The third game - ‘The Baggage Handlers’ (Die Gepäckabfertiger) - was played individually over five rounds and featured three male competitors from each team armed with 10 large boxes and 28 sacks standing behind a barrier. Standing 5m (16ft 5in) in front of them, there were two male team members in opposition and an open railway wagon on tracks. On the whistle, the opposition had to push the wagon up the tracks whilst the competitors hurled the boxes and sacks at it. Any items that landed inside the wagon were removed at the other end of the track and the wagon was pushed back to the start and the game repeated on four occasions. There was no limit to the number of items thrown in each round and only items delivered to the end of the course would be counted. The team with the greater number of luggage items in total would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Goslar im Harz and on the first run they failed to score despite throwing a total of six boxes at the wagon. On the second run they fared better, securing 2 boxes and 1 sack from a total of seven items actually thrown (four boxes and three sacks). With all the ten boxes now disposed of, it just left sacks to throw and on the third run, the team threw a total of nine sacks with 4 of them (running total of 7) landing inside the wagon. On the fourth run, a further eight sacks were thrown but only 2 of them landed securely in the wagon (running total of 9). On the fifth run, the final seven sacks were thrown with 4 of them landing inside the wagon, giving a total of 13 items (2 boxes and 11 sacks). The second heat saw Offenburg participate and on the first run, as was the case with Goslar im Harz, they also failed to score. Although two of the boxes from the seven thrown landed in the wagon, neither of them were deemed as scoring as the wagon had been blocked from completing its journey by a box landing on the tracks. On the second run, the team secured 2 boxes from a total of six items thrown (three boxes and three sacks). On the third run, the team threw six sacks with 4 of them (running total of 6) landing in the wagon. On the penultimate run, a further seven sacks were thrown but only 2 of them counted (running total of 8). On the final run and with eleven sacks available to throw, the team secured 5 sacks from seven thrown, giving a total of 13 items (1 box and 12 sacks). The game had ended in a draw.

With both teams achieving the same total, they were awarded 1pt each and the scores remained level at 3-3.


Game 4 - Examining the Tickets

The fourth game - ‘Examining the Tickets’ (Prüfung die Fahrkarten) - was played in unison over one minute duration and featured a male competitor from each team armed with a giant pair of hole-punching clippers. On the course, there was a line of 18 giant train tickets connected in pairs in an inverted ‘V’ shape to form a concertina. On the whistle, the competitor had to punch a hole in one of the tickets and then pass through the inverted ‘V’ in order to do the same to the ticket on the opposite side. He then repeated the game until all of the 18 tickets had been clipped. Once accomplished, he had to dispose of the clippers and push against the 18th ticket and run back to the start compressing the concertina as he went. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset it was neck and neck all the way with both competitors punching their final holes at the exact same time. This continued with the run back to the start with both competitors finishing in 34 seconds and the game ended in a draw.

With both teams achieving a result, they were awarded 1pt each and the scores remained level at 4-4.


Game 5 - The Electric Carts

The fifth game - ‘The Electric Carts’ (Die Electro Karren) - was played in unison over four minutes duration and witnessed the home team of Offenburg presenting their Joker for play. It featured a male competitor from each team and an electric porter’s cart with a small cart attached at the front. On the whistle, the competitor had to steer the vehicle through a slalom course of three open gates in order to reach the far end of the playing area where the 28 sacks and 10 large boxes utilised in the third game were stored. Once he arrived, he had to load 10 sacks onto the small cart and then return to the start in the same manner, but in reverse gear. Once he reached the start line, he disposed of the sacks and repeated the game, bringing up to 10 items back to the start on each journey. Any items falling to the ground whilst in transit could not be recovered. The team completing the game in the faster time or the one with the greater number of items collected would be declared the winners.

From the outset, the game was a one-horse race with the Offenburg competitor reaching the storage area in 20 seconds whilst his opponent was just traversing the third gate at the time. After completing the return journey and disposing of the items in 1 minute 4 seconds, Offenburg set off for their second run. In the meantime, the visitors were having some difficulty in traversing the course in reverse and completed his first run in 1 minute 28 seconds. Offenburg completed their second return journey in 2 minutes 8 seconds and set off for the third whilst Goslar im Harz was still loading his cart at the other end of the course on his second run. Although the visitors successfully completed the run in 2 minutes 55 seconds, Offenburg were already returning on their third. Despite the fact that Offenburg dropped a sack and a box during this run, it made little difference to the result. Goslar im Harz were far enough behind that they would not complete their third run and emulate the home team’s score. Nevertheless, Offenburg began a fourth run after 3 minutes 28 seconds of elapsed time whilst Goslar im Harz began their third return journey after 3 minutes 45 seconds. But time was not on their side and halfway down the course, the final whistle was sounded. Offenburg had collected 28 items whilst Goslar im Harz had only collected 20 items.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Offenburg and they were now leading Goslar im Harz by 8-4.


Game 6 - The Railway Station Clock

The sixth game - ‘The Railway Station Clock’ (Die Bahnhofsuhr) - was played individually over one minute duration and witnessed the visiting team of Goslar im Harz presenting their Joker for play. It featured a male competitor from each team inside a hamster exercise wheel inset at the base of a large clock. The wheel was connected via cogs and belts to the actual hands of the clock. On the whistle, with the hands of the clock showing 12 noon, the competitor had run inside the wheel in order to move the hands forward in time. The team advancing the hands of the clock the greater distance would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of the Offenburg competitor who ran a steady pace throughout the duration and was able to advance the hands 10 hours and 25 minutes. The second heat saw the participation of Goslar in Harz and their competitor stormed the game, emulating the home team’s score after just 47 seconds of elapsed time. In the remaining 13 seconds, he advanced the clock a further 2 hours and 35 minutes, bringing their total clocked time to 13 hours exactly.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Goslar im Harz and the scores were level at 8-8.


Game 7 - The Destination Boards

The seventh game - ‘The Destination Boards’ (Die Bestimmungsort Bretter) - was played in unison and featured a female competitor from each team dressed as a stationmaster and standing inside a sack. On a high scaffold at the end of the 10m (32ft 9¾in) course, there was a large destination board with six compartments and hanging from the base of the board were six ropes. On the whistle, the competitor had to jump up the course and pull on the first rope to reveal the letters of the team’s name. She then had to jump back up the course to circumnavigate a small sign and repeat the game until all letters were revealed. The visiting team revealed one letter at a time (G, O, S, L, A and R) whilst the home team, whose name comprised nine characters, revealed a combination of letters (OF, FE, NB, U, R and G). The team displaying their name in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, it was a closely run contest, with the Offenburg competitor having the edge and leading throughout. On her second run, despite having only pulled on the second rope, the third combination of letters (NB) was also revealed. The referees stepped in to inform her that she had to imitate pulling on the third rope on her next run to ensure parity. The game ended with Offenburg completing the game in 47 seconds with Goslar im Harz finishing in 51 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Offenburg and they were now leading Goslar im Harz by 10-8.


Game 8 - Transporting the Luggage

The eighth game - ‘Transporting the Luggage’ (Das Gepäcktransport) - was played individually over six runs and featured two male competitors from each team armed with a porter’s cart loaded with five suitcases of varying size. In opposition, there were five male competitors hanging from the seats of children’s swings. On the whistle, the first competitor had to run with his cart across the path of the opposition whilst they attempted to remove as many of the cases with their feet. Any case that was not removed was placed on a podium on the other side of the course. This was repeated by the second competitor and by both on two further occasions. The team with the greater number of cases on the podium would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Offenburg and on the first run had one case remaining on the cart. The second run proved just as fruitful, giving the team a running total of 2, although it appeared at first glance that there were three cases on the cart when it reached the safety of the other side. The other two were deemed by the referees to have been hit by the opposition and caught on the handle of the cart during its journey. The third run saw all the cases removed from the cart but the fourth run proved as fruitful as the first two runs, giving a running total of 3. The fifth run proved disastrous for the home team when one of the cases fell backwards and off the cart by its own volition, resulting in the competitor losing his footing and giving the opposition extra time to remove all the cases. The sixth run proved just as fruitless for Offenburg after they were somewhat hindered by the opposition. On the backward swing, a Goslar im Harz member got his foot entangled with the cart’s handle, bringing it to an abrupt halt, and permitted extra time for all the cases to be removed. The referees stated that his actions had not been intentional and confirmed the score as 3 cases. The second heat saw the participation of Goslar im Harz with Offenburg in opposition and they were determined that their score would not be beaten. On the first run, the Goslar im Harz team had one case remaining on the cart. Despite some delaying tactics on the second run, they found themselves with an empty cart, giving them a running total of 1. The third, fourth and fifth runs proved just as fruitless as the second and the team entered the last run requiring at least two cases to draw the game. Fortunately for the team, one of the cases hit by the opposition did not fall to the ground and remained on the cart whilst another was missed entirely. Referee Hans Ebensberger stated that both cases were deemed as good and that the game ended in a 3-3 draw.

With both teams achieving a result, they were awarded 1pt each and Offenburg were now leading Goslar im Harz by 11-9.


Game 9 - The Uncoupled Carts

The ninth game - ‘The Uncoupled Carts’ (Der Ungekoppelten Karren) - was played in unison and featured six male competitors from each team. Five of the competitors were standing on wheeled podium whilst the sixth was sitting in a small electric car. On the whistle, the car had to be driven down a 50m (164ft) course with the five podiums in tow. However, only the first podium was attached to the car whilst the other four had to be held together by the competitors linking hands. Halfway down the course, the team had to circumnavigate a road sign and then when they reached the end of the course had to repeat the course for the return journey. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

A straightforward uneventful game saw the home team finishing in 1 minute 1 second whilst the visitors finished in 1 minute 3 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Offenburg and they were now leading Goslar im Harz by 13-9. The best outcome that the visitors could now hope for was a draw, but they would need to win the final two games.


Game 10 - All Aboard!

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘All Aboard!’ (Alle an Bord!) - was played in unison and featured eleven male competitors from each team, 14 suitcases and an empty railway coach with three windows. On the whistle, ten of the competitors had to board the coach via the middle window and once inside, the eleventh handed the team the suitcases. Once accomplished, he then climbed into the coach and the window was closed. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

This was a very simple, fast-moving and quickly executed game with Goslar im Harz having the edge over Offenburg, finishing the game in just 41 seconds with Offenburg finishing in 43 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Goslar im Harz and they were now trailing Offenburg by 13-11 with just the final game to play.


Game 11 - Suitcases, Suitcases, Suitcases!

The eleventh and final game - ‘Suitcases, Suitcases, Suitcases!’ (Koffer, Koffer, Koffer!) - was played in unison and featured a female member of the public representing her respective team. Located on the ground adjacent to her was a pile of 10 suitcases of varying size and on the whistle, the representatives had to fit six of them inside of each other akin to Russian dolls. Although there were ten cases only six would fit perfectly with the other four having the same dimensions as others.

Another straightforward game saw the Offenburg representative faring better and finished the game in 1 minute 13 seconds whilst her rival had only placed five inside each other.

The final 2pts were awarded to the home team and the final scoreboard showed that Offenburg had beaten Goslar im Harz by 15-11.

Made in Colour • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 3

Event Staged: Saturday 8th May 1971
Venue: Parkbad (Town Park Swimming Pool), Stadtpark (Town Park),
Schwabach, Bayern, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 8th May 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Peter Hochrath, Helmut Konrad and Werner Treichel

Weather Conditions:
Hot and Sunny

Theme: Ein Dschungel Abenteuer (A Jungle Adventure)

Teams: Schorndorf v. Schwabach

Team Members included:
Schwabach -
Rainer Leuthold (Co-Team Trainer), Werner Schrödel (Co-Team Trainer), Hans Zuleeg (Co-Team Trainer), Hans Beil, Heide Blank, Hermann Botz, Walter Döll, Helmut Gerhardt, Werner Großer, Karl Haag, Günther Häring, Werner Kammerloher, Hans Katheder, Ilse Katheder, Karl-Heinz Kaufmann, Erika Kommenda, Herbert Rößner, Walter Ryschka, Helmut Schindler, Manfred Seifert, Helmut Steinbauer.

Games: Tarzan: King of the Jungle, Flowers of Paradise, Catching Butterflies, The Father Ape, The Safari Baggage, The Friendly Turtles, The Woodland Animal, The Tree Tower, The Safari Expedition, The Giant Water Snake, The Coconuts.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
SA 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 2 2 4 0
SO 4 2 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
SA 0 0 2 4 4 6 6 8 10 14 14
SO 4 6 6 6 8 8 10 10 10 10 12

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 SA • Schwabach
 SO Schorndorf

14
12

Schwabach qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Solothurn, Switzerland:
staged on Wednesday 23rd June 1971

The Host Town

Schwabach, Bayern

Schwabach is a town with a population of around 40,000 inhabitants in the state of Bayern. It is located in the centre of the historic Duchy of Franconia, 14km south of Nürnberg, 139km north of München, 148km north-west of Stuttgart and 243km south-east of Leipzig. Although there had been settlements in the area since 750 BC, it was not until the 14th century that the current city walls were built. Municipal law was established in 1371 and the town was celebrating its 600th anniversary at the time of transmission.

The name of the town derives from the old Franconian Suapaha (later Suabaha, then Villa Suabach) which translates as ‘Schwaben-Bach’ in modern German, meaning ‘Swabian stream’. The first part of the name was given by the Franconians, who came to the area about a millennium after the Hallstatt culture (a predominant Central European culture dating from the 8th to 6th centuries BC), to the people living on the banks of that stream, which were perceived as Swabians by them, while the second part is a reference to the stream which flows through town.

 

The colourful Rathaus (Town Hall) of Schwabach
dates back to the 16th century

 

Schwabach is famous for its manufacture of sewing machine needles - the first factory being established there in 1633 - and its crafts made of gold, and in particular those covered in gold foil. Much of the foil used to decorate London landmarks such as Buckingham Palace and the Albert Memorial stems from Schwabach. In 2004, the town celebrated this tradition with an anniversary festival entitled ‘500 Jahre Goldfolie in Schwabach’ (500 years of gold foil in Schwabach). It also gives its name to the Schwabacher font (a hard black-letter typeface), developed around 1500 by a local typesetter, and used for printing the first bible in German translation. The Town Hall, built in 1528, and the oldest church, built in 1469, are both still in use today, and the landmark Old Linden Tree, planted in 1768, still grows strong.

The Venue

Parkbad

The games were themed around a jungle adventure and played in the Parkbad located within the town’s Stadtpark.

 
The Parkbad pictured during its heyday years
 

Opened on 12th July 1938, it was considered to be one of the most beautiful baths of Franken (Franconia). However, despite its instant popularity there was very little re-investment after its heyday years, and by the late 1980s, the baths had fallen into disrepair and had become a risk to public health. Although the pool remained open, it faced an uncertain future, but following some rethinking by local councillors and backing by investors, the park has received a complete makeover in recent years and is no longer recognisable from its former years.

 
The pool today bears no resemblance to its past
 

Additional facilities have been added including water-slides, fountains and family-friendly areas and it has now become one of the town’s most popular summer rendezvous for locals and tourists alike. The Parkbad, which is open between April and September each year, celebrated its 75th birthday in 2013, culminating in a colourful programme of festivities on Saturday 20th July.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - Tarzan: King of the Jungle

The first game - ‘Tarzan: King of the Jungle’ (Tarzan: König des Dschungels) - was played individually over four minutes duration and witnessed the visiting team of Schorndorf presenting their Joker for play. It featured two male competitors from each team and a course comprising 12 rope swings hanging from trees. On the whistle, the first competitor had to jump down from a cave using the first rope swing and then grab hold of the second on his outward journey. He then had to move to the second rope swing and repeated the game until he had reached the twelfth and final rope swing. He then had to kick a small tree trunk into the water to signify for the second competitor to repeat the game. The team completing both journeys in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Schorndorf with their first competitor completing the course in a fast time of 50 seconds. The second competitor was even faster, completing the course in just 43 seconds and giving the team an aggregate time of 1 minute 33 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and it was apparent from the outset that they would not emulate the total time set by their rivals. The first of the two competitors, although making a brave effort to emulate his rivals, completed his run in 1 minute 12 seconds. With just 21 seconds to complete the second run, it was already a lost cause but the team played the game out with the second competitor completing his run in 1 minute 24 seconds, to give the team an aggregate time of 2 minutes 36 seconds.

Having played the Joker, the first 4pts were awarded to Schorndorf and they were leading Schwabach by 4-0.


Game 2 - Flowers of Paradise

The second game - ‘Flowers of Paradise’ (Blumen des Paradieses) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured two competitors (one male and one female) from each team and 35 brightly coloured flower heads hanging from a wire above the pool. On the whistle, the two competitors had to swim the length of the 50m (164ft) pool and collect two items to assist them to collect the flowers - a machete for the male and a floating log island for the female. Once they had collected their respective items, the competitors moved back up the pool with the male competitor cutting off the heads of the flowers from the wire whilst his team-mate placed the heads onto the island. The team collecting all the flower heads and returning to the start in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, this straightforward game was very close but ended with Schorndorf completing the game in 2 minutes 21 seconds whilst the home team of Schwabach completed the game in 2 minutes 22 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Schorndorf and they were now leading Schwabach by 6-0.


Game 3 - Catching Butterflies

The third game - ‘Catching Butterflies’ (Fangen Schmetterlinge) - was played individually over two minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team armed with a butterfly net. In the pool there was a long wooden podium and, floating on lily pads to the right-hand side, a total of 16 butterflies on lily pads. On the whistle, the competitor had to catch a butterfly and, once removed from the net, had to clip it onto his waist belt. He then moved along the log and repeated the game. Butterflies had to be caught one at a time and were not permitted to be retrieved from the pool by hand. The team completing the game in the faster time or the one catching the greater number of the insects in limit time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Schorndorf and it appeared that their competitor was not adept at clipping the butterflies on to his belt, something that delayed his journey along the course, and at the end of the game he had only collected 9 butterflies. The second heat saw the participation of the home team with their competitor appearing more adept in his balancing and clipping skills. After 1 minute 30 seconds of elapsed time, he had already equalled his rival’s score and this was something that would prove crucial at the end of the game. Following this, he struggled to clip the next insect to his belt, taking nearly 20 seconds to complete the task. At the end of the game, he had collected a total of 10 butterflies.

The 2pts were awarded to Schwabach and they were now trailing Schorndorf by 6-2.


Game 4 - The Father Ape

The fourth game - ‘The Father Ape’ (Der Affen Vater) - was played individually over 2 minutes 15 seconds duration and featured a male competitor from each team dressed in an ape costume. In the pool there were a series of 12 polystyrene logs and at the end of the course there was a stranded baby ape. On the whistle, the competitor had to make his way across the logs in an ape-like manner (on all four limbs) in order to reach the baby ape. Once it had been rescued, the competitor then had to make his way back across the logs in the same manner to cross the finish line. The baby ape had nothing attached to it that could be used to bond it to the competitor so the method of carrying it across the pool had to be carefully thought out. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Schwabach with their competitor reaching the baby ape after 28 seconds of elapsed time. Although at first glance his choice to carry the baby in his mouth appeared to be an arduous method which slowed him down, it would prove to be the more successful of the two chosen and he completed the course without mishap in 1 minute 28 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and it appeared that their competitor had the better stance and was faster over the outward journey. However, his pace began to slow, and he reached the baby ape after 31 seconds of elapsed time. The choice of method adopted to carry the baby ape was in complete contrast to the home team, with it being carried underneath the competitor’s dossard. However, this would prove to be Schorndorf’s downfall due to the fact that whilst the competitor was standing upright with his back straight, the baby sat firmly in place, but as soon as he leant forward the weight of the baby fell forward and dangled in the path of his feet as well as in the pool. This had the result of the baby becoming wet and heavier and more of a burden to carry. After 1 minute 35 seconds of elapsed time and with the game already beyond redemption, the competitor lost his footing and tumbled into the water. With his costume thoroughly soaked, he struggled to clamber back and stand up on the logs and eventually was declared out of time.

The 2pts were awarded to Schwabach and they were now trailing Schorndorf by 6-4.


Game 5 - The Safari Baggage

The fifth game - ‘The Safari Baggage’ (Die Safari Gepäck) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured two male competitors from each team, a large raft and a variety of travel baggage comprising 10 suitcases of varying size and 8 large polystyrene packing cases. On the whistle, the competitors jumped into the water and each carried five suitcases above their head whilst wading 20m (65ft 7½in) into the pool to reach the raft. Once the cases had been placed onto the raft, the competitors swam back to the start and each collected one of the large packing cases. This was repeated until all eight cases had been loaded onto the raft and then the competitors then had to push the raft to the start line. The team completing the course with all items intact would be declared the winners.

From the outset, both teams were neck and neck, but it was not until both teams had all their items on board that it became even closer. After 2 minutes 9 seconds of elapsed time, both teams began their return journey at exactly the same time and it was just a case of which team would be able to hold their nerve. But it was Schorndorf that appeared to have the edge and touched the finish line in 2 minutes 21 seconds with Schwabach finishing in 2 minutes 22 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Schorndorf and they were now leading Schwabach by 8-4.

Points to Note: (a) Eagle-eyed viewers would note that the suitcases in this game had been utilised in the final game of the previous heat staged at Offenburg.

(b) This was the second game in this heat that had finished with just 1 second separating the teams. Game 2 had also been won by the visiting team of Schorndorf and both teams had finished in the exact same times - 2 minutes 21 seconds and 2 minutes 22 seconds.


Game 6 - The Friendly Turtles

The sixth game - ‘The Friendly Turtles’ (Die Freundlichen Schildkröten) - was a straightforward game played in unison and featured two competitors (one male and one female) from each team and a large polystyrene turtle. At the start of the game, the female competitor was standing on a floating tree disc whilst her team-mate was on the pool’s edge. On the whistle, the male competitor had to enter the pool and climb inside the turtle costume and then swim the length of the 50m (164ft) course whilst pushing the island with the turtle’s nose. The team reaching the finishing line at the other end of the pool in the faster time would be declared the winners.

As was the case in the previous game, the game was neck and neck from the outset, but Schwabach started to edge ahead around the 25m (82ft) mark after their rivals went slightly off course. This gave the home team the momentum to push ahead and they reached the finish line in 1 minute 10 seconds with Schorndorf arriving in 1 minute 14 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Schwabach and they were now trailing Schorndorf by 8-6.


Game 7 - The Woodland Animal

The seventh game - ‘The Woodland Animal’ (Die Waldtier) - was played individually over three minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team dressed in a white woodland animal costume and three trees, each with 10 leaves hidden amongst their boughs. On the whistle, the competitor had to cross a rope using his arms and legs in order to reach the first tree. He then had to simply climb up, down and around the tree to find the 10 leaves and drop them into the pool below. Once accomplished, he then had to cross another rope to reach the second tree and then repeat the game before moving on to the third tree The team removing all 30 leaves in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Schwabach and, although this was a straightforward game, their competitor made it appear more difficult than it was. After reaching the third tree and removing all the leaves, the referees informed him that he had forgotten to dispense with one of the leaves from the second tree and he would have to return to the tree and remove it. This ultimately cost the team vital seconds but he completed the game in 2 minutes 37 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and their competitor was more adept in his climbing and searching skills and he completed the game in 1 minute 59 seconds. However, due to the referees having to confirm with each other that all the leaves had been removed, the official time was declared as 2 minutes 1 second.

The 2pts were awarded to Schorndorf and they were now leading Schwabach by 10-6.


Game 8 - The Tree Tower

The eighth game - ‘The Tree Tower’ (Der Turmbaum) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured four male competitors from each team and nine tree discs of varying size.

 
Schwabach and Schorndorf in action during ‘The Tree Tower’ game
 

On the whistle, two of the competitors had to dive into the pool from the largest of the discs and swim to the pool’s edge. They then had to collect discs in decreasing size and each bring one back to the middle of the pool and hand them to the other two competitors who had to begin building a tapering tower by placing them on top of the largest disc and then climb on top. The game was then repeated until eight discs were on top of each other. Once the final disc was delivered to the two climbing competitors, they had to stand aloft with the disc above their head to finish the game. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

As was the case with many of the games played in unison in this heat, this was a very close run contest with both teams neck and neck throughout. However, it was the home team that edged ahead after about 40 seconds of elapsed time, maintaining this slight advantage for the remainder of the game. Schwabach finished the game in 1 minute 32 seconds and Schorndorf were not far behind in 1 minute 42 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Schwabach and they were now trailing Schorndorf by 10-8.


Game 9 - The Safari Expedition

The ninth game - ‘The Safari Expedition’ (Die Safari-Expedition) - was another straightforward game and was played in unison over two minutes duration. It featured two competitors (one male and one female) from each team attired in jungle clothing and sitting astride a floating tree trunk. On the whistle, the two competitors had to move the tree trunk down the 50m (164ft) course by using their pith helmets as paddles. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Despite the fact that the Schorndorf duo got off to the better start, the team suffered a mishap after 30 seconds of elapsed time when their female competitor tumbled into the pool after trying to adjust her posture. This permitted the home team to take the lead and complete the game in 1 minute 2 seconds. In the meantime, the Schorndorf team had recomposed itself but failed to finish the game after both competitors tumbled into the water before reaching the finish line.

The 2pts were awarded to Schwabach and the scores were now level at 10-10.


Game 10 - The Giant Water Snake

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘The Giant Water Snake’ (Die Riesen Wasserschlange) - was played individually over two minutes duration and witnessed the home team of Schwabach presenting their Joker for play. It featured six competitors (four males and two females) from each team and a giant water snake comprising nine body sections. On the whistle, the four male competitors had to dive into the water and make their way across to the snake, which was curled up in the water, and each climb inside one of the first front four sections of the snake’s body. Working together, they had to uncoil the body in order for it to stretch out across the pool and, once accomplished, had to secure the head section to the pool’s edge. The referees then signalled to the first of the female competitors to begin her way across the snake’s body from one side of the pool to the other. This was then repeated by the second of the female competitors. The team completing the course with both females across in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat of this straightforward game saw the participation of Schorndorf and after securing the snake’s head after 59 seconds of elapsed time, they completed the game without mishap in 1 minute 40 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and it was soon apparent that the team had played their Joker wisely. After uncoiling the snake and securing it after 54 seconds of elapsed time, the team already had a 5-second advantage on their rivals. The female competitors did not disappoint and were more adept with their balancing skills and completed both runs in just 24 seconds (as opposed to 41 seconds taken by the Schorndorf duo). When the total time taken by Schwabach was declared as 1 minute 18 seconds, the arena erupted.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Schwabach and, with just one game remaining to play and now leading Schorndorf by 14-10, they had secured overall victory in the contest.


Game 11 - The Coconuts

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Coconuts’ (Die Kokosnüsse) - was simple and straightforward and was played in unison by two members of the public (one male and one female) representing their respective team. Located on the side of the pool was a plastic laundry basket containing 29 coconuts and, in the pool, about 5m (16ft 5in) from its edge, was a large basket on a floating podium. On the whistle, the representatives had to throw the coconuts, one at a time, into the basket to score. The female participated first and threw the first 14 coconuts and was followed by her male compatriot throwing the remaining 15 coconuts. The team scoring the greater number would be declared the winners.

Following 1 minute 41 seconds of play, both teams had exhausted their coconuts and the referees manually counted each basket separately. Schorndorf had scored 13 coconuts and Schwabach had scored 9 coconuts.

The final 2pts were awarded to the visiting team and the final scoreboard showed that Schwabach had beaten Schorndorf by 14-12.

Additional Information

Games designer Willi Steinberg created a watery jungle in the swimming pool complete with ivy-covered trees, floating logs and arboreal, amphibious and reptilian creatures.

Following the victory of the Schwabach team, some of the competitors who appeared for them in this heat did not participate further. The reason for this was that the trainers wanted to bring in stronger competitors to contest the International programme and this resulted in nine of the team members listed above not travelling to Switzerland. Meanwhile, team trainers, Rainer Leuthold and Werner Schrödel decided that they wanted to be part of the action in Switzerland and demoted themselves to competitors when the team participated at Solothurn six weeks later!

Made in Colour • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 4

Event Staged: Saturday 15th May 1971
Venue: Prümer Wall, Rheinbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 15th May 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Helmut Konrad, Werner Treichel and Gerd Zieper

Weather Conditions:
Warm and Sunny

Theme: Die Baustelle (The Construction Site)

Teams: Rheinbach v. Warburg

Team Members included:
Warburg -
Wolfgang Herrmann (Team Captain).

Games: The Sand Throwers, The Bricklayer, The Carpenters, The Crane Operator, The Roofers, The Overhead power Lines, The Excavator Bucket, The Water Carriers, The Robotic Brick Carrier, The Jumping Jacks, The Decorators.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
R 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 0 2 0
W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
R 2 4 6 8 10 12 16 18 18 20 20
W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 R • Rheinbach
 W Warburg

20
4

Rheinbach qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Rotterdam, Netherlands:
staged on Wednesday 7th July 1971

The Host Town

Rheinbach, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Rheinbach is a town with a population of around 28,000 inhabitants in the state of Nordrhein-Westfalen. It is located 16km (10 miles) south of the former capital city (West Germany) of Bonn, 261km (162 miles) north-west of Stuttgart, 494km (307 miles) south-west of Berlin and 57km (35½ miles) east of the Belgian border. It is a town full of history and stories and is famous for its manufacture of decorative church candles and ceramics industries and for its glassware, due to the fact that after World War II (1939-1945) many Eastern European glass workers fled here.

 

A typical street in Rheinbach with its colourful shop facades

 

The town was mentioned by name for the first time in AD 762, in a deed of King Pepin to the abbey Prüm. The knights and gentlemen of Rheinbach built a small rural settlement at the foot of its castle in the second half of the 13th century. Finds from the Stone Age and Roman times, however, show that Rheinbach had been settled thousands of years earlier. Town archives show that the town remained relatively small for many centuries with the population standing at just 135 inhabitants in 1581. However, the town began to grow and by 1664, it had a count of 167 families with 442 taxpayers.

In 1673, the Prince of Orange with four regiments took the city by force after Mayor Averdunck refused to surrender voluntarily. The Prince and his troops plundered the city and set fire to it, resulting in the destruction of 130 of the 150 houses and the deaths of 25 Rheinbach citizens and 23 farmers from the surrounding villages. By 1743, the population of Rheinbach had risen to 900 inhabitants, about 170 of whom had the rights of citizenship.

Between 1794 and 1815, the town found itself under French occupation with Rheinbach named as the capital of the newly formed canton. From 1816, the Rheinland became a Prussian province and the medieval city fortifications began to be demolished. By 1900, all traces of the old walls had disappeared.

In 1857, Die Spar und Darlehnskasse Rheinbach (The Rheinbach Loan and Savings Bank), known today as Kreissparkasse (District Savings Bank) is established. Its first bookkeeper was pensioner Theodor Liertz, who held the deposits and bonds in his apartment!

In 1969, Rheinbach and the municipalities of Flerzheim, Hilberath, Neukirchen, Lower Drees, Oberdrees, Queckenberg, Ramershoven, Todenfeld and Wormersdorf are amalgamated under municipal reorganization, to create the new town of Rheinbach.

The Venue

Prümer Wall

The games were themed around the everyday activities on a construction site and played on an area within the Prümer Wall (taking its name from the former abbey of Prüm) which marked the line of the former town wall. The German street name wall indicates the former ramparts, some of which are clearly visible on the southern side of the old town.

 
The Wasemerturm, dating back to the 13th century,
marks the limits of the old medieval town walls
 

At the western end is the Wasemerturm (Wasemer Tower) marking the south-western corner of the old town and is one of only two of the former eight towers of the medieval fortification they still exist today. The Neutor (New Gate) next to it was only built in the 17th century. A much lower new wall has been built along here in recent years to give an idea of the historical situation, which is long lost. Most of this work has been done by a local organization that gives work to unemployed young people. Behind the wall you'll see the back gardens of the little houses along the next street. As is the case with many local councils today to increase council funds, the area is utilised as a pay and display car park. However on occasion, it is also used for special events such as classic car exhibitions and music events.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Sand Throwers

The first game - ‘The Sand Throwers’ (Die Sandwerfer) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured four male competitors from each team, a portable cement-mixing machine and a huge pile of sand located between two 2m high walls. On the whistle, three of the competitors each equipped with a shovel had to throw sand over the wall and into the cement-mixer. To assist their direction of aim, the fourth competitor standing adjacent to the mixer shouted directions to them and adjusted the mouth of the mixer accordingly. Any sand that caught in the mixer could be emptied into large containers at any time by two male team-mates. The team catching the greater weight of sand would be declared the winners.

From the outset, this straightforward game appeared to be neck and neck with both teams shovelling great amounts of sand throughout. However, when it came to the final reckoning, the results revealed a completely different story. The four containers filled by Warburg were weighed first and they totalled 287.7kg (68.3kg + 86.4kg + 75.2kg + 57.8kg) or 634lb 4oz (45st 4lb 4oz). However, when it came to the Rheinbach team, their total almost doubled this figure with their nine containers weighing 544kg (71.3kg + 88.2kg + 80.4kg + 62.5kg + 68.1kg + 97.3kg + 76.2kg) or 1199lb 5oz (85st 9lb 5oz)!

The first 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were leading Warburg 2-0.

Point to Note: The scoring of this game took 3 minutes 55 seconds to complete as each of the containers were individually weighed and then all the totals tallied. This delay would result in assisting the programme to overrun and the archive material being lost.


Game 2 - The Bricklayer

The second game - ‘The Bricklayer’ (Der Steinschicht) - was played individually over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured a male competitor from each team underneath the ends of two inclined conveyor belts which were facing each other. The competitor was standing inside an already-prepared small chimney stack of three rows of 10 bricks. On the whistle, the two conveyer belts were started and two team-mates had to start placing polystyrene bricks onto marked areas at the base of the runners and as the bricks toppled over the end of the belts they had to be caught by the competitor underneath and placed onto the top row of the stack. However, the two belts were set at different heights and were running at different speeds and therefore the bricks would arrive intermittently (or together). The competitor had to be fast as he could only catch one brick at a time and if he failed to knock the other bricks out of the way, they would fall onto the stack and cause it to tumble to the ground. Only completed rows would be counted and the team achieving the stack with the greater height would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Rheinbach and the team completed the game without mishap and successfully stacked 8 rows which included the original three. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and their competitor was much taller than his rival, standing at 1.95m (6ft 5in) tall. Although this gave him somewhat of an advantage, he was assisted in part by a team-mate who could clearly be heard to shout “rechts” (to the right) as the bricks on the lower conveyor belt reached the top. Despite these advantages, the competitor failed to build each row with 10 bricks and although he stacked 9 rows of bricks, only six were deemed to be with the correct number.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 4-0.


Game 3 - The Carpenters

The third game - ‘The Carpenters’ (Die Zimmermänner) - was played in unison over four minutes duration and although it was straightforward and simple, it did have a close and exciting finish with a somewhat controversial decision. It featured a male competitor from each team and an obstacle course comprising four stepped hurdles, a wooden ladder and five 2.5m (8ft 2in) long rectangular wooden beams. On the whistle, the competitor had to transport one of the beams over the obstacles to the end of the 50m (164ft) course and then run back to the start and repeat the game. On completion of his fourth run, he had to start building a Stonehenge-like structure by standing two beams upright on their ends and then placing one of the other beams horizontally across the top. In order to reach the height, he had to utilise the remaining beam to stand on. After transporting the fifth beam, he had to use it a third upright and place the one used to stand on previously, across the top of this and the second upright. In essence, the finished structure would resemble a Stonehenge-like ‘∏∏' structure. However, the competitor had to ensure that the first two upright beams were not placed too close together resulting in the horizontal beam overhanging the edge. This error could ultimately cause him difficulty when balancing the second horizontal beam between the second and the third upright. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, this was a neck and neck contest with both teams on each other’s heels throughout. After completing their fourth runs, both competitors had constructed their first arch in exactly the same time of 2 minutes 52 seconds. With just over one minute remaining, both competitors raced back to the start to collect their final beam. The home competitor, now with a slight edge, began his final run but had a mishap and dropped the beam halfway up the course. This permitted the Warburg team to close the deficit and take the lead. However, the Warburg competitor appeared to have difficulty in placing the beam in position and this delay permitted Rheinbach to get back in contention. With the clock displayed 3 minutes 45 seconds of elapsed time, it was now a case of which competitor could hold his nerve. With just 15 seconds remaining, the Warburg competitor struggled with the beam as he had failed to allow enough of a gap between the first two uprights and the Rheinbach competitor could be observed dropping the final beam in the background. Although both competitors recomposed themselves and raised their beams to the top of the uprights, both structures were precariously unstable and began to topple to the side. With the clock reaching four minutes, both of the structures fell to the ground and it appeared that the game would be declared a draw. However, the referees declared that Rheinbach had completed the game in the nick of time, and it was the action of the Warburg structure falling against it that had caused it to tumble.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 6-0.

Point to Note: The visiting team were controversially robbed of 1pt in this game when the referees failed to take heed of the clock and the fact that the home team had not in fact finished the game correctly. Viewing re-runs of the game, they clearly showed that neither team had secured their structure at the point the clock hit four minutes and that both were actually leaning over to one side and were in the process of tumbling to the ground!


Game 4 - The Crane Operator

The fourth game - ‘The Crane Operator’ (Der Kranführer) - was played individually over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured a male competitor from each team and a large tower crane with a metal cage with open sides hanging from its jib. On the whistle, a team-mate had to load eight stone blocks, each weighing 4.54kg (10lb), into the cage and then he had to push it forward and release it. On the backward swing, the competitor had to adjust the height of the cage with a control unit so that on its forward swing the base would hit a wall. On doing so, the kinetic energy would cause the cage to topple forward and force the bricks out and down a slope to a holding pen. The game was then repeated until time limit. Any broken brick or any remaining on the slope would not be counted in the final tally. The team with the greater number of whole bricks in the pen would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Warburg and the team completed five swings within the time and dumped a total of 19 bricks (6 + 1 + 6 + 5 + 1) into the pen. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and they were much faster and were able to make six swings and dumped a total of 28 bricks (3 + 5 + 1 + 4 + 8 + 7) into the pen.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 8-0.

Point to Note: At the end of the second heat, assistant referee Werner Treichel stepped into the pen to make the manual count of bricks with the crowd assisting him audibly. However, after he had removed the 18th brick, he rubbed his hands to signify the end of the count. Due to the pen’s design and the position of cameras and grandstand, no-one in the crowd or at home could actually see inside the pen. The home crowd, believing that their team had actually scored significantly more than Warburg, fell silent after a great sigh. However, this was somewhat of a prank on Treichel’s part as he then stooped down and resumed the count, much to the amusement, and relief, of the crowd.


Game 5 - The Roofers

The fifth game - ‘The Roofers’ (Die Dachdecker) - was played in unison and witnessed the visiting team of Warburg presenting their Joker for play. It featured two male competitors from each team standing adjacent to a roof truss with eight purlins (small strips of wood that provide support for the rafters and from which the top edge of the tiles hang from) running across its width and a total of 48 roofing tiles. On the whistle, the two competitors had to run forward and each collect a roof tile and then run back and place it on the lowest of the purlins. This was repeated until a total of six tiles had been put in place and then they could commence on the second row and this continued until they had placed all 48 tiles on the roof making 8 rows of six tiles. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The competitors were neck and neck for the first 50 seconds of play when the halfway mark (four rows) had been reached, but then cracks started to appear in the performance of the Warburg duo. The competitors began to place the tiles erratically and not with as much precision as earlier and gaps began to appear between them. This would ultimately have a significant effect on the later stages, in the fact that the lower rows would need to be used to tread on to reach the higher purlins. As the teams reached their seventh rows together, Warburg had the narrowest of leads, but the earlier lack of precision by the visiting team finally came home to roost, when their tiles began to come loose and fall to the ground. With the game so closely contested up to this point, the team had no time to rectify the situation and ultimately handed the game to their rivals. Rheinbach finished the game and a perfect roof in 1 minute 55 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 10-0.

Points to Note: (a) Eagle-eyed viewers would notice that at the point when the right-hand Warburg competitor collects his fourth tile, his right foot became entangled in the wooden podium holding the tiles. Not to lose time, he disposed of the shoe and continued to play the game with his foot in a sock. At the end of the game, referee Helmut Konrad is seen holding the shoe and explaining that the team would have been disqualified in any case as they had failed to complete the game within the rules.

(b) Immediately following the above incident, one of the cameras panned to nine female audience members standing in the arena, each holding a large coloured letter. The letters spelled out the words ‘BAUT BESSER’ (build better), the exact significance of which is unknown.


Game 6 - The Overhead Power Lines

The sixth game - ‘The Overhead Power Lines’ (Die Freileitungen) - was played individually over four minutes duration and featured two male competitors from each team and six 10m (32ft 9¾in) high wooden upright poles set 7.5m (24ft 8ins) apart. At the top of the poles there were two power hooks, one above the other. Each competitor was equipped with a support wire around his waist and was wearing a helmet with a hook attached to the top and a pair of unusual shoes which had curved blades with hooks protruding from the outside edges. On the whistle, the duo had to work together to raise two power lines (ropes) to the tops of the poles. In order to do so, each had to place the power line in the hook of the helmet and then clip the support wire around the pole and then secure the wire back around his waist. The unusual shoes were designed so that the hooks on the blades would stick into the back of the pole, in the same manner as crampons, and permit the competitors to simply walk up the pole. Once they had reached the top, they hung the rope over the higher of the two hooks and then climbed back down the poles. The team then moved along to the third and fourth poles, respectively, and repeated the process and then once again with the fifth and sixth poles. Once the power line had been secured in place at the top of the sixth pole and both competitors had descended, they had run back to the start and repeat the game using a second rope and the lower of the two hooks. It should be noted that each pole had been marked halfway along its length with a white line to denote the point at which competitors could drop to the ground rather than descending the pole step by step. The time taken would be recorded when both competitors were on the ground after their final descents. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Warburg and the team completed their first run in 1 minute 26 seconds and their second run in 2 minutes 3 seconds. Their total time was declared as 3 minutes 29 seconds which appeared to be a respectable time based on the design and technicality of the game. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and they displayed a performance which was even better. Despite the fact that the team completed their first run three seconds behind their rival’s time in 1 minute 29 seconds, they closed the deficit on their second run, which they completed in 1 minute 41 seconds. The total time taken was declared as 3 minutes 10 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and, with only five games remaining to play and now leading Warburg 12-0, they had already secured overall victory.

Point to Note: Although many of the games at this heat were well designed and thought out, this would clearly stand out as the most ingenious from the mind of designer Willi Steinberg. After overcoming the design of the attire, the game was past-paced and the dexterity of all four competitors was something to admire. A true Spiel Ohne Grenzen classic.


Game 7 - The Excavator Bucket

The seventh game - ‘The Excavator Bucket’ (Der Löffelbagger) - was played individually over three minutes duration and witnessed the home team of Rheinbach presenting their Joker for play. It featured a male competitor from each team operating a hydraulic excavator bucket. On the whistle, an empty bottle was placed on a wooden table by a team-mate and the competitor had to pick it up by the neck using the jaws of the bucket. However, he had to ensure that he did not close the jaws too fast or to sustain too much pressure on the bottle as either scenario could result in the bottle breaking. Once in the jaws of the bucket, the bottle had to be transported 90° to another table on top of which was a wooden box with 20 compartments into which the competitor had to drop the bottle. He had to ensure that it was exactly above one of the compartments before releasing it otherwise the bottle would topple over and fail to go in. Once accomplished, the game was repeated until time expired. The team collecting the greater number of bottles would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Rheinbach and their competitor had successfully secured the first bottle in the jaws of the bucket within 20 seconds and had placed it in the box after 54 seconds of elapsed time. On his second attempt to pick up a bottle, he put too much pressure on it and crushed the top. A replacement bottle was positioned on the table, which he secured in the jaws after 1 minute 32 seconds and into the box after 1 minute 56 seconds. A third bottle was secured in the excavator’s jaws after 2 minutes 25 seconds but it failed to be put into the box successfully and it toppled over following its release. Although a fourth bottle was placed on the table, elapsed time was against the team and the whistle was sounded just before the competitor could pick it up and Rheinbach were declared as having scored a total of 2 bottles. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and was a completely different story to that of the first. The Warburg competitor struggled to position and control of swing of the bucket on his first attempt and it resulted in the bottle’s neck being crushed after too much pressure was put on it. With elapsed time already at 48 seconds, a replacement bottle was positioned on the table and a second attempt made to pick it up, which he did successfully after 11 seconds later. Unfortunately for the team, he was not so adept with the excavator’s controls and, whilst waiting for the bucket to stop swinging as it hovered over the table, he put a little too much pressure on the bottle which resulted in it breaking and falling onto the box below. He quickly returned to pick up another bottle but, with the clock already displaying 1 minute 40 seconds and with his inept skills, it appeared to be a lost cause. Despite this, he persevered and picked up another bottle after 2 minutes 13 seconds of elapsed time, but this was to be his swansong, because what followed was to leave everybody in fits of laughter. As he attempted to drop the bottle into the box, he pushed down with the bucket and the bottle broke. Somewhat aware that the game was now lost, he then pushed down harder and completely crushed the wooden table. A camera shot clearly shows him doing this with a wry smile on his face. Whilst presenter Camillo Felgen, also seeing the funny side to his antic, was explaining to the television audience at home what had taken place, in the background the other table could be heard being crushed by the excavator. With elapsed time now standing at 2 minutes 50 seconds, the game was stopped and the referees rushed in with huge smiles on their faces. Warburg had failed to collect any bottles and were declared out of time.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 16-0.


Game 8 - The Water Carriers

The eighth game - ‘The Water Carriers’ (Die Wasserträger) - was played in unison over 3 minutes 30 seconds duration. It was straightforward and featured two male competitors from each team armed with a rope which had five buckets attached to it. On the whistle, the competitors had to transport the rope over their shoulders to the end of the 50m (164ft) course whilst negotiating the four stepped hurdles used earlier in the third game. Once they had reached the end, any contents remaining in the buckets had to be emptied into a Perspex measuring container. The competitors then ran back to the start, avoiding the obstacles, and repeated the game until time expired. The team collecting the greater amount of water would be declared the winners.

Both teams, neck and neck throughout, each traversed the course on four occasions and at the end of the game, the result reflected this. Whilst Rheinbach had collected a total of 44.8cm (17½in) of water, the Warburg team had collected 44.1cm (17¼in) of water.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 18-0.


Game 9 - The Robotic Brick Carrier

The ninth game - ‘The Robotic Brick Carrier’ (Die Roboter-Backsteinträger) - was played individually over four minutes duration and featured two male competitors, one blindfolded and dressed in a robot costume and the second giving directions using a walkie-talkie. On the whistle, the costumed competitor had to be guided to a podium where his ‘talking’ team-mate was located and then given further instructions in order to pick up a stack of bricks. Keeping hold of the stack, he was then guided through a small obstacle maze comprising five wooden beams to the other end of the course where a team-mate was located. It was then the team-mate’s responsibility to signal, using hand movements only, to the talking competitor to instruct the robot on the position of the podium so that the stack could be placed without loss of any bricks. Once accomplished, the robot released the bricks and turned around and the game was repeated throughout. There was no limit to the number of bricks that could be carried at any time, but it appeared that 15 or 16 was the norm, and the team-mate at the end of the course was not permitted to assist the robot when placing them on the second podium. The team collecting the greater number of bricks would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Warburg who got off to a reasonable start and successfully placed 15 bricks on the second podium after exactly one minute of elapsed time. However following this, the robot went somewhat off-course and lost valuable time, but nevertheless the robot recomposed itself and returned to the first podium after 1 minute 59 seconds. Another successful journey through the maze saw the second set 15 bricks placed onto the podium after 2 minutes 50 seconds. Although the robot returned to the start for a third journey, elapsed time was not on his side and he had just 24 seconds remaining to complete the run. Despite his efforts, the robot could only traverse half the course before the final whistle was sounded. The score for Warburg was confirmed as 30 bricks. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and their robot picked up 16 bricks on his first run. However, a small disaster was to befall the team when 3 of the bricks tumbled to the ground after the robot collided with the second of the five beams. Further disaster was to follow after the robot reached the end of the course after 1 minute 15 seconds of elapsed time and made a complete hash of placing the bricks on the podium. Despite his team-mate’s attempts, the referees stepped in and prevented him from assisting the robot. Eventually after 1 minute 40 seconds of elapsed time, the team decided to abandon any further attempt to secure the stack and the robot was instructed to turn around. However time was no longer on their side and, with the team only having secured 8 bricks on the podium, the robot was guided back through the maze. The robot collected the second stack of 16 bricks after 2 minutes 31 seconds of elapsed time and commenced his journey. Almost immediately he lost one of the bricks and then another at the end of the course, but successfully placed the remaining 14 bricks on the podium after 3 minutes 31 seconds of elapsed time. As was the case with the Warburg team, time was not on their side, and although the Rheinbach robot began his second return journey, the final whistle was sounded before he had reached the halfway mark. Rheinbach was confirmed as having collected 22 bricks.

Warburg had finally been victorious and with the 2pts awarded, they were now trailing Rheinbach 18-2.

Point to Note: Due to the nature of the game, it was played in almost total silence, with commentary by presenter Camillo Felgen being limited to a few sentences in the whole eight minutes of play.


Game 10 - The Jumping Jacks

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘The Jumping Jacks’ - was played in unison over one minute duration and featured a male competitor from each team armed with a 1970s hydraulic ‘jumping jack’ surface rammer. The enclosed course had a sand base under which 20 electrical contacts were hidden. On the whistle, the competitors had to operate the jumping jacks and move around the course trying to find the contacts. If successful, a light would be illuminated at the back of the course for each contact found and the team with the greater number of lights illuminated would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game ended with Rheinbach illuminating 5 lights and Warburg illuminating just 1 light.

The 2pts were awarded to Rheinbach and they were now leading Warburg 20-2.


Game 11 - The Decorators

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Decorators’ (Die Dekorateuren) - was played in unison and featured a female member of the public representing her respective team and a trolley loaded with 24 paint tins.

Unfortunately, this programme overran its transmission slot and is retained in German archives in an incomplete form. No other details of this game are available, as the surviving recording fades to black just before the commencement of the game. However, based upon information gleaned from other media, it is known that the visiting team were successful and won the game.

The final 2pts were awarded to the visiting team and the final scoreboard showed that Rheinbach had beaten Warburg by 20-4. As no final scoreboard was seen in the recording, the one displayed above has been mocked up by JSFnetGB.

Looks Familiar?

The seventh game - ‘The Excavator Bucket’ - was a variant on a game that had previously been played at two other International Heats staged at Stavelot, Belgium in 1965 (The Hydraulic Digger and the Egg) and Edinburgh, Great Britain in 1969 (The Pelican Roulette). The only main difference was that at both of those venues, the excavator bucket was used to lift eggs from a podium, whereas here it was used to lift empty beer bottles.

Additional Information

The surviving archive recording of this heat overran its allotted slot and survives incomplete with the end credits missing. This was a result of some of the games having running times that were longer than normal and the referees continual habit of carrying out manual counts with audience participation rather than just announcing the result.

Made in Colour • This programme exists incomplete in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 5

Event Staged: Saturday 22nd May 1971
Venue: Emslandstadion (Emsland Stadium), Lingen an der Ems,
Nordrhein-Westfalen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 22nd May 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Peter Hochrath, Helmut Konrad and Gerd Zieper

Weather Conditions:
Sunny and Warm with a Strong Breeze

Theme: Die Römische Gladiatoren (The Roman Gladiators)

Teams: Bockum-Hövel v. Lingen an der Ems

Team Members included:
Bockum-Hövel - Dieter Ende.

Games: Ben-Hur, A Stone’s Throw, The Roman Columns, A Test of Strength, The Lion’s Den, The Flags, The Captured Gladiators, The Flying Gladiators, The Protective Shields, The Giant Maces, The Key to the Cage.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
BH 2 2 2 2 0 4 2 2 0 0 0
L 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 2 2
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
BH 2 4 6 8 8 12 14 16 16 16 16
L 0 0 0 0 4 4 4 4 6 8 10

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 BH • Bockum-Hövel
 L Lingen an der Ems

16
10

Bockum-Hövel qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Vichy, France:
staged on Wednesday 21st July 1971

The Host Town

Lingen an der Ems, Niedersachsen

Lingen an der Ems is a town with a population of around 56,000 inhabitants in the state of Niedersachsen. It is located on the Ems river, 116km (72 miles) south-west of Bremen, 123km (76½ miles) north of Essen, 411km (255¼ miles) west of Berlin and just 42km (26 miles) east of the Dutch border town of Coevorden. The town also spans the 269km (167miles) long Dortmund-Ems Kanal which runs between the northern sea port of Emden and the inland city port of Dortmund.

 

The Marktplatz in Lingen, with its small Town Hall (left),
is the setting for the triennial Kivelingsfest

 

The town was first mentioned as Liinga around AD 975. The Dukes of Tecklenburg built a citadel in the area occupied by the current downtown area. It developed into a settlement that was still called 'village' as late as 1227. The settlement received town charter status in the early 14th century. In 1372, the young bachelor sons of the bourgeoisie of Lingen courageously defended the citadel which was under siege by the Bishop of Münster. This heroic act is celebrated on Whit Sunday of every third year by the young citizens at the Kivelingsfest - the festival of the Kivelinge (small fighters). Staged on the market-place, this special medieval spectacle attracts thousands of people from near and far.

Following a great blaze in 1548, when the majority of the town was destroyed, it was gradually reconstructed. Emperor Charles V (1500-1558) captured the castle in 1551 and from that time on the power base in Lingen changed more often than in any other German town or city. Philip II of Spain (1527-1598) and William of Orange of the Netherlands (1533-1584) took turns in conquering the city. The reign of Orange however, proved to be a golden era for Lingen, contributing to a high standard of education and a characteristic style of architecture. The castle was destroyed in 1607 and the fortifications razed in 1632. The Westphalian Peace Treaty of 1648 declared Lingen to be temporarily a part of Overijssels and thus a part of the Netherlands.

The Netherlands increasingly developed the city and trade and economy flourished. Many of the present-day buildings with the characteristic of Lingen were constructed during this particular era. William III of Orange (1650-1702) built a Latin-School and also founded a university in 1697 which existed until 1820. The historical buildings surrounding the Universitätsplatz (University Square) are still regarded as highlights of Lingen. After William’s death, the town came under the rule of Prussia in 1702. It was only the French (1806-1813) and the Kingdom of Hanover (1815-1866) who were capable of challenging the Prussians and intermittently took possession. After 1866, again under Prussian rule, Lingen became the county town of Emsland, a status that did not change until regional reforms in 1977. During the Industrial Revolution, Lingen began to flourish. The railway repair factory was opened in 1856 and the opening of the Dortmund-Ems canal followed in 1899.

Today, the historical Town Hall dominates the marketplace and it documents the powerful self-pride of Lingen during the past centuries. It is considered quite small for a Town Hall with a floor-area of only 104m² (1,119ft²). The original Town Hall was probably destroyed during the big town blaze of 1548. Until the beginning of the 17th century, the courts held their sessions in closed halls in the building. In 1663, the session room was moved to the upper floor and an attractive staircase was added. In the vacant hall in the basement, a guard room, two cells and public weigh-bridge were installed. At the same time, the coat of arms of the town was inserted above the door in the gable and the anchor irons were located at the height of the main cornice. Substantial restoration and reconstructions were completed in 2001. Since that time, this landmark building has offered facilities for ceremonial occasions as well as for weddings. As is tradition, the Kivelinge present a gift to the town during its festival. In 1952, it came in the form of a glockenspiel which was placed in the tower of the Town Hall. In 2003, the Kivelinge presented the town with a set of moving figures to complement the glockenspiel and at 12pm, 3pm and 6pm each day, the tower doors open to reveal a drummer, a royal couple of the Kivelinge, a commander, a mayor, a flag-bearer, a Bürgertochter (daughter of the bourgeoisie) and the Kivelinge itself.

Today, apart from attracting tourists from all over Europe, Lingen an der Ems is known for its offshore and nuclear industry - Emsland Nuclear Power Plant - and also for its beautiful natural surroundings alongside the River Ems.

The Venue

Emslandstadion

The games were themed around Roman gladiators and played at the town’s Emslandstadion which is a multi-purpose stadium catering for both football and athletics. It has a capacity of 7,500 people, 900 of which are under cover. The local football club play in the Niedersachsenliga, the fifth tier of the German football league system and the highest league in the state of Niedersachsen. Formed on 10th April 1910, as the Lingener Sport Verein (LSV), the club have always played in an all-red kit with a yellow stripe across the shoulders and displaying a badge denoting the three Lingen towers.

 
The multi-purpose Emslandstadion is also home to
local football club TuS Lingen 1910
 

The first training session took place on the Kotten Weise (Kotten Meadow) in the nearby village of Schepsdorf. At that time, since the sport of football was still frowned upon by many older people, the club only had 13 founding young members. After 1913, the number of members had increased to 35, but then somewhat stagnated. It was then that the club began to offer athletics and this resulted in a dramatic increase in membership numbers. Both footballers and athletes showed very good performances in the 1920s. Whilst the athletes reigned supreme at regional sports festivals, the football club went on to the Gauliga, the highest level of play in German football between 1934 and 1945.

After the Second World War (1939-1945), the club was re-established under its current name TuS Lingen 1910 (Turn und Sportverein Lingen 1910) and found annual successes leading to promotion to the second highest league, the Amateuroberliga Niedersachsen West district in 1954. Following these successes, the club suffered many years of uncertainty following successive defeats and end-of-year results. Not to be too disheartened, the club recovered and enjoyed another period of success between 1971 and 1974 when the club won four championships in a row and were promoted to the Verbandsliga West.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - Ben-Hur

The first game - ‘Ben-Hur’ - was played in unison over eight runs and featured a male competitor from each team armed with a large spear with a flexible shaft and a Roman chariot pulled by two male opposition members dressed as horses. On the whistle, the two opposition horses had to race along a 50m (164ft) L-shaped course which was flanked on either side by 50 balloons attached to individual podiums whilst the competitor in the chariot attempted to burst as many of them as he was able with the spear’s tip. When the chariot reached the end of the course, the horses turned around and the game was repeated. This continued until 8 complete runs (or 4 return journeys) had been completed. The team bursting the greater aggregate number of balloons would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game saw both teams neck and neck as they completed their runs but the scores at the end revealed that whilst the home team had burst 74 balloons, the visitors had burst 82 balloons.

The first 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were leading Lingen an der Ems 2-0.

Point to Note: Eagle-eared viewers would notice that the word zwo was used instead of the more familiar zwei at the end of this game and during other programmes in this series. The explanation for this is that in early modern German, zwei had three genders - zween (m), zwo (f) and zwei (n). The masculine and feminine gender fell out of use in favour of the neuter, but during the 20th century, zwo came back into use and, whilst it did not point to the feminine gender anymore, was used to distinguish between zwei (two) and the similar-sounding drei (three) in spoken language e.g. on the telephone.


Game 2 - A Stone's Throw

The second game - ‘A Stone’s Throw’ (Ein Steinwurf) - was played individually over two heats and featured a male competitor from each team and a 15kg rubber boulder. On the whistle, the competitor had to lift the stone from the ground and then ‘cold’ throw it towards a boxed 25m (82ft) course marked out in metre sections. Once the boulder had come to rest in a section, the competitor was then permitted to throw the boulder from that point. This was then repeated until four throws had been completed and the total distance was marked with a flag. After both competitors had completed their first rounds, the game was repeated. Boulders that fell outside the remit of the boxed sections would not be counted and the throw would be deemed as non-scoring. The team achieving the greater aggregate distance would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Lingen an der Ems and the four throws saw the boulder reach the 3m, 6m, 11m and 16m sections, respectively. However, the score was only declared as 15m as the competitor had been penalised on his second throw after he had placed his foot on the wooden slat that separated each section instead of keeping his feet on the ground and was deemed to have given him some advantage of extra balance. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and their competitor reached the 2m, 7m, 12m and 16m sections, respectively, with his four throws. The third heat saw the home team on their second run with their competitor reaching the 2m, 8m, 13m and 17m sections. The fourth and final heat saw the Bockum-Hövel competitor reaching the 3m, 8m, 14m and 18m sections. The aggregate score for Lingen an der Ems was declared as 32m (15m + 17m) whilst the score for Bockum-Hövel was declared as 34m (16m + 18m).

The 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were now leading Lingen an der Ems 4-0.


Game 3 - The Roman Columns

The third game - ‘The Roman Columns’ (Die Römischen Säulen) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured two male competitors from each team standing adjacent to a Roman column comprised of ten individual parts. On the whistle, the competitors had to lift the column and carry it down a 50m (164ft) L-shaped course comprising five obstacles, ensuring that the column remained intact. Once the team had accomplished this, they turned around and repeated the course in the opposite direction. Teams were permitted to rebuild their column should it tumble to the ground. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, the visitors took command of the game and reached the turnaround point in 1 minute 2 seconds with the home team reaching the same point after 1 minute 11 seconds. The return journey was almost a repeat of the outward with the exception that the Lingen an der Ems team suffered a mishap on their approach to their final obstacle and the column tumbled to the ground. However, it made little difference to the result as the Bockum-Hövel competitors had already crossed the finish line and completed the game in 1 minute 58 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were now leading Lingen an der Ems 6-0.


Game 4 - A Test of Strength

The fourth game - ‘A Test of Strength’ (Ein Test der Stärke) - was played in unison over three heats of one minute duration and was a tug-o-war contest in reverse. It featured four male competitors from each team and a greased walkway flanked on both sides by a small wall. Spanning the wall and secured at its mid-point, was a large column which could be moved back and forth along the top. Before the game was started, the competitors approached the wall from either side and got themselves into position by pressing against the column. Once both teams were ready and the column was confirmed as being exactly mid-point, the whistle was sounded. The teams then had to use their strength to move the column to their specified point along the wall to win the heat. The team winning the greater number of heats would be declared the winners.

The first heat was a whitewash after the visitors completed the game in just 10 seconds. The second heat was a different story and although the visitors had the upper hand, stalemate set in after 11 seconds of elapsed time and no further progress was made in either direction. With the heat declared null and void, the game went into its final heat with Bockum-Hövel still leading 1-0. The third heat was an exact repeat of the second and ended in stalemate. Bockum-Hövel were declared the winners 1-0 by default rather than on their own merits.

The 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were now leading Lingen an der Ems 8-0.


Game 5 - The Lion's Den

The fifth game - ‘The Lion’s Den’ (Der Löwengrube) - was played individually over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and witnessed the home team of Lingen an der Ems presenting their Joker for play. It featured two male competitors from each team in a lion’s costume and four opposition males each attired in an inflexible polystyrene gladiator costume standing within a padded arena. On the whistle, the lion had to knock the gladiators to the floor by unbalancing them whilst the gladiators attempted to avoid any contact by moving around the arena. The team knocking all four gladiators to the floor in the faster time or the one having the greater number brought down within limit time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Lingen an der Ems and with the opposition suffering casualties after 7 seconds, 25 seconds and 35 seconds of elapsed time, it was apparent as to the reason for the home team’s choice of Joker game. Despite a brave effort from the final gladiator, the home team set an almost unbeatable target after knocking him down after 42 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting team and from the outset it was a different story to that of the first. Despite every attempt by the lion, it could not unbalance any of the home team’s gladiators and as the clocked passed the 42 seconds mark, the game was all over in essence. Whilst presenter Camillo Felgen explained that the Lingen an der Ems team were about to receive their first points of the competition, the Bockum-Hövel lion knocked its first gladiator to the ground after exactly one minute of elapsed time. A second gladiator was brought down after 1 minute 30 seconds with the third after 1 minute 53 seconds. Following this and despite all its efforts including one of the competitors using his had to pull the opposition to the ground, no further scoring occurred. The Bockum-Hövel team were declared as out of time and although the home crowd already aware of the outcome, it was met with great cheers as the result was announced.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Lingen an der Ems and they were now trailing Bockum-Hövel 8-4.


Game 6 - The Flags

The sixth game - ‘The Flags’ (Die Fahnen) - was played individually over two minutes duration and witnessed the visiting team of Bockum-Hövel presenting their Joker for play. It featured two male competitors from each team assisted by two male team-mates and 15 flags hanging above a pool. On the whistle, the two team-mates assisted the first of the competitors by raising him off the ground and then pushing him upwards and out to the centre of the pool to grab the flags. This was then repeated with the second competitor whilst the first exited the pool and returned to repeat the game. There was no limit as to the number of flags that could be removed on each attempt and there was no ruling as to the method of propulsion. The team removing all the flags in the faster time or the one removing the greater number would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Bockum-Hövel and the team adopted a method of cupping their hands to raise the competitors off the ground. This method would later be vindicated as giving the greater upward movement of the two adopted. On the first lift, the competitor removed 11 flags with another being removed after 43 seconds of elapsed time. Despite another four attempts being made, the remaining flags were out of reach of the competitors. The score for Bockum-Hövel was confirmed as 12 flags. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and they adopted a different style to their rivals and one which appeared to be their downfall. The competitors were raised up to the shoulder-height of the team-mates and them hurled forward, but this method had the disadvantage of not having such a great upward movement from the team-mates’ push. On their first attempt, the competitor removed 5 flags and a further 4 flags were removed by the second competitor on his first attempt. Two failed attempts were then followed by success, when the first competitor removed another flag after 56 seconds of elapsed time. Immediately after this, a further flag was removed by the second competitor on his next attempt and the scores stood at 12-11 in the visiting team’s favour with 53 seconds remaining on the clock. However, the reduced strength of the competitors and team-mates, coupled with the great distance needed to reach the remaining flags, would result in no further progress being made and the game ended 12-11 in Bockum-Hövel’s favour.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were now leading Lingen an der Ems 12-4.


Game 7 - The Captured Gladiators

The seventh game - ‘The Captured Gladiators’ (Die Gefangenen Gladiatoren) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured six male competitors from each team inside a elongated net and an obstacle course comprised of small hurdles, bridges and tunnels. On the whistle, the team had to work together and get into a uniform step in order to move along the course and step over the higher obstacles. When encountering the low obstacles, the team had to get down on their knees to pass underneath but continue moving in a uniform step. The team reaching the end of the 50m (164ft) L-shaped course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, it was apparent that the visitors were the stronger and more organised of the teams in this straightforward game. Leading throughout, they completed the game in 1 minute 45 seconds whilst Lingen an der Ems crossed the finishing line in 2 minutes 5 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and, with only four games remaining to play and now leading Lingen an der Ems 14-4, they had already secured overall victory.


Game 8 - The Flying Gladiators

The eighth game - ‘The Flying Gladiators’ (Die Fliegenden Gladiatoren) - was played individually over three runs and, as the name suggests, was played above the arena. It featured three male competitors from each team utilising a zip wire and six ‘lion’ targets of differing values. On the whistle, the first of the competitors placed a large rubber boulder between his feet and then descended into the arena by the wire. At a chosen point, he would aim and release the boulder in order to knock over one of the targets. The targets were set out in an arrowhead (Λ) formation with the lower outside targets valued at 5pts each, the middle two targets valued at 4pts each and the targets at the tip of the arrowhead valued at 3pts each. In order to reach the highest-scoring targets, the competitors would need to turn their bodies before releasing the boulder. The team achieving the greater total would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Bockum-Hövel and their three competitors scored 0pts, 4pts and 4pts, respectively and giving the team a total of 8pts. The second heat saw the participation of the home team who scored 0pts, 4pts and 0pts on their three runs, giving the team a total of 4pts.

The 2pts were awarded to Bockum-Hövel and they were now leading Lingen an der Ems 16-4.


Game 9 - The Protective Shields

The ninth game - ‘The Protective Shields’ (Die Schutzschilde) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team and two giant shields attached to each other to create a wheel. On the whistle, the competitor had to climb to the top of the shields and face away from the course. Two team-mates then rolled the shields down the 50m (164ft) L-shaped course whilst the competitor walked forward, maintaining his balance throughout. The team would be permitted to recompose itself, without penalty, should their competitor fall to the ground. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Although at this point, it was already a foregone conclusion, this straightforward game witnessed the comeback of the home team. Leading from the outset, the team completed the game without mishap in 1 minute 9 seconds with their rivals finishing in 1 minute 11 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Lingen an der Ems and they were now trailing Bockum-Hövel 16-6.

Point to Note: Before the start of this game, presenter Camillo Felgen addressed the cameras whilst looking at his watch and stated that elapsed time was approaching the one hour mark (roughly 56 minutes in truth) and that they had to ensure that the programme did not overrun as it had done at the previous week’s venue of Rheinbach. He continued by saying that this was one reason the games had been of shorter duration and had very basic scoring. He also went on to explain that this had prevented him from having his normal discussions with team members. Nevertheless, it did not appear to prevent him from having a long conversation with both competitors at the start of the game!


Game 10 - The Giant Maces

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘The Giant Maces’ (Die Riesigen Keulen) - was played in unison over a maximum fourteen rounds of 20 seconds and featured four male competitors from each team armed with giant rubber maces and a balance beam spanning a pool. Before the game started, the first of the competitors from each team made his way across the beam to a given point and on the whistle, had to take part in a ‘pillow-fight’ type contest by attempting to knock his opponent off the beam. The maximum time that each ‘fight’ could last was 20 seconds and all competitors that fell into the pool would be counted, winners or not. Once a team had reached 4pts, the teams changed ends and repeated the game until a team reached 4pts again. The team with the greater aggregate number of competitors in the pool would be declared the winners.

The first two rounds ended in draws when the victors of each round lost their balance after knocking their opponents into the pool (running total 2-2). The third round saw Bockum-Hövel victorious (3-2 in their favour) whilst another draw ensued in the fourth (4-3 to Bockum-Hövel). With the visitors reaching the required total, the teams changed ends for the start of the fifth round which saw the visitors victorious once more (1-0 to Bockum-Hövel). The sixth round saw another draw (2-1 to Bockum-Hövel) but after this the home team made a miraculous recovery by winning the next three ‘fights’ (4-2 to Lingen an der Ems). With the required total reached by the home team, the game ended and the final aggregate scores revealed that Lingen an der Ems had won the game by 7-6 (3-4 + 4-2).

The 2pts were awarded to Lingen an der Ems and they were now trailing Bockum-Hövel 16-8.


Game 11 - The Keys to the Cage

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Key to the Cage’ (Der Schlüssel für den Käfig) - was played in unison and featured a female member of the public representing her respective team and a double-gated cage, inside which were two lions. On the whistle, the competitor had to race to her respective gate where a bunch of 15 keys of similar shape and size were located. She then had to try and find the key that unlocked the gate by trying each one in the lock. The team opening the gate and releasing the lions in the faster time would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game saw the Lingen an der Ems representative opening her gate first in 26 seconds.

The final 2pts were awarded to the home team and the final scoreboard showed that Bockum-Hövel had beaten Lingen an der Ems by 16-10.

Additional Information

The surviving archive recording of this heat is incomplete, missing the opening titles and the "picture postcard" introductions of the towns competing. The programme opens just as the teams are arriving in the arena accompanied by strains of Entrance of the Gladiators composed in 1897 by Czech composer Julius Fučík (1872-1916).

At the time of recording the town of Bockum-Hövel stood to the north-west of the city of Hamm. However, in a reorganisation of 1975, the town lost its identity when it was incorporated into its near neighbour and forms the quarter of the city with the largest number of inhabitants (35,000 at the end of 2010).

Made in Colour • This programme exists incomplete in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 6

Event Staged: Saturday 29th May 1971
Venue: Ufer des Großen Plöner See (Shore of the Great Plön Lake), Plön am See,
Schleswig-Holstein, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 29th May 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)

Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Peter Hochrath and Werner Treischel

Weather Conditions:
Hot and Sunny

Theme: Die Amerikanischen Indianer (The American Red Indians)

Teams: Plön am See v. Wetter an der Ruhr

Games: The Canoes, The Peace Pipe, The Kon-Tiki Rafts, The Chieftains, The Paddle Horses, Crimping the Clothes, The Totem Poles, The Dance of Death, Catching the Fish, The Chicken’s Eggs, The Tomahawks.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
P 4 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 1
W 0 2 1 2 0 2 4 1 2 0 1
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
P 4 4 4 5 7 7 7 8 8 10 11
W 0 2 3 5 5 7 11 12 14 14 15

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 W • Wetter an der Ruhr
 P Plön am See

15
11

Wetter an der Ruhr qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Blackpool, Great Britain:
staged on Wednesday 18th August 1971

The Host Town

Plön am See, Schleswig-Holstein

Plön am See is a town with a population of around 9,000 inhabitants in the northernmost state of Schleswig-Holstein and is located 73km north-east of Hamburg, 269km north-west of Berlin, 676km north of München and 100km south-east of the border with Denmark. It lies on a narrow isthmus on the shore of the state’s largest lake - the Großer Plöner See - as well as on four smaller lakes - Behler See, Kleiner Plöner See, Schöhsee and Trammer See - which virtually touch the town on all sides. The town's landmark is Plön Castle, a chateau built in the 17th century on a hill overlooking the town.

The history of the town dates back to when Slavic tribes entered the region during the early 7th century following the withdrawal of the original Germanic population. On the large island opposite Plön, which was later called Olsborg, they built a large fortification. They called their settlement Plune, which literally means ‘ice-free water’. In 1139, Adolf II of Schauenburg (1128-1164), Count of Holstein, destroyed the fortress, ending the domination of the Slavs in the region. Twenty years later in 1159, Adolf II had the castle on the island rebuilt, but soon had it moved to its present site of Schloßberg (castle hill). It was here, under the protection of the castle and close to the major trading route from Lübeck to the north, that a Saxon market town emerged.

 

Aerial view of Plön am See (looking east)
which is surrounded by large freshwater lakes

 

In 1236, Plön was granted town rights under Lübeck law and it remained a centre of the County of Holstein until the Danish royal house fell in the 15th century. Between 1633 and 1636, a Renaissance castle was built on the site of the old one by Duke Joachim Ernest (1595-1671) and the town became the capital of a small, but independent, princedom. As a residence town, Plön experienced a considerable increase in status and later under Duke Charles Frederick (1706-1761), the castle district was expanded with several baroque buildings and a pleasure garden. At that time, the town had about 1,000 inhabitants and reached as far as the bridge over the River Schwentine in the east and to the end of today's pedestrian zone in the west. Both entrances were protected by gates.

In 1761, the Duchy fell back into the hands of the Danish crown. Plön remained under Danish rule until the Second Schleswig War in 1864. Although it was the Danish king's summer residence from time to time, it remained otherwise a sleepy provincial town of about 2,000 inhabitants. In 1867, Plön became a county town following the introduction of Prussian administrative reforms.

After World War II (1939-1945), Plön was chosen as the site for King Alfred School, a secondary school for British Forces children under the headmastership of Freddie Spencer Chapman (1907-1971), a British Army Officer, with his staff at the Ruhleben Barracks site and can rightly claim to be the first fully comprehensive school in the UK system. The school existed from 1948 to 1959.

The town’s coat of arms is quite interesting and shows a red fish swimming in the lake under a low crenellated (with battlements) wall made of red bricks, on a silver background. On top of the wall there is a short crenellated tower with two blackened window arches above which hovers Holstein's coat of arms - a silver nettle leaf.

The Venue

Der Große Plöner See

The games were themed around the American Red Indians and played on a grassed area on the shore of the Großer Plöner See, the largest of the numerous lakes surrounding the town. The lake, located to the south of the town, lies wholly within the Holstein Switzerland Nature Park - a picture-postcard region of lakes, woods and gently rolling hills - with its main tributary, as well as its main outflow, being the 62km (38½ miles) long River Schwentine. At its greatest, it measures 8.3km x 7.1km (5¼ miles x 4½ miles) and covers a surface area of 29.97km² (11.57mi²), with a total shore length of 49.6km (30¾ miles). It has a maximum depth of about 58m (190ft), although its average depth is around 13.5m (44ft 3in), and its surface elevation is around 21m (69ft) above sea level.

 
View from Großer Plöner See with the island of Olsborg (right)
and Plön Castle in the background
 

The lake, owned both by the state of Schleswig-Holstein as well as various private individuals, is classed as eutrophic - a body of water that has a high biological productivity due to excessive nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, and is able to support an abundance of aquatic plants - and emerged as a consequence of the glaciation of Schleswig-Holstein after the last ice age. Its surroundings are a popular recreational area for residents of the metropolitan areas of Kiel, Lübeck and Hamburg as well as a centre of tourism within the Holstein Switzerland. There are a total of 15 bathing sites. Some campsites are located directly on the lakeshore. There is a wide range of recreational activities such as boating, sailing, diving and fishing and during the summer months, pleasure boats ply the lake.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Canoes

The first game - ‘The Canoes’ (Die Kanus) - was the first of four to be played on the lake. It was played in unison over four minutes duration and witnessed the home team of Plön am See presenting their Joker for play. It featured four competitors (three males and one female) from each team and a cleverly-conceived canoe comprising two halves. On the whistle, two of the male competitors had to row 50m (164ft) across the lake aboard one half of the canoe. On reaching the other side, they were joined by the third male who had the other half of the canoe in his possession. Once the two halves of the canoe had been placed together, they rowed back to the start where they were joined by the female competitor. Once aboard, the team had to make a final journey across the lake to the finish line. It should be noted that the two halves of the canoe did not attach together physically, instead the competitors had to hold the two halves together manually. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, it was a neck and neck race with both team reaching the other side of the lake after 1 minute 6 seconds of elapsed time, but the home team were the quicker of the two in assembling the two parts of the canoe and starting their return journey. With the Wetter an der Ruhr suffering a mishap on this journey after two parts of the canoe separated, it permitted the home team to further increase their lead and virtually secure victory. On reaching the start line after 2 minutes 1 seconds, the Plön am See team were joined by their squaw for the final journey across the lake. By the time the visitors had collected their squaw after 2 minutes 39 seconds, the home team were halfway across the lake. With a perfect finish, the home team completed the game in 3 minutes 7 seconds.

Having played the Joker, the first 4pts were awarded to Plön am See and they were leading Wetter an der Ruhr 4-0.


Game 2 - The Peace Pipe

The second game - ‘The Peace Pipe’ (Die Friedenspfeife) - was played individually over four minutes duration and featured five male competitors from each team and a 7m (22ft 11¼in) long peace pipe comprising seven parts sitting on as seven equally-spaced podiums. On the whistle, the five competitors had to work together by pushing against the pipe from either end and supporting the middle parts in order to lift the pipe off the podiums. They then had to transport the pipe along the 50m (164ft) course comprised of two obstacles - a small ramp and a large horizontal tree trunk. Once they had negotiated the obstacles, they then had to place the pipe back onto seven podiums at the end of the course. If the pipe fell apart whilst the team was negotiating an obstacle, the pipe had to be reassembled in front of the obstacle and the attempt repeated. At the end of the four minutes, a timer inside the bowl of the pipe would create black smoke to bellow out from inside. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Plön am See and they got off to a slow start but once into their rhythm they made progress up the course. However, whilst negotiating the small ramp, the lead competitor inadvertently permitted his right foot to step off the downward side. This error was quickly noticed by referee Hans Ebensberger and instructed to go back to the start of the obstacle. After recomposing itself, the team negotiated the ramp successfully and moved onto the next obstacle. Once again luck was not on their side after the pieces of the pipe separated and fell to the ground after 2 minutes 57 seconds of elapsed time. The bowl of the pipe then began to bellow out smoke too early and a stagehand moved in to douse its progress with a bucket of water. With limit time fast approaching, the home team recomposed itself once more and struggled to negotiate the tree trunk. Disaster was to strike again after 3 minutes 5 seconds, just prior to the final competitor’s attempt to step over the tree trunk, when the team did not maintain the pressure on the pipe and it fell apart. With very little remaining, the team had no chance of the completing the game and were deemed out of time after the whistle was sounded, 15 seconds later. The second heat saw the participation of the visitors and it was a completely different story to that of the first. The team appeared to have learned from their rivals’ errors and were sleeker in their performance, having time to stop halfway down the course to recompose itself. The Wetter an der Ruhr team completed the game without mishap in 2 minutes 31 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Wetter an der Ruhr and they were now trailing Plön am See 4-2.

Point to Note: Whilst the game was reset for the second heat, there was a short interlude to introduce Chief Blau Adler (Blue Eagle), leader of a local American Red Indian Society, who demonstrated the use of an actual peace pipe.


Game 3 - The Kon-Tiki Rafts

The third game - ‘The Kon-Tiki Rafts’ (Die Kon-Tiki Flöße) - was played in unison on the lake over two minutes duration and featured a five competitors (four males and one female) from each team and a Kon-Tiki raft. On the whistle, the two male competitors had to punt the raft up a 50m (164ft) course which was spanned by five wires. When the team approached the wires, the competitors had to step or jump over them whilst the raft passed underneath and at the end of the course, a large drum was handed to the team. The course then had to be repeated in the opposite direction with the added difficulty of carrying the drum over the wires. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The Wetter an der Ruhr team got the better start in this straightforward game and reached the end of the course without mishap after 39 seconds of elapsed time followed by the home team after 41 seconds. It was then a race back to the start with the Plön am See team closing the deficit within seconds and taking the lead. With both teams negotiating the final hurdles successfully, the visiting team found a final burst of energy to close the deficit and both teams reached the finishing line in the exact same time of 1 minute 23 seconds.

Each team were awarded 1pt and Plön am See were now leading Wetter an der Ruhr 5-3.


Game 4 - The Chieftains

The fourth game - ‘The Chieftains’ (Die Häuptlinge) - was played in unison over five minutes duration and although was basic in design, it emerged as a most hilarious game. It featured a blindfolded male competitor from each team wearing a very large Indian chief’s caricatured head and armed with a small bucket. On the shore there was a makeshift open-fire with a cooking pot hanging from above. Before the start of the game, the competitor was positioned so that he was facing the lake and, on the whistle, he had to make his way forward into the lake and fill the bucket with water. He then had to turn around and make his way back to the fire and pour the water into the pot. This was repeated for the remainder of the game. The team collecting the greater amount of water would be declared the winners.

As soon as the competitors were released, they both headed for the lake and each gathered up a bucketful of water. The home team was the first to successfully locate its pot after 1 minute 5 seconds of elapsed time followed by the Wetter an der Ruhr competitor after 1 minute 25 seconds. After this, it was a game of chance with each of the competitors oblivious to their actual positions and finding themselves on the wrong side of the arena, at their opponent’s pot or being guided back on course by the referees. A second bucket for the visitors was emptied into their pot after 3 minutes 20 seconds whilst the home team repeated the feat 17 seconds later. A third bucket for Wetter an der Ruhr was emptied into their pot after 4 minutes 47 seconds and would be the final scoring on the game. After five minutes of joyful television - a record duration for a West German domestic game - the results were revealed. Whilst both competitors had collected two bucketsful of water each, Wetter an der Ruhr had a total of 14cm (5½in) of water in their pot as opposed to Plön am See’s 10cm (4in) of water.

The 2pts were awarded to Wetter an der Ruhr and the scores were now level at 5-5.

Point to Note: Unlike most games of this ilk, the blindfold competitors had no assistance from ‘sighted’ team-mates to give directions etc. The competitors appeared to have had to have memorised the layout of the game beforehand and in some instances this assisted them in finding the pot. However, for the majority of the time, the Plön am See competitor was hopelessly lost and had to be continually assisted back into the game’s playing arena by the referees. This provided some great moments of hilarity, particularly in a couple of instances when assistant referees Peter Hochrath and Werner Treichel guided the competitor back on course, only to find that he was having none of it and immediately did a U-turn to return to the area that he had just been led away from! A classic Willi Steinberg designed game.


Game 5 - The Paddle Horses

TThe fifth game - ‘The Paddle Horses’ (Die Paddelpferde) - was played in unison on the lake over three minutes duration and featured two male competitors from each team standing on the back of a polystyrene horse which had a paddle wheel on each side of its body. On the whistle, the competitors had to use one foot to propel the wheels forward and steer the horse through a 50m (164ft) slalom course comprising four gates, whilst at the same time maintaining their balance. Once they reached the end of the course, they had to turn around and return to the start in the same manner. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

This was yet another neck and neck race with the visitors having the slight edge on the home team on the outward journey. Reaching the turnaround point in 1 minute 8 seconds, they were just one second ahead of their rivals. The return journey saw the visitors maintaining their slight lead but they soon suffered a setback after misjudging their angle of entry into the third of the four slalom gates. This mishap permitted the home team to close the deficit and take the lead, which they maintained for the remainder of the game and finished in 2 minutes 31 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Plön am See and they were now leading Wetter an der Ruhr 7-5.


Game 6 - Crimping the Clothes

The sixth game - ‘Crimping the Clothes’ (Crimpen der Kleidung) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and was a very unusual game and one that did not quite fit into the theme of the programme. It featured a male competitor from each team sitting on a podium dressed in a shirt and trousers whose arms and legs measured 10m (32ft 9¾in) in length. On the whistle, the competitor had to use his hands (which were inside the arms of the shirt) to crimp the material backwards up his arms so that he could free his hands to do the same with the legs of the trousers. Once his hands and feet were free, he had to jump down off the podium and run to a large drum and place a feathered band around his head. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, it was apparent that the visiting competitor was faster and more adept in his execution of the game and had his hands free after 1 minute 21 seconds. Although the home competitor appeared to have emulated the same time as his rival, the arms of his shirt had not been fully crimped and this caused him some difficulty in his efforts to crimp the trousers. Wetter an der Ruhr maintained their lead throughout the game and finished in 2 minutes 15 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Wetter an der Ruhr and the scores were level once again at 7-7.


Game 7 - The Totem Poles

The seventh game - ‘The Totem Poles’ (Die Totemfähle) - was played in unison and witnessed the visiting team of Wetter an der Ruhr presenting their Joker for play. It featured three male competitors from each team (one which began the game tethered to a totem pole) and an obstacle course comprising a tunnel and a total of five hollowed-out tree trunks and stumps. On the whistle, two competitors paddled a canoe 50m (164ft) across the lake to the shore, where they disembarked. They then had to negotiate the six obstacles and run to the totem pole and rescue their team-mate. Once released, all three of the competitors then had to negotiate the obstacles in the opposite direction and return to the canoe. It was then a straight 50m race back to the start. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

It was soon apparent as to the reason the visitors had opted to play their Joker on this very straightforward game. Getting the better start, they held a slight lead from the outset which they maintained throughout. Entering the water four seconds ahead of their rivals for the return journey, the Wetter an der Ruhr team increased their lead further and finished the game in 1 minute 45 seconds, seven seconds ahead of Plön am See.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Wetter an der Ruhr and they were now leading Plön am See 11-7.


Game 8 - The Dance of Death

The eighth game - ‘The Dance of Death’ (Der Totentanz) - was played individually over one minute duration and featured a male competitor from each team and a giant effigy of a Thunderbird - a supernatural bird of power and strength - with large splayed wings. Surrounding the effigy, there was a circular podium on which four male opposition wearing headbands stood at equidistant points. Attached to the headbands were two wooden feathers set at right angles to each other. On the whistle, the competitor had to rotate the effigy by running around the inside of the podium whilst holding onto a pole which extended horizontally over the perimeter of the podium. In the meantime, the opposition had to jump over the pole and avoid the wings of the bird making contact with the feathers on their headbands as it swept over the podium above. Any method could be adopted to clear the pole but if the wings of the bird made contact with either of the feathers, the opposing team member would be eliminated from the game. The team eliminating all the opposition in the faster time or the one with the greater number of opposition eliminated would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Plön am See and their competitor was unable to eliminate any of the opposition. The second heat saw the participation of the visitors and although the competitor hared around the circle at a greater speed than his counterpart, he was also unable to eliminate any of the opposition. The referees declared the game a draw at 0-0.

Each team were awarded 1pt and Wetter an der Ruhr were now leading Plön am See 12-8.


Game 9 - Catching the Fish

The ninth game - ‘Catching the Fish’ (Auffangen des Fisch) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and was the last of the four games to be played on the lake. It featured three competitors (two males and one female) from each team in a canoe which was tethered to a jetty by an elasticated rope. On the whistle, the two males paddled the canoe up the course to a point where a shoal of 28 fish (in four rows of seven) were located. Whilst the males struggled against the pull of the elasticated rope and keeping the canoe stationery, the female had to grab as many of the fish as possible and place them in the canoe. The fish could be grabbed from any of the rows and tactics could be used to position the boat to maximise the number of fish that could be collected and lessen those available to the opposition. The team collecting the greater number of fish would be declared the winners.

At the end of this uneventful game, which saw the visiting team position their boat in the better location, the Wetter and der Ruhr team had collected 9 fish whilst the home team had collected just 5 fish.

The 2pts were awarded to Wetter an der Ruhr and, with only two games remaining to play and now leading Plön am See 14-8, they had already secured overall victory.


Game 10 - The Chicken's Eggs

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘The Chicken’s Eggs’ (Die Hühnereier) - was played individually over one minute duration and featured a chicken laying eggs and eight unseen competitors (five males and three females) from each team with their arms through holes in a wall which featured caricatures of Indian braves and squaws. On the whistle, the first competitor removed a large egg from the chicken’s backside and passed it to his other hand. He then passed it to the second competitor who repeated his actions and passed it onto the third competitor. Once the egg had been received in the second hand of the eighth competitor, it then had to be pushed through a hole in the mouth of the final caricature and dropped into a box. The game continued simultaneously throughout so that several eggs were in motion at all times. It should be noted that the holes used by the competitors were set at varying heights and the competitors were unable to see the actual egg as it moved along the line. The team collecting the greater number of eggs would be declared the winners.

The first heat of this very simple game saw the participation of Wetter an der Ruhr and they collected a total of 13 eggs. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and, encouraged on by the home crowd, they were quicker in their execution of the game and they collected a total of 16 eggs.

The 2pts were awarded to Plön am See and they were now trailing Wetter an der Ruhr 14-10.


Game 11 - The Tomahawks

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Tomahawks’ (Die Tomahawks) - was played individually and featured a male member of the public armed with four tomahawks representing his respective team. On the whistle, he had to throw the tomahawks one at a time at four large painted masks on high podiums. The team dislodging the greater number of masks would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of the Plön am See representative and after failing on his first three attempts, he was successful in removing a mask with his final tomahawk. The second heat saw the participation of the visiting representative and he completed the game in the exact reverse to his counterpart. Brimming with success after his first throw, he failed to remove any other masks with his final three throws and the game ended in a 1-1 draw.

The final 2pts of the contest were shared and both teams were awarded 1pt each. The final scoreboard showed that Wetter an der Ruhr had beaten Plön am See by 15-11.

Point to note: Each of the representatives was handed the painted mask disc that he had removed from the podium to keep as a souvenir of his participation in the programme. A nice touch and possibly valued commemorative item.

Additional Information

The surviving archive recording of this heat overran its allotted slot and survives incomplete with the end credits missing. This was the result of presenter Camillo Felgen’s insistence that he introduced members of the Leck team that were in the assembled crowd and who would be hosting the following week’s heat. Despite wishing everybody at home a final goodbye, he was informed that the team were in the audience and began his introductions!

Made in Colour • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1971

Heat 7

Event Staged: Saturday 5th June 1971
Venue: Nordfrieslandstadion (North Frisian Stadium), Leck,
Schleswig-Holstein, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 5th June 1971, 2.30-3.45pm (Live)

Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Helmut Konrad and Werner Treischel

Weather Conditions:
Hot and Sunny

Theme: Die Geschicten von Eulenspiegel (The Tales of Eulenspiegel)

Teams: Jever v. Leck

Team Members included:
Leck - Paul Brodovin, Friedrich Ratze.

Games: The Shoes, The Barber’s Windows, The Milkmaids, The Furriers, The Moving Bridge, The Owls and the Monkeys, The Beehives, The Blacksmiths, The Broken Pots, The King’s Jester, The Owl’s Plumage.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
J 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 0 2 2
L 2 2 2 2 0 2 0 2 4 0 0
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
J 0 0 0 0 2 2 6 6 6 8 10
L 2 4 6 8 8 10 10 12 16 16 16

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 L • Leck
 J Jever

16
10

Leck qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Oostende, Belgium:
staged on Wednesday 1st September 1971

The Host Town

Leck, Schleswig-Holstein

Leck is a town, with a population of around 7,500 inhabitants, and municipality in the northern state of Schleswig-Holstein. The town is located 30km (18½ miles) west of Flensburg, 384km (238½ miles) north-west of Berlin, 667km (414½ miles) north of Stuttgart and just 15km (9¼ miles) south of the Danish border town of Sæd. The local language in the area is called Plattdüütsch (or Low German) and despite the reducing numbers which speak it, the town continues to keep the language alive by providing speech lessons for those that are keen to learn.

The town, which spends at least three months of the year with temperatures hovering around 0°C (32°F) due to its northerly location, was first mentioned in 1231 as a medium size Königsgut (royal estate) of Danish King Waldemar II (1170-1241) and belonged to the Duchy of Schleswig. However, archaeological finds date the castle Leckhuus to the 11th century. In 1689, the town was granted market rights and the craft and commercial establishments were more numerous and more diverse than anywhere else in the country. The town attracted saddlers, blacksmiths and wheelwrights, dyers, tailors and cobblers, carpenters, turners and other professionals. There was also a hospital, a pharmacy, a post office and a school. During the Second World War (1939-1945), Leck Air Base was constructed for the former Nazi Luftwaffe.

 

The design of the Town Hall is in complete contrast
to many of the town’s other thatched buildings

 

One of the best places to visit is the Climatic Spa which offers a whole array of activities including swimming, hydro-massage and tanning beds. There are a number of 18-hole golf courses nearby and one can enjoy Nordic Walking, hiking and cycling. For the more adventurous, the town is close to the Wattenmeer (Wadden See), which stretches 500km (310 miles) from the north-western Dutch coastal town of Den Helder, along the north coast of Germany and north to Esbjerg on Denmark’s western coast, and caters for extreme sports such as kite-surfing and mudflat hiking.

The Venue

Nordfrieslandstadion

The games were based on the adventures of Till Eulenspiegel and played on the football pitch of the Nordfrieslandstadion. The multi-purpose stadium currently has approximately 1,800 members and is one of the biggest in the district of Nordfriesland. It offers a wide range of sports with handball, football, swimming and gymnastics being its mainstays. Other sports include tennis, badminton, volleyball, cross-country skiing, cycling, chess and martial arts such as judo, karate and aikido.

 
The Nordfrieslandstadion in Leck offers a
wide range of sports and other facilities to all age groups
 

The stadium is home to local club MTV Leck von 1889 (Männerturnverein Leck 1889) which has both a men’s and women’s football team. The women’s team played the 1996/97 season in the Oberliga Nord, the then second division and the 2013/14 season saw the team finish in third place of the Erbandsliga Nord (North Association League) of the Schleswig-Holsteinischen Fußballverbands (Schleswig-Holstein Football Association).

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Shoes

The first game - ‘The Shoes’ (Die Schuhe) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured six competitors (three males and three females) from each team and 20 giant foam rubber shoes of varying colour and size. On the whistle, a funambulist dropped the shoes from above and the competitors, each attired with a left boot and sock of varying colour, rushed in to find the matching right boot and sock and placing it on their foot. The team collecting all six correctly matched pairs in the faster time would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game, which was surprisingly completed in a fast time by both teams, saw Leck finish the game in 47 seconds and Jever finish in 50 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were leading Jever 2-0.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 4 - How Eulenspiegel relieved the townsfolk of 120 shoes, over which they fought, making young and old tear their hair over them - the story tells of how Till explained to the villagers that he would show them a trick but needed their assistance. Whilst he tied a rope across the street from the gables of two buildings he told them to remove their left boot or shoe and give it to him.

At first they were reluctant to do so, but then one after the other they removed their left footwear and in no time at all Till had one hundred and twenty left shoes and boots. He tied them all together by their laces and climbed up a ladder and on to the rope carrying a small mountain of shoes and boots. Below him, staring up with anticipation stood one hundred and twenty onlookers, each wearing only one shoe. Then Till started across the rope carefully balancing his heap of shoes and slowly moving one foot ahead of the other. When he reached the middle, he started untying the laces and shouted, “Now, watch this!”

He then let all the shoes fall to the street below. “There, you now have your boots back,” he cried, “But be careful that you don’t get them mixed up.” In the middle of the street, there now lay one hundred and twenty boots, clogs, sandals and shoes surrounded by a similar number of villagers. Like crazy, they all jumped on the pile of shoes and looked for their own. In minutes there was a battle royal taking place in the street. People were hitting each other, tearing each other’s clothes and hair and yelling, crying and shouting. It eventually took 1 hour 43 minutes for everyone to finally find his or her own left shoe.


Game 2 - The Barber's Windows

The second game - ‘The Barber’s Windows’ (Die Barbiere Fenster) - was played individually and featured a male competitor from each team and two window frames, each with nine panes of ‘glass’, and a row of 12 elasticated ropes spanning the 8m (26ft 8in) course. On the whistle, the competitor had to break through one of the panes (which in reality were made of paper) to enter the shop and make his way across to the other window via the elasticated ropes. On reaching the window, he then had to break through one of its panes to exit the shop and then turn around and break through a second pane to re-enter the shop. He then made his way back across to the first window and break out of the shop. He then repeated the game by breaking in and continued until he had completed nine runs in total and broken all 18 panes. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Jever and their competitor appeared the make the game look easy and completed it in 1 minute 20 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and their competitor completed the game with more veracity than his rival and completed the game in 1 minute 6 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were now leading Jever 4-0.

Point to Note: Although the competitors could choose which of the nine panes to break, only a specific number could be broken on each run. The first window had to have its panes broken in the following order - 1st (entry), 2nd and 3rd (exit and entry), 4th & 5th, 6th and 7th and 8th and 9th - whilst the panes of the second had to be broken - 1st and 2nd (exit and entry), 3rd and 4th, 5th and 6th, 7th and 8th and finally the 9th (exit).

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 73 - How Eulenspiegel hired himself out to a barber in Hamburg and entered his shop through the windows - the story tells of how Eulenspiegel went to Hamburg and found himself in the hops market. As he was standing there he was approached by a local beard-shearer who enquired where he was from and what his craft was. Eulenspiegel replied by saying that he was from nowhere in particular and that he was a barber.

The barber hired him and pointed to the house where he lived and told him, “See the house over there with the high windows? Go in there and I’ll be along in a minute.” Eulenspiegel went there and entered through the closed high windows. The barber’s wife, sitting in the shop spinning wool, heard the glass breaking and became frightened. On seeing Eulenspiegel, she enquired why he had come through the windows and not used the door. He told her that her husband had hired him and it was he that had told him to do this. He enquired of her whether a servant should do as he was asked. The barber then appeared and seeing the shattered glass enquired as to the reason why he entered the house through the windows and not the door.
Eulenspiegel replied, “My dear sir, it was you who told me to enter where the high windows were. You were to come along after me. Well, I did what you asked of me but you did not come after me, although you told me to go first.” The barber said nothing, as he needed him, and thought to himself that to recoup any losses he would deduct it from his wages.

After working for three days, the barber told Eulenspiegel to sharpen the shearing knives by making them even on the back like the blade. He started sharpening the knives and the barber espied that he was making the reverse edges like the blades and that he was also about to sharpen the knives he had lying on the grindstone. The barber stopped him and told him that he was a fool and to leave his employ immediately and to go back from where he had come. With this Eulenspiegel went into the shop and jumped back out through the windows.


Game 3 - The Milkmaids

The third game - ‘The Milkmaids’ (Die Milchmädchen) - was played in unison over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured three female competitors from each team. On the whistle, the competitors, each armed with a bucket, had to run to the end of the 30m (98ft 5¼in) course to reach a large container of milk. Once they had filled their buckets, they had to return to the start via a barn which was criss-crossed by elasticated ropes. Any milk remaining in the buckets was emptied into a large Perspex container. The game was then repeated and the team collecting the greater amount of milk would be declared the winners.

Although both teams set off at the same time, it was not long before the home team had the advantage and completed all their three return journeys in 28 seconds, five seconds ahead of their rivals. After this the Leck trio continued to build on their lead and completed 14 return journeys in total as opposed to 12 by the Jever team. The two additional journeys were reflected in the score with Leck collecting 97.2kg (214lb 4oz) of milk and Jever collecting 86kg (189lb 8oz) of milk.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were now leading Jever 6-0.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 69 - How Eulenspiegel bought milk from the country women in Bremen and mixed it all together - the story tells how one day Till found himself in the large northern city of Bremen. This was a place that he had not yet visited and he wanted to do some great mischief that the city would remember him by.

Bremen had a large market square and one morning when all the farmer’s maids from the surrounding towns and villages came to sell their milk, he set up a huge wooden barrel in the middle of the square. As the maids arrived, he offered to buy all their milk at a very good price. One after the other, they eagerly emptied their containers into the barrel while Till marked the amount each one had sold to him on the side of the barrel with a piece of chalk. Soon his barrel was full to the very brim and its sides were completely covered with his chalk markings. Meanwhile a crowd had gathered in the square and wondered what he was going to do with all that milk.

When there was no more milk to be bought, the maids started asking for their money. “Right at this moment I don’t have any money,” said Till. “But I’m going to be back here at the market in fourteen days and then I’ll pay you everything I owe you right down to the penny.” This resulted in a hullabaloo with all the maids shouting and yelling, calling him a crook and a thief and demanding the police come and arrest him.

“What do you want of me,” shouted Till. “I promise I will pay you. But if that doesn’t satisfy you, and to show you how honest I am, I’ll make you a deal. Those of you who don’t want to wait for fourteen days have my permission to take their milk back out of the barrel. But pay strict attention, don’t take out more than you put in.”

This raised an even greater cry with the maids shouting so loud that it caused three of the windows in the courthouse to shatter. The maids all stormed the barrel with their pails, bottles, cans and pots and because they each wanted to be first, the result was a complete riot. They hit each other with their vessels and the milk splashed high into the air covering them and their clothes. Finally, the huge barrel toppled over and the whole market place was covered with milk. It looked as if there had been a milk storm that day. The maids fell to the ground, flopping around in the milk, and the watching crowd laughed so hard they thought their sides would split.


Game 4 - The Furriers

The fourth game - ‘The Furriers’ (Die Kürstner) - was played in unison over two minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team and a stuffed wolf mannequin on wooden legs. On the whistle, the competitor had to collect a cloth from a tailor’s dummy and the end of a rope and run with both to the end of the 20m (65ft 7½in) course where the mannequin was located. He then had to attach four large castors to the legs of the wolf and once upright had to place the cloth around the mannequin and secure it in place underneath with drawstrings. He then had to sit on the back of the wolf and pull on the rope, which was attached to a pole at the other end, and travel back to the start whilst negotiating an obstacle course comprising a wooden framework on the ground and a small hillock. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Although both teams were neck and neck during the first 45 seconds of the game, the home team took the lead when the Jever competitor failed to keep the momentum of the wolf steady and got caught on the last of the three horizontal slats of the framework. Despite his efforts, he could not muster the strength to pull the wolf over the wooden slat and stayed put whilst his rival increased his lead and finished the game in 1 minute 16 seconds. Despite freeing himself and reaching the small hillock, which he failed to negotiate, the Jever competitor was ruled out of time.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were now leading Jever 8-0.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 53 - How Eulenspiegel in Berlin, made wolves for a furrier, instead of wolf-pelts - tells the story of a Swabian furrier living in Berlin. He was quite skilful in his profession and very frugal with his expenditures. As a result, he was very rich and ran a fine workshop. His clientele included the local prince, the nobility and many good people and citizens. One winter, the prince decided to hold a great court with races and tournaments. He wrote announcements of this to his noblemen and other lords and since nobody wanted to be omitted, many ‘wolf-pelts’ (coats) were ordered from the furrier. Eulenspiegel found out about this and went to the furrier to ask for work. Short of workers at the time, the furrier agreed and asked if Eulenspiegel knew how to make ‘wolves’. He told the furrier that in the district of Saxony he was well known for this sort of thing.

The furrier was overjoyed to hear this and told Eulenspiegel that he had come at the right moment and they came to an understanding about his wages. However, he informed the furrier that he preferred to work alone so that he could perform his work without interference. The furrier agreed and gave him a little room of his own and offered him many wolf skins, both large and small, that had been scraped and prepared as pelts. Eulenspiegel then got to work and began to cut the pelts making wolves out of all them, stuffing them with hay and shaping sticks for legs to make them lifelike. Once he had finished, he informed the furrier that the wolves were ready.

The furrier went to inspect the wolves and was shocked by what he observed. “What is this supposed to be?” he exclaimed. “May the plague be upon you! What a disaster you have brought on me! I’ll have you imprisoned and punished for this!”
“But I have acted in precise accordance to your wishes,” Eulenspiegel replied. “You told me to make wolves and I did. If you had wanted wolf-coats you should have told me.”

With this, the furrier banished him from his workshop and Eulenspiegel took his leave and headed for Leipzig.


Game 5 - The Moving Bridge

The fifth game - ‘The Moving Bridge’ (Die Bewegliche Brücke) - was played individually over two minutes duration and featured two male competitors from each team and a rotating bridge spanning a pool. On the whistle, the first of the competitors had to collect one of thirty large hoops from a rack and walk to the middle of the bridge. He then had to throw the hoop over an effigy of a large jester’s head which was located outside of the pool. He then dropped into the pool and returned to the start whilst his team-mate repeated the game. The team with the greater number of scoring hoops would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Jever and from the 16 journeys made onto the bridge, they successfully scored with the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 12th, 14th and 16th hoops, giving them a score of 9. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and they were slower than the visitors and could only make 14 journeys onto the bridge within the time permitted. Their aim was not as accurate either and only scored with their 6th, 7th, 11th, 12th and 14th hoops, giving them a score of 5.

The 2pts were awarded to Jever and they were now trailing Leck 8-2.

Inspiration for the Game: Loosely based on Tale No. 32 - How Eulenspiegel led the city patrol of Nürnberg into following him over a narrow bridge and falling into the water - the story tells of how Eulenspiegel was inventive in his roguishness. Whilst in the city, Eulenspiegel saw that the city patrol slept, with their armour on, in a large chamber under City Hall. He had also familiarised himself with the narrow bridges that crossed the Pegnitz river and, in particular, with the one adjacent to the hog market which was considered very dangerous to cross, especially at night.

One evening, after everybody was asleep and all was quiet, he broke three planks from the bridge and threw them into the river below. He then walked up to City Hall, started cursing, and beating on the plaster with an old knife until sparks began to fly. When the watchmen heard this, they were soon up and running after Eulenspiegel. He raced ahead of them and took flight towards the hog market. Once he reached the bridge, he carefully crossed it and once on the opposite side started yelling, “What are you waiting for, you weak-hearted scoundrels?”

On hearing this, the watchmen raced towards him and the bridge. Wanting to be the first and without thinking to look, they crossed the bridge and, as a result, fell one after the other into the river. Eulenspiegel called out, “Hey! Aren’t you coming after me? Tomorrow you may run after me some more.” None of the watchmen got out unhurt with several sustaining injuries to their arms and legs and gashes to their faces.


Game 6 - The Owls and the Monkeys

TThe sixth game - ‘The Owls and the Monkeys’ (Die Eulen and die Meerkatzen) - was played in unison over three minutes duration and featured a female competitor from each team attired in an evening dress and a total of six wooden statues (three owls and three monkeys) on a large table. On the whistle, the competitor had to run up the 30m (98ft 5¼in) course with one of the animals and place it in a holding pen. She then had return to the start via the barn criss-crossed with elasticated ropes utilised earlier in Game 3. The game was repeated and the team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

A straightforward game saw the home competitor getting the better start and she maintained the lead throughout. Although Leck completed the game in 2 minutes 20 seconds, the Jever competitor was not far behind and completed the game in 2 minutes 41 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were now leading Jever 10-2.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 19 - How Eulenspiegel apprenticed himself as a baker’s boy and how he baked owls and long-tailed monkeys - the story tells of how Eulenspiegel came to the city of Braunschweig and looked for an inn that he’d heard about. Not finding it, he stopped at a bakery and asked the baker how he might locate it and was given very good clear directions. However, when done, the baker asked him what it was that he did. Eulenspiegel responded by saying that he was a wandering baker’s apprentice.

On hearing this, the baker was very happy because he had been looking for an apprentice or traveller to help him in his shop. Eulenspiegel was hired on the spot for an agreed amount of salary together with room and board. For the first two days, the owner rarely had occasion to leave his bakery shop and go into the kitchen at the back to see Eulenspiegel at work. It was no surprise therefore that he didn’t immediately discover that Eulenspiegel knew as much about baking, as a cow knew about playing the piano. On the third day, the baker wanted to leave the shop early because he was tired and wanted to get a good night’s sleep. He told Eulenspiegel that he would have to stay in the bakery alone and do all the baking himself and that he would be back early the next morning. Stating that it was okay, he asked the baker what he wanted him to bake.

n hearing such a stupid question, the baker became angry and stated that he had never heard anything so dumb. “You are a baker’s apprentice and you have to ask me what you should be baking,” he growled. “Maybe you should bake owls and monkeys!” As soon as the baker had gone, Eulenspiegel started to busy himself. He made a big batch of bread dough, kneaded it, let it rise, shaped it carefully into rolls and then, from ten at night until three o’clock in the morning, he baked nothing but owls and monkeys. When the owner stepped into the shop early the next morning, he couldn’t believe what he was seeing and at first thought he had stepped into a zoo. Everywhere he looked there were crispy crusted little animals and not a single bread or regular roll to be found. Slamming his fist down on a table in a rage, he asked Eulenspiegel why he had baked such things.

“Well, you can certainly see,” said Eulenspiegel calmly, “Owls and monkeys - exactly like you asked me to. Aren’t they cute? I hope you find them so, because I worked very hard to make them.”

His response made the baker even angrier. He grabbed him by the collar, lifted him up and shook him as hard as he could and yelled at the top of his voice, “Out of my house now! Get out of here, you ragamuffin.”

“First you have to let go of me,” cried Eulenspiegel. “Otherwise, how can I leave?” The baker dropped him and he started heading for the door.

“Wait a minute,” said the baker, “You have to pay me for all the dough you ruined.”

“Only if you let me take my cute little animals with me,” answered Eulenspiegel. “If I have to pay you for the dough then they all belong to me.”

The baker grumpily agreed and, after paying him the amount he wanted, Eulenspiegel packed the entire owl and monkey shaped rolls into a large basket that belonged to the baker and, without a further word, left the shop.

As usual at noon, there was a large crowd in the city square. Some farmers had set up stands and all the workers and their wives were taking the lunch hour to shop and visit. Eulenspiegel stood in the middle of the square with his large basket next to him and started selling his owls and monkeys as fast as he could and ended up making a very handsome profit. Word soon spread and finally reached the ear of the baker. He quickly closed his shop and ran to the square.

“That crook has to reimburse me for the wood he used in the oven to bake his silly animal rolls,” he shouted as he ran through the cobblestone streets, “And a rental charge for the oven too. I’m going to have him arrested and locked in the city jail.”

But when he came to the square, Eulenspiegel was long gone. He had sold every one of his owls and monkeys and had even sold the basket he had taken from the baker. For the remainder of that year, the citizens of Braunschweig chuckled over what Eulenspiegel had done to the poor baker.


Game 7 - The Beehives

The seventh game - ‘The Beehives’ (Die Bienenkörbe) - was played in unison and witnessed the visiting team of Jever presenting their Joker for play. It featured two male competitors from each team and a large beehive on a litter. Before the game started, an opposition team member climbed inside the beehive whilst the lid was secured by the referees. On the whistle, the two competitors had to run 5m (16ft 5in) up the course and then crawl through a 15m (49ft 2½in) long net. Once executed, they each climbed inside a large thief costume which was holding the litter at either end. They then had to carry the litter back up the 25m (82ft) course whilst the opposition member tried to unbalance them by rocking the beehive from side to side. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

Although the home team got the better start and reached their costume first, their competitors were greatly hindered by the actions of the Jever opposition member inside the beehive. This permitted the Jever competitors to steal the lead and it appeared that they would storm home in a blaze of glory. However, they were to be thwarted by the Leck opposition who caused them to tumble to the ground just 5m from the finishing line. Whilst two team-mates rushed to their aid, the Leck team were closing the deficit. Back on their feet, the Jever team recomposed itself and moved up the course. With their lead competitor over the line and the rear competitor just three steps from doing the same, the team tumbled to the ground again. The Leck team were now hot on their heels and it appeared that they would cross the finishing line first. However, disaster struck and they also tumbled to the ground just as their lead competitor crossed the finishing line. By this time, the Jever team had recomposed itself once more and made the final steps to cross the finish line first in 1 minute 5 seconds.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Jever and they were now trailing Leck 10-6.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 9 - How Eulenspiegel crawled into a beehive; how two men came by night, intending to steal it; and how he made them tear each other’s hair and let the beehive drop - the story tells of how Till accompanied his mother to a neighbouring village for the dedication of a new church. As usual, he did not behave and drank too much beer and began feeling dizzy before the afternoon was over. He became very tired and looked for a nice, shady spot to take a little nap. Whilst walking through a quiet secluded garden belonging to a bee keeper, he noticed a bunch of large baskets standing on a row of benches. Some of the baskets had beehives in them with live bees but, as he looked in the baskets, he found an empty one. He climbed inside and pulled the lid shut and after making himself comfortable, promptly fell sound asleep. He slept all afternoon and into the evening, whilst his mother frantically looked for him throughout the church grounds and among the partygoers. Unable to find him, she decided that he must have gone home by himself.

Around midnight, two thieves sneaked into the garden to steal a beehive so they could sell the honey. “Let’s take the heaviest one,” said one of the thieves, “The heavier it is, the more honey it will have in it.”

“You’re absolutely right,” replied the other thief, as they went down the row of baskets lifting each one up. They decided that the heaviest one was the one that Till was sleeping in and they picked up the basket and carried it out of the garden, huffing and puffing, as they headed off to a nearby village.

With all the shaking and noise, Till woke up angry because the two men had bothered his sleep and also that they were carrying him to a village that he didn’t even live in. After a short while, he reached out from under the basket lid and gave the leading thief a mighty tug on his hair.

“Ouch!” cried the thief. Naturally thinking that the other thief had pulled his hair, he started yelling at him. “Have you gone crazy?”

The second thief couldn’t figure out what was going on and shouted back. “I’m lugging the heavy end of this basket like a furniture mover and you think that I have the energy left to yank on your hair? You’re crazy, yourself!”

Till thought that was pretty funny and after a while reached out again in the dark and yanked the hair of the thief at the back so hard, he pulled some of it out.

“Hey, what are you doing?” shouted that thief with a screech of anguish. “First you imagine that I tugged at your hair and now you yank on mine so hard you almost pulled my whole scalp off.”

“Idiot!” growled the first one. “It’s so dark, I can’t even see the street we’re walking on. I’m holding my end of the basket with both hands and you think I can reach in the back of me and tear your hair out? You’ve lost your marbles.”

With that, they continued yelling and shouting back and forth so much that Till almost laughed out loud. But that would have given the game away, so he kept quiet and waited another five minutes. He once again reached from under the lid, carefully took a good grip on the leading thief’s hair and pulled it so hard that the back of the thief’s head hit the rim of the basket with a loud crash. At the same time, Till stood up in the basket, turned around and hit the second thief smack in the face with both his fists. Both thieves let out loud screeches, dropped the basket and started hitting each other. Yelling, shouting, scratching and pummelling, they became all entangled and fell to the ground. However, even with their continuous shouting, they could not find each other in the darkness, nor the basket they had dropped. Throughout this time, Till kept quiet and within a short while, after the two thieves had wandered off, he fell sound asleep again until the rising sun woke him up in the morning.


Game 8 - The Blacksmiths

The eighth game - ‘The Blacksmiths’ (Die Schmeide) - was played in unison over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and featured a male competitor from each team attired with a single bed complete with a large padded duvet strapped to his back. On the whistle, the competitor had to pick up a blacksmith’s hammer weighing 7kg (15lb 7oz) and then had to flatten a total of 8 aluminium tools by hitting with the hammer on an anvil. Once small enough, he then had to pass the flattened tools through a wire-meshed window behind him. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

It was apparent from the outset of this straightforward game, that the home competitor was the stronger of the two and gradually built up a commanding lead. In desperation, the Jever competitor attempted to push the tools through the meshing without flattening them correctly and instead of this assisting him, it only made matters worse when the tools became jammed and he lost valuable seconds whilst he tried to release them. The game ended with Leck completing the task in 1 minute 42 seconds with Jever finishing in 2 minutes 28 seconds.

The 2pts were awarded to Leck and they were now leading Jever 12-6. With just three games to be played and a maximum 6pts available, the best that the visitors could hope for was a draw.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 39 - How Eulenspiegel hired himself out to a blacksmith, and how he carried the blacksmith’s bellows into his courtyard for him - the story tells of how Eulenspiegel hired himself out as an assistant to a blacksmith in Rostock. Now the blacksmith in question had a favourite saying, which he believed would get the most from his workers. Whilst Eulenspiegel was standing at the bellows and pumping, the blacksmith said in a harsh voice, “Hey! Hey! Follow with the bellows!” With these words, he went into the courtyard, planning to drain off his water. Eulenspiegel immediately placed one of the bellows on his shoulder and followed the blacksmith. “Sir, I am bringing the bellows. Where should I stick it? Eulenspiegel asked. “I will go and get the other one too.”

The blacksmith turned around and told him that that was not what he meant and to take the bellows back. He wondered how he could get even with Eulenspiegel and decided to wake up at midnight every night for five days and wake his assistant and make him work. In fact, he woke both his assistants and let them do some forging. Eulenspiegel’s fellow assistant questioned him, asking why the blacksmith had woken them so early, as he never had done this before. Eulenspiegel told his work-mate that he would find out the reason. The blacksmith told him, “It’s my custom that at the beginning - and for eight days - my boys do not sleep longer than half the night. Eulenspiegel kept quiet until the next night. On the stroke of midnight, the blacksmith woke them and his companion went to work. But Eulenspiegel took his bed and tied it to his back. When the iron was hot, he came running down from the attic to the anvil, crashing the bed against the anvil, so that the sparks spewed onto the bed.

The black thought he had gone crazy and enquired why the bed could not stay where it was supposed to be. Eulenspiegel responded by saying, “Don’t be angry. This is my custom - that during the first weeks I lie on the bed for half the night, and for the second half of the night, the bed lies on me.” On hearing this, the blacksmith became enraged and ordered him to replace the bed and get out of his house. Eulenspiegel climbed into the attic and returned the bed. He then found a ladder and stuck it against the coping and broke open the roof. He went out onto the roof with the ladder and set it in the street, climbed down and got away. The blacksmith, hearing loud noises, followed him into the attic with his other assistant. Furious at the damage caused, he hunted for a skewer and threw it at Eulenspiegel. The assistant tried to calm the blacksmith by explaining that his work-mate hadn’t really done anything wrong and had, in fact, done exactly as he had been asked.


Game 9 - The Broken Pots

The ninth game - ‘The Broken Pots’ (Die Zebrochenen Töpfen) - was played individually over 2 minutes 30 seconds duration and witnessed the home team of Leck presenting their Joker for play. It featured a female competitor from each team standing inside a large pear-shaped metronome located within a circular podium which had 16 items of crockery located at regular intervals around its perimeter. On the whistle, the competitor had to set the metronome in motion by rocking her body back and forth and, once in motion, she could choose to either break the items with a wooden stick or remove them from the podium by pushing them off with the stick. In order to move the metronome around the circle, the competitor had to push her weight to one side on her backward swing and line herself up for the next item. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat saw the participation of Jever and although their competitor appeared to execute the game at a steady pace, she failed to lower the metronome enough during the early stages which resulted in her having to take double swings at many of the items and this ultimately cost her valuable seconds. She eventually broke all the items and completed the game in 1 minute 59 seconds. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and despite a few teething problems with the first two items, once she had struck the correct rhythm, she virtually broke every other item on her first forward swing. It was no surprise, with the Joker at stake, that she completed the game in 1 minute 33 seconds.

Having played the Joker, the 4pts were awarded to Leck and now leading Jever 16-6, they had already secured overall victory.

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 86 - How Eulenspiegel made a woman break all her pots at the market in Bremen - the story tells of how, on his return to Bremen, he went to see the Bishop. The Bishop had a lot of fun with Eulenspiegel, and liked him too, since he was always engaged in some roguish adventure. One day, Eulenspiegel acted as if he had become tired of clowning and stated that he preferred going to church. The Bishop scoffed at this suggestion but Eulenspiegel refused to be dissuaded and went off to pray. This made the Bishop very annoyed.

Unbeknownst to the Bishop, Eulenspiegel had secretly made an arrangement with a potter’s wife who sold her wares at the market. He bought up all her pots and agreed with her on something she was to do when he waved or gave a signal. Eulenspiegel then went home and pretended that he had just been to church. The Bishop jeered at him until Eulenspiegel asked him to go to the marketplace with him. “There is a potter’s wife there selling clay pots. I will make a bet with you,” he said. “I will not speak to her or wink at her and without saying a word I will make her get up, grab a stick, and smash all the clay pots to pieces.” The Bishop said that he would like to see this but first offered to bet him 30 guilders that the woman would never do it. They shook hands on it and they both set off for the marketplace.

On arrival at the marketplace, Eulenspiegel pointed the woman out to the Bishop and they went across the street to City Hall. Eulenspiegel stayed close to the Bishop and made signs to the woman as if he wanted her to do something. Finally, he gave the woman the sign they had agreed on. She immediately got up, took a stick and smashed all her pots to pieces. Everybody in the marketplace laughed and clapped.

When the pair returned home, the Bishop told Eulenspiegel to tell him how he had made the woman break her own pots. Only then would he give him the 30 guilders he had won on the bet. Eulenspiegel agreed and told the Bishop the story of how he had paid for the pots beforehand and set the trick up with the woman. He had not used magic after all. The Bishop laughed at his ingenuity and paid his debt but made him promise not to tell anybody about it.


Game 10 - The King's Jester

The tenth and penultimate game - ‘The King’s Jester’ (Des Königs Spaßmacher) - was played individually over three minutes duration and featured a male competitor from each team dressed in a large jester’s head which had weights hanging down from either side of his hat. In the middle of the course, there was a 15m (49ft 2½in) podium on which the jester was standing and running along each side of the podium at regular intervals, there were 14 small mirrors and 14 wooden owls on pedestals. On the whistle, the competitor had to swing his body so that the weights swung outwards in order to knock down the items. The items had to be removed alternatively from each side and the team knocking down the 28 items correctly in the faster time would be declared the winners.

The first heat of this straightforward game saw the participation of Jever and they completed the game in exactly two minutes. The second heat saw the participation of the home team and their competitor was very erratic in his accuracy of his swings and knocked down 26 of the items in 2 minutes 14 seconds. However, the referees had deemed that he failed to knock the items down in the alternate order prescribed in the rules and therefore awarded him a score of 0:00.

The 2pts were awarded to Jever and they were now trailing Leck 16-8.

Point to Note: The name of Eulenspiegel literally translated into English is “owl’s mirror” and it was tongue-in-cheek that these were the items used in this game!

Inspiration for the Game: Based on Tale No. 24 - How Eulenspiegel, with a superior trick, humiliated the King of Poland’s jester - the story tells of how at the time His Highness Casimir was King of Poland. Staying with him was an adventurer of unusual humour and clowning. Eulenspiegel, who was also in Poland at the time, visited the King, who had heard a great deal about him. However, as the saying goes, two fools in one house seldom go well together, and when Eulenspiegel and the King’s fool met, things soon became embroiled.

The King’s jester disliked Eulenspiegel but, at the same time, did not wish to be ejected from the palace. The King realised this and summoned both of them to his chamber. He challenged them, “Whichever of you makes the wildest performance - one that the other cannot repeat after him - I will give new clothes and 20 guilders. Let’s get started right now.”

The two set about with their clowning, performing a lot of absurd tricks, with funny faces and peculiar speeches. However, whatever one of them thought up and did, the other repeated. The King laughed, along with his court, and they truly witnessed all manner of bizarre acts. Eulenspiegel then reflected that 20 guilders and a new wardrobe would be rather nice and decided to do something that would otherwise be unpleasant. He knew that the King’s attitude was that it was all the same to him who won the prize and by whatever means.

Unfortunately, the act that he performed is too distasteful to be described here but involved something that would be more at home with sadomasochism. The King’s fool stated that he would not copy what he did and Eulenspiegel won the championship and the King gave him his reward.


Game 11 - The Owl's Plumage

The eleventh and final game - ‘The Owl’s Plumage’ (Die Eule Gefieder) - was played in unison over one minute duration and featured a female member of the public representing her respective team and a large wooden owl with sectioned plumage on the body. On the whistle, the competitor had to pull at the individual sections to find the 10 that were not adhered with glue. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners.

From the outset, the Jever representative appeared to be ripping the plumage away from the body of the owl instead of finding the loose feathers and removing them whilst off-camera the home team representative had completed the game as per the rules in 48 seconds. The referees declared that although the Jever representative had removed 15 feathers, only 5 had been removed in the manner prescribed and therefore had discounted her score.

The final 2pts were awarded to the home team and the final scoreboard showed that Leck had beaten Jever by 18-8.

Additional Information

Till Eulenspiegel - the subject of the theme of this event - was an impudent trickster figure that appeared in 95 different tales originating from Middle Low German folklore. According to the tradition, he was born in Kneitlingen near Braunschweig around 1300. Till, named after his grandfather, travelled all through Germany as a clown causing trouble and becoming a nuisance wherever he went and, as such, his countrymen would be left seeing red whenever he showed up. Whilst growing up, Till had joined a circus and it was here that he perfected the art of balancing and dancing on the high wire. However, he never really enjoyed performing in a circus or at fairs because he didn’t like the way people laughed at him, preferring instead to do things that would let him laugh at others. He left the circus and wandered all over the German countryside and, given the chance, quickly agreed to any kind of work offered him in trades that he knew absolutely nothing about. In order, he was a baker, a shoemaker, a tailor, a sentry, a fortune-teller, a doctor, an ironsmith, a cook, a pastor, a carpenter, a butcher, a coal stoker and a University professor. There was not a trade or profession he wouldn’t try and not one did he perfect. After thinking about it, many of those that he fooled or made fun of, couldn’t help but laugh at themselves and held no ill feelings toward Till. But most of those he fooled stayed very angry at him and couldn’t wait to seek revenge. This would prove to be futile because most of them had a very poor memory while Till’s was excellent. After a year or two, he would return to the same village and fool them a second time with Till always having the last laugh. There are three museums in Germany featuring Eulenspiegel. One is located in the town of Schöppenstedt in Niedersachsen, which is nearby his assumed birthplace Kneitlingen. The second is located in the supposed place of his death, the city of Mölln in Schleswig-Holstein, and the third in Bernburg, Sachsen-Anhalt. There is also a fountain and statue featuring Eulenspiegel in the Marktplatz of Magdeburg, capital city of Sachsen-Anhalt.

Before the start of the first game, a demonstration on a tightrope was given by a member of the Circus Renz - a famous German circus family - above the arena. The circus had originally been established in Berlin in 1842 by Ernst Jakob Renz (1815-1892) as Circus Olympic. On 20th April 1879, the circus moved into the former Berlin market hall (later Friedrichstadt-Palast). In 1888, the auditorium was augmented to 5,600 seats. However, due to financial difficulties, Ernst’s son Franz, had to close the company on 31st July 1897. On 28th October 1899, Albert Schumann (1858-1939) took over the Berlin circus building and operated his own Circus Schumann until 1918. In 1940, Ernst Renz's great-nephew, Bernhard Renz (1921-2012), re-established a touring circus under the family name. When Bernhard died, he was the oldest recorded circus director at the age of 91. His descendants continue to this day to lead their own circuses, carrying the Renz name.

At the time of recording, Leck was celebrating its 740th anniversary and held the record as being the most-northern venue for any West German heat (Domestic or International). However, this record was to be short-lived and would be broken in 1972 when WDR staged the International heat at Westerland on the island of Sylt, 20km (12½ miles) further north-west.

The surviving archive recording of this heat overran its allotted slot and survives incomplete with the end credits missing. The reasons for this was that many of the games were delayed whilst presenter Camillo Felgen described the antics of Eulenspiegel and that some of the games had to be reset for their second heats which resulted in an extended wait whilst this was carried out.

Made in Colour • This programme exists in German archives

 

JSFnetGB Series Guide pages researched by
Alan Hayes, David Hamilton, Neil Storer, Christos Moustakas, Philippe Minet,
Sébastien Dias, Ischa Bijl, Paul Leaver and JSFnet Websites