Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968
West German Domestic Series

Presenter:
Camillo Felgen

Referees:
Kurt Hauser (except Heat 4)
Guido Pancaldi (Heat 4)

Assistant Referees:
Hans Ebensberger (Heats 4 and 6)
Peter Hochrath (Heats 3, 5 and 6)
Helmut Konrad (Heats 2, 4 and 5)
Gennaro Olivieri (Heat 1)
Guido Pancaldi (Heat 1)
Peter Treischel (Heats 2 and 3)

Games Designer:
Willi Steinberg

Producer:
Marita Theile

Directors:
Ekkehard Böhmer (Heats 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6)
Günther Hassert (Heat 4)

An ARD-WDR Production
 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 1

Event Staged: Saturday 27th April 1968
Venue: Ludwig-Schwabl-Stadion (Ludwig Schwabl Stadium),
Inzell, Bayern, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 27th April 1968, 4.00-5.15pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Kurt Hauser, Gennaro Olivieri and Guido Pancaldi

Weather Conditions:
Sunny and Warm

Theme: Spielzeit für Erwachsenen (Playtime for Adults)

Teams: Inzell v. Schongau

Team Members included:
Inzell -
Manfred Ellmann, Günther Traube, Jürgen Traube;
Schongau - Martin Hoffmann, Willi Kuner, Adolf Ott.

Games: The Go-Karters, The Giant Dolls, Downhill Skiing, Curling Baskets, Caged Ice-Hockey, The Great Pram Race, The Carousel Crossing, The Snowman Lift, The Giant Ostriches, The Guide Leader.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
I 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 4
S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
I 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 18 20 24
S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 I • Inzell
 S Schongau

24
0

Inzell qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Paris, France, due to be staged on Wednesday 19th June 1968. However, due to student riots in Paris, the venue was changed to Épinal. As the rioting continued and spread across France, it was subsequently cancelled.
Inzell ultimately participated in Schwäbisch Hall, West Germany:
staged on Wednesday 4th September 1968.

The Host Town

Inzell, Bayern

Inzell is a municipality and recognised health resort with a population of around 4,500 in the German state of Bavaria and is located approximately 6 miles (10km) north-east of the Austrian border. The town covers an area of 45.35km² (17.51mi²) and is surrounded by four mountains on all sides - the Rauschberg at 1,671m (5,482ft), the Zinnkopf at 1,227m (4,025ft), the Teisenberg at 1,333m (4,373ft) and the Staufen Massif at 1,782m (5,846ft).

 

Aerial view of the Bavarian town of Inzell

 

The town’s coat of arms is made up of a red background with a silver hammer and miner’s hammer crossed, lying below a silver fish. The silver fish is taken from the Augustinian priory of St. Zeno and the crossed miner’s tools remember the earlier mining and smelting industry of the town.

This popular Bavarian resort nestles in a large, sunny Alpine valley surrounded by lush green meadows, picturesque mountains and crystal clear lakes. In summer and winter there is always plenty to keep you fit - cross-country skiing, Alpine skiing, ski tours, snow shoe hikes, walking, sledding, climbing etc. Families are so well catered for, that Inzell qualifies as an accredited Kinderland Bayern® resort. The inhabitants of Inzell love Bavarian traditions and ensure that guests can experience them too, with most local farmhouses being built and decorated in the traditional style.

The magic of winter can be enjoyed either in an active way or in a more relaxed fashion with a moonshine walk on snowshoes through powdered snow or a more exhilarating sled ride followed by a visit to a cosy chalet where you can get warm in front of an open fire and enjoy a tasty mountain supper.

The town is now known for being the home of the National Training Centre for roller-skating and speed-skating, and was used as the training venue for German speed skaters Erhard Keller and Anni Friesinger-Postma. After retiring from the sport at the beginning of 1973, Erhard Keller went on to present the West German heats of Spiel Ohne Grenzen following the retirement of original host, Camillo Felgen.

The Venue

Ludwig-Schwabl-Stadion (Ludwig Schwabl Stadium)

The games at this heat were staged at the local ice stadium, the Ludwig-Schwabl-Stadion, named after Inzell-born German politician and sports official, Ludwig Schwabl (1921-2007). .

 

Aerial View of the former outdoor ice stadium at Inzell
with the Zwingsee lake in the foreground

 

Before 1963, ice-skating took place during the winter months on a makeshift course on the Frillensee, a lake located in the mountains which had a special feature in that it would freeze from the centre outwards, rather the reverse of other lakes. This course became very popular and it was decided that a larger facility had to be built not only to cater for the large numbers, but for health and safety reasons. Construction of a new natural ice stadium took place in the town adjacent to Zwingsee lake between 1963 and 1965 which would cater for speed skating, ice speedway and ice hockey, and one which could be used by locals and tourists alike all year round. It could also be used as a dry track during the summer months by melting the ice and allowing it to dry out, as was the case at this heat.

In June 2008, The International Skating Union (ISU) announced that Inzell had been successful in their bid and were awarded the World Single Distance Speed Skating Championships in 2011. However, a pre-requisite for this was that a new artificial indoor speed-skating hall be constructed. Work began in the autumn of 2009 and was completed in time for the Championships. The stadium was renamed as the Eishalle Max Aicher Arena in 2012 following sponsorship by German engineering and construction company, Max Aicher Bischofswerda GmbH & Co. During the summer months the hall can also be used for roller-skating.

The town of Inzell is now known for being the home of the National Training Centre for roller-skating and speed-skating, and was used as the training venue for German speed skaters Erhard Keller and Anni Friesinger-Postma. After retiring from the sport at the beginning of 1973, Erhard Keller went on to present the West German heats of Spiel Ohne Grenzen following the retirement of original host, Camillo Felgen.

Although the ice stadium venue had been drained and dried out for this event, the two semi-circular bends at either end were still wet on the day of the recording. This resulted in a few thrills and spills for the competitors during the games!

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Go-Karters

The first game - ‘The Go-Karters’ - was played by one competitor from each team and featured the petrol-driven go-karts utilised by presenter Camillo Felgen at the start of the programme (see ‘Additional Information’ section below) and two small hurdles covered with paper. The game was straightforward and required the two go-karters to make four laps of the 400m (1,312ft 4ins) track. After the go-karts were started by stagehands, the whistle was blown and the competitors released. On the first lap, they had to break through the paper as they passed under it, whilst the remaining three laps required them simply to pass under the hurdle. The only other obstacle on the course was a corrugated board which they had to pass over on the home straight of each lap. Although it was a one-horse race, there were some light-hearted moments when the Schongau competitor skidded on the wet bends at either end of the track. The race ended with Inzell completing the four laps in 2 minutes 34 seconds with Schongau finishing in 3 minutes 5 seconds. The first 2pts were awarded to the home team and they were leading 2-0 on the scoreboard.


Game 2 - The Giant Dolls

The second game - ‘The Giant Dolls’ - was hilarious to watch and featured two competitors from each team, two giant wooden dolls hanging from scaffolding and two small manually-operated scooters. On the whistle, the two teams, with the aid of a step-ladder, had to undress the giant dolls, which were clad out in underwear to save any blushes, and then one of the competitors had to attire himself in the three removed items of clothing - a hat, a jacket and a skirt. Once attired, he had to travel around the 400m track on the scooter and return to the same point where, with the assistance of his team-mate once more, he had to undress and re-clothe the doll. The game was started and once the competitors were dressed in the female attire, the fun began. The Inzell competitor appeared to be quite adept and very familiar with the fact that the long skirt needed to be lifted above the knees at the front to enable any progress to be made on the scooter. The Schongau competitor on the other hand was not so familiar with this and it resulted in his long skirt becoming entangled around the back wheel of the scooter, causing it to jam. The Inzell competitor took full advantage of his mishap and sped around the track. From this point in the game, the visiting team’s fate was sealed and only a disaster by the home team would prevent their second successive victory. With all the clothes intact the home team completed the game in exactly the same time as they had the first game, registering a time of 2 minutes 34 seconds whilst Schongau finished the game in 3 minutes 1 second. With another 2pts added to their score, Inzell were now leading Schongau 4-0.


Game 3 - Downhill Skiing

With the venue predominantly used for winter sports, it was fitting that the third game - ‘Downhill Skiing’ - was the first of four games to utilise the frozen ice-hockey rink located in the middle of the track. Played individually over two heats of three minutes duration, the game featured a miniature ski-slope and a set of three small hurdles placed along a 55m (180ft 5ins) track. On the whistle, three competitors descended the slope and at the base they posed in a crouched-down position, which they had to hold, to enable them to travel under the hurdles and reach a finish line. The distance achieved by each skier was measured and they then raced back to the slope, climbed to the top via a set of wooden slats and then repeated the game. Schongau participated first and on their first run all three of their skiers reached the finish line and registered a sub-total of 165m (3 x 55m). Their second run was not so successful with only two of the skiers reaching the line and, with the third stopping short, gave them a second total of 151.80m. The third run was even less successful and, with two the team failing to reach the finish line, the third total was 146.20m. The whistle was blown just before any of the team could descend for a fourth time and the overall total for the visitors was confirmed as 463m (165m + 151.80m + 146.20m). The second heat saw the home team of Inzell participate and they were quicker and more successful, achieving 4 runs each and all the competitors reaching the finish line on each run. This gave the team totals of 165m on each run and an overall total of 660m (4 x 165m). The home team were awarded another 2pts and were now leading by 6-0.


Game 4 - Curling Baskets

The cameras stayed on the rink for the fourth game - ‘Curling Baskets’ - which featured six competitors from each team. Each team were equipped with four large straw baskets inside which were four of the competitors. The course was marked out with six rings, each with a value ranging from 1pt for the outer ring and rising to 6pts for the innermost ring. On the whistle, the two remaining competitors from each team took it in turn to lift their respective baskets and swing them in order to pick up momentum and then slide them down the ice to the scoring rings. The team with the greater total from all four baskets would be declared the winners. It was clear from the start that the home team were to be victorious once more as their two ‘throwers’ were more heavily built than the opposition. Schongau went first and scored just 1pt whilst Inzell scored 5pts. The second round saw the visitors score 2pts whilst the home team repeated their first score of 5pts. The third round was a repeat of the first with Schongau and Inzell scoring 1pt and 5pts, respectively. With just one round remaining, Inzell had already secured victory but they did not sit on their laurels. Whilst Schongau missed the target completely and scored 0pts on their final attempt, Inzell went one better and, whilst scoring another 5pts, they conveniently edged the second of their baskets already on the ice into the 6pts ring. The game ended with Inzell having a total of 21pts (5 + 6 + 5 + 5) and Schongau with a total of just 4pts (1 + 2 + 1 + 0). Inzell had now opened up an 8pt lead with the scores showing 8-0.


Game 5 - Caged Ice Hockey

The fifth game - ‘Caged Ice Hockey’ - was played by four competitors from each team with a giant sized puck and saw referees Kurt Hauser and Gennaro Olivieri in their element, both being retired Olympic ice-hockey referees. Each of the competitors was standing in an inverted ‘V’ shaped contraption which had an open circular base which was utilised, in a similar fashion to a fairground dodgem car, to move the puck around the rink. At the start of the game only one of the competitors from each team was permitted on the field of play, with his three team-mates standing behind their respective goal line. On the whistle, Schongau set the game in motion with a bully-off and after a second whistle 3 seconds later, the other team members were permitted to join in the action. The idea of the game was very simple and straightforward, with the teams attempting to score as many goals as possible (in reality pushing the puck over a marked line at each end of the rink) within the time permitted. The first half of two minutes duration ended 3-0 in Inzell’s favour and for parity, the teams changed ends. The second half was goalless and the final score was 3-0 to Inzell. With the home team’s fifth consecutive victory, the scores were Inzell 10, Schongau 0.


Game 6 - The Great Pram Race

The sixth game - ‘The Great Pram Race' - witnessed the first Joker of the competition to be played by the Schongau team captain. The game featured a female competitor sitting inside an oversized pram and a male competitor dressed as a clown with giant shoes which had small castors attached to the soles. On the whistle, the clown had to push the pram along the 100m (328ft 1in) course and towards the end of its length, there was a row of 10 balloons. All the balloons had to be picked up by the clown and handed to the female competitor and then the pram pushed to a finish line. Once crossed, the clown then had to go to the back of the pram and push it all the way back to the start. Any balloons that were burst or not collected would each incur a 5-second penalty. The team with the faster overall time would be declared the winners. Another straightforward game saw the Inzell team finish in 1 minute 40 seconds followed by the Schongau team in 2 minutes exactly. The number of balloons were then counted and Schongau had collected only 8 balloons and incurred an additional 10 seconds, bringing their total time to 2 minutes 10 seconds. Inzell had collected 9 balloons and incurred an additional 5 seconds, bringing their total time to 1 minute 45 seconds. Inzell had won their sixth consecutive game and had wiped out the Schongau team’s Joker. The Inzell team were now leading 12-0 on the scoreboard and, even though they had yet to play their Joker, they already found themselves in an unassailable position with victory secured.


Game 7 - The Carousel Crossing

The seventh of the ten games - ‘The Carousel Crossing’ - was an entertaining game to watch and was played by three competitors from each team in two heats of 2 minutes 30 seconds duration. It featured a large carousel in the middle of a shallow pool with a podium on either side. Above the podium on which the competitors started the game, there were two rows of 9 inflatable rings and in the middle was a large pole which overhung the edge of the carousel. On the other side of the pool there was an exact copy of the equipment. On the whistle, each of the competitors collected a ring and placed it around their necks. One by one they had to jump up and grab the pole and then edge their way along it in order to cross the pool and drop down on the moving carousel. They then had to cross the carousel and then jump up to the other pole and edge their way along to the opposite podium and place the rings on holders. The team collecting the greater number of rings would be declared the winners. The Inzell team participated in the first heat and transported 12 rings across the pool. Although the Schongau team provided some enjoyable antics over the carousel for the spectators, they were no match for the home team and were only able to collect 9 rings. With a seventh consecutive win recorded for the home team, they were now leading 14-0.


Game 8 - The Snowman Lift

The eighth game - ‘The Snowman Lift’ - was played on the ice hockey rink and saw the Inzell team captain presenting the Joker for play. The game was played in unison and featured a speed-skater attached to a long elasticated rope located at one end of the 50m (164ft) course and five wooden snowmen at the other end. On the whistle, the competitors had to race up the rink to collect a snowman and bring it back to the start. This was then repeated until all five snowmen had been transported to the opposite end of the rink. The competitors then had to repeat the process in reverse by transporting the snowmen back up the course to their original start positions. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. It was obvious from the outset that the Inzell team had made a wise choice of Joker game and completed the game in 3 minutes 23 seconds. The team were awarded 4pts and with the scoreboard reading Inzell 18, Schongau 0, there was a 'buzz' around the arena that the team could go on to achieve a maximum score.


Game 9 - The Ostriches

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘The Ostriches’ - was a straightforward relay race played over 4 laps of the 400m track and featured two competitors from each team wearing roller-skates and dressed in giant ostrich costumes. Although Schongau got off to an early lead from the start, the first Inzell ostrich had taken the lead before the first bend after which there was no looking back. Inzell completed the game in 2 minutes 46 seconds followed by Schongau in 2 minutes 57 seconds and were awarded another 2pts. Inzell were now leading by 20-0 with just the final game remaining which carried double points.


Game 10 - The Guide Leader

The tenth and final game - ‘The Guide Leader’ - featured five competitors from each team and was played over 4 laps of a 100m course. The lead competitor was wearing roller-skates and facing forward. He was attached by rope to his four team-mates, who were sitting on chairs on castors behind him and facing backwards. On the whistle, whilst the standing competitor skated forward and pulled the chairs, his team-mates pushed backwards with their feet to assist him. At the end of each 100m run, the teams had to negotiate a podium, whilst remaining seated in the chairs and then race back to the start. This had to then be repeated and the first team to cross the finish line would be declared the winners. As was the case in the previous game, Schongau took an early lead but suffered a mishap after the first 100m at the turnaround point, whereby two of their competitors were unseated and had to stop and reposition themselves. This allowed the Inzell team to take the lead and as in the previous game, there was no looking back and easily won the game in 1 minute 52 seconds followed by Schongau in 2 minutes 5 seconds. With the final 4pts of the competition awarded to the team, Inzell had scored a maximum score and had beaten their rivals by an incredible 24-0. They had also written themselves into the Jeux Sans Frontières history books as the only team ever to achieve this feat in any of its related programmes.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

Both of the referees - Gennaro Olivieri and Guido Pancaldi - from the International series were amongst those assisting Kurt Hauser to officiate this year.

Additional Information

This heat opened to glorious warm spring sunshine and, in true West German style, with a marching band leading the teams into the arena. Not to be outdone, presenter Camillo Felgen entered the arena on a petrol-driven go-kart and after stopping the kart, got out, and in his own calm inimitable style, addressed the crowd with a simple “Guten Tag, Sie die Zuschauer” (Good Afternoon, to you the audience)!

A rare moment of West German broadcasting occurred during Camillo Felgen’s presentation of the second game. Whilst addressing the television audience, a camera crew wheeled another camera onto the track into full view of the viewers. Realising their mistake that cameras should not be seen by those at home, they quickly backtracked removing the camera from view. A classic Spiel Ohne Grenzen moment!

There were two interesting points to note from the third game - ‘Downhill Skiing’. Firstly, presenter Camillo Felgen was wearing normal shoes and could be seen sliding along the ice without fear of accident, something that he would repeat throughout the programme. Secondly, when the individual totals of each run were conveyed to him by referee Gennaro Olivieri, he personally wrote them on the mini-scoreboard and totalled them himself! Although this second point may appear unusual, there had been a similar occurrence on the third game of the International Final held in Kohlscheid, West Germany in 1967, whereby he had done the exact same.

During the sixth and seventh games there was an intermission with a comedic slapstick display of figure skating by 24-year old Sepp Schönmetzler, who had held the title of West German figure skating champion in 1962 and 1965.

Before the eighth game began, presenter Camillo Felgen asked the Inzell team captain why he had chosen to play the Joker on this particular game. With the team having won every single game in the competition at this point, the response he received was something of an understatement when he replied “It is the game we think we have the best chance of winning”!

The ninth game featured brothers Günther and Jürgen Traube dressed in ostrich costumes playing for the home side of Inzell. The German word for ostrich is Vogelstrauß (Strauss Bird) and presenter Camillo Felgen joked that maybe the brothers should be call the Strauß Brüder rather than the Traube Brüder. This was met with laughter from the two siblings and the assembled audience.

Inzell became the first and only team in any domestic programme (West German or British) to achieve a maximum score by winning every single game. They also hold the record for the highest winning margin in a domestic programme of 24pts.

The neutral juries of bürgermeisters, which were present at the heats of the inaugural series of Spiel Ohne Grenzen in 1967, were no longer utilised from this year.

The winners of each of this year’s heats received a cheque for 1,800 Deutsche Mark (£190) to help with improving the facilities for children of the town. In the same vein, the losing teams did not go home empty handed, receiving a similar cheque for 1,200 Deutsche Mark (£126).

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 2

Event Staged: Saturday 4th May 1968
Venue: Der Pferderennhahn (The Racecourse),
Erbach im Odenwald, Hessen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 4th May 1968, 3.30-4.45pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Kurt Hauser, Helmut Konrad and Peter Treischel

Weather Conditions:
Sunny and Warm with Strong Winds

Theme: Filme, Bücher und Romane (Movies, Books and Novels)

Teams: Erbach im Odenwald v. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu

Team Members included:
Kaufbeuren im Allgäu -
Gert Brückner, Karl Buhr, Herbert Fischer, Albert Göttfrieds-Kaufman, Franz Heinlein, Isobel Kenser, Peter Keppel, Helmut Reise, Angelica Schretten-Brüner, Renata Schück, Harald Scheimer, Monika Vögel, Josef Weiß.

Games: The Chariot Race, The Palm Trees, Uschi and Suzie, The Egg Sweepers, The Firemen’s Water Cannon, The Angry Jurors, Catch As Catch Can, The Tram Ride, The Caterpillar Trail, The Ellipses, The Ellipses / Tug-o-War (Tie-Break).

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Tie
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
E 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 4 0
K 2 0 4 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 1
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
E 0 2 2 4 4 4 6 6 8 12 12
K 2 2 6 6 8 10 10 12 12 12 13

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 K • Kaufbeuren im Allgäu
 E Erbach im Odenwald

13
12

Kaufbeuren im Allgäu qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Zofingen, Switzerland:
staged on Wednesday 3rd July 1968

The Host Town

Erbach im Odenwald, Hessen

Erbach im Odenwald, with a population of around 14,000 inhabitants, is a town located in Mümling valley in the very south of the German state of Hessen.

 

An aerial view of the castle at Erbach

 

The town is known as the City of White Gold, due to the Deutsches Elfenbeinmuseum (German Ivory Museum) located there. In existence since 1966, it is unique in Europe as all its exhibits are exclusively made of ivory. The town’s centrepiece is the Castle of the Counts of Erbach-Erbach, which is located on the western side of the Marktplatz. Although originally built in the Middle Ages, the majority of the buildings standing today only date back to the 18th century. Since the noble house did not have the needed materials on hand, only the middle wing of the planned three-winged building was ever built. The façade is, to a great extent, built out of sheeting or wood and coloured to look like that of sandstone.

Two miles (3.4km) to the north of Erbach im Obenwald, is the neighbouring town of Michelstadt, which was to be involved in a foreseen merger in 2009. Erbach im Obenwald mayor Harald Buschmann and his Michelstadt counterpart, Reinhold Ruhr, had been able to convince both city councils in the summer of 2007 of their merger plan. The plan was approved by both councils but it would still have to go to a public vote. However in 2008, and after a close vote by both towns (Erbach im Obenwald 52.2% against, 47.8% for and Michelstadt 54.9% against, 45.1% in favour), these plans had to be scuppered, but it is hoped that a merger will be considered again in the near future. It should be noted that whilst there was a poor 53% turnout in Michelstadt, only 49.4% of the electorate turned out in Erbach im Obenwald!

The Venue

Der Pferderennhahn (The Racecourse)

The games at this heat were played on the racecourse of the Odenwald Racing Association which is still used for harness racing.

 

Sportspark, home of local team FC Erbach,
which is surrounded by the Odenwald Racecourse

 

The wooden spectator stand has been renovated to its original grandiose style and has a somewhat Ascot-character about it. Today, the racecourse is quite unique as it totally encompasses Sportspark, the home stadium of local teams FSV and FC Erbach, which was built on the central area of the track and which has a brand new artificial pitch. In addition to race meetings, the course is utilised for the annual Erbach Wiesenmarkt (meadow market) at the end of July each year, a festival which originally began as a livestock and farm market in the late 19th century. Today however, although retaining its ‘market’ tradition, the festival is more geared to a family-orientated event offering fairground rides, sideshows and pony rides.

The festival commences at 3pm on Friday with a parade and the traditional ‘tapping of the keg’, but it is not until 2pm on the first Saturday that it is officially opened in front of the castle, with a nine-gun salute. The event attracts over 500,000 people during its 10-day duration, ending with a spectacular firework display on the second Sunday. The 60,000ft² (5,574m²) market area houses over 200 exhibitors with around another 200 dealers in the surrounding streets. The products on sale range from toys, clothing, household goods, culinary delights, spices, garden furniture, garage doors and lawn mowers through to large agricultural equipment and swimming pools.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Chariot Race

The first game - ‘The Chariot Race’ - was based on the legendary chariot race from the 1959 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer epic Ben-Hur directed by Willam Wyler (1902-1981) and starring Charlton Heston (1923-2008), Stephen Boyd (1931-1977) and Jack Hawkins (1910-1973). The game was played individually and featured three competitors from each team suitably attired in safety helmet and goggles. On the track there was a BMW - Bayerische Motoren Werke (Bavarian Motor Works) motorcycle which was attached to a platform mounted on small wheels by two ropes. On the whistle, two members of the team had to jump on the platform and maintain their balance whilst their team-mate pulled the ‘chariot’ a total distance of ‘twice around the track plus 100m’. If either or both of the competitors lost their balance and tumbled from the platform, the motorcyclist had to return to the spot to pick them up before continuing. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu participated first and completed the course in 1 minute 11.5 seconds with keine beanstandung (no objections). Erbach im Obenwald participated next and, although it appeared that they were travelling at a faster pace, they finished the game in 1 minute 12.6 seconds. The visitors from Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were awarded the first 2pts of the programme and were leading 2-0 on the scoreboard.


Game 2 - The Palm Trees

The second game - ‘The Palm Trees’ - was inspired by the 1958 film adaptation of the Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) and Oscar Hammerstein II (1895-1960) musical South Pacific directed by Joshua Logan (1908-1988) and starring Rossano Brazzi (1916-1994) and Mitzi Gaynor. The game was played in unison and featured four competitors (two male and two female) from each team and four palm trees. On the whistle, the two barefoot male competitors had to climb two of the trees in order to start collecting a total of 20 black and 20 white coconuts (5 black and 5 white coconuts in each tree) which were hanging high in the branches. These had to be thrown down and then caught in baskets by the female competitors. However, each basket could only be used for one colour of coconut and this resulted in the competitors having to run back and forth between the trees in order to achieve this. Once all ten coconuts had been dispensed with, the male competitors descended the trees and then each climbed the second pair of trees and repeated the process. Any coconuts dropped, not caught in the baskets correctly or left hanging in the tree each incurred a 10-second penalty. The team completing the game in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. This game was very fast-paced and ended with both teams finishing equal in 2 minutes 11 seconds. However, the Erbach im Obenwald team had collect 20 black and 18 white coconuts and incurred a penalty of 20 seconds (a total time of 2 minutes 31 seconds), whilst Kaufbeuren im Allgäu collected 20 black and 19 white coconuts and incurred a penalty of 10 seconds (a total time of 2 minutes 21 seconds). Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were declared the winners and awarded the 2pts which brought the scores to 4-0 in their favour.


Game 3 - Uschi and Suzie

The third game - ‘Uschi and Suzie’ - was loosely based on the allegorical book Animal Farm written by Eric Arthur Blair (1905-1950), under his pen name of George Orwell, which was first published in 1945. The game was designed to be straightforward but during the latter stages it would prove to be a very funny and entertaining game for all those watching. It featured a small maze comprising gates and obstacles and two live pigs and before the game began, the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu team captain presented the Joker for play. On the whistle, whilst walking along the perimeter of the maze, the competitor had to direct the pig through the maze from one end to the other. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. Suzie (Kaufbeuren im Allgäu) was a five-month old pig weighing 72kgs (158lbs 11oz / 11st 4lbs) which had been in training for five weeks for the event, whilst Uschi (Erbach im Obenwald) weighed in at around 100kgs (220lbs 7oz / 15st 10lbs) and had been in training for eight weeks. The first pig to participate was Suzie and she completed the game in just 22 seconds. Uschi on the other hand was much slower and did not have the inclination of her rival. Despite all his efforts, the Erbach im Obenwald competitor could not prevent Uschi from doing her own thing and after completing the first obstacle she decided that she had done enough, turned around and walked back towards the start. Although the clock was stopped after 1 minute 23 seconds, the referees allowed the game to play out to 1 minute 45 seconds before blowing the whistle. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu had won their third successive game and with 4pts awarded on the Joker, they were now leading 8-0 on the scoreboard.


Game 4 - The Egg Sweepers

The fourth game - ‘The Egg Sweepers’ - featured two female competitors from each team at opposite ends of the course, armed with large landscape hay rakes and 100 tennis balls disguised as ‘eggs’. On the whistle, the competitors had to ‘sweep’ the eggs backwards to a holding pen 80m (262ft 5½ins) up the course. The game was made more difficult by the fact that the tennis balls were small enough to pass through the tines of the rake. Any balls that came off the course had to be picked up and replaced. The team sweeping all 100 eggs into the holding pen in the faster time would be declared the winners. A straightforward game saw the Erbach im Obenwald sweepers complete the course in 3 minutes 37 seconds. The team were awarded their first 2pts of the programme and had closed the deficit slightly with the scores on the scoreboard standing at 8-2 in the visitors’ favour.


Game 5 - The Firemen's Water Cannons

The fifth game - The Firemen’s Water Cannons’ - was to see the whole competition turned on its head with a controversial decision and a rescoring of a previous game. The game was played in two heats and featured two competitors from each team, a slalom course, a small German car with a cage attached to its roof and a fire tender. The idea of the game was for one of the competitors to drive the car around a slalom course whilst his team-mate on the roof, armed with a long pole, attempted to knock tins from high podiums. However, two competitors from the opposing side, standing on the roof of the fire tender aimed high-speed jets of water at the car to obscure the driver’s view, causing him to hit the slalom gates and podium supports. This might not have appeared too difficult except for the fact that the wiper blades had been removed from the car’s windscreen. As well as negotiating the course in forward and reverse gears, the driver also had to park the car into designated sections of the course. The competitor on top of the car could assist his team-mate by using his feet to bang on the side of the car to help him steer the car through the gates. A penalty of 10 seconds was incurred for each gate or podium knocked down or touched by the car. The time limit for the game was 2 minutes 30 seconds and the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu team participated first and completed the course in 2 minutes 30 seconds exactly. However, they had incurred two penalties and their final time was given as 2 minutes 50 seconds. The home team of Erbach im Obenwald participated next but the game was halted following a false start whereby the team had started 2 seconds before the whistle was blown. At the second attempt, the game got under way again, but the driver appeared to have some difficulties steering the car, and after 1 minute 57 seconds the driver got out of the car and declared that the car was faulty and refused to continue. The referees came forward and gave their verdict and stated that the teams had agreed beforehand that due to the amount of water entering the car (e.g. through the front grille, wheel arches etc.) that any problems encountered would be accepted as part of the game. This somewhat riled the home crowd and was greeted by klaxons and jeers. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were awarded 2pts and the scores moved to 10-2 in their favour.


Objection!

Assistant referee Helmut Konrad then stepped up and stated that the Erbach im Obenwald team captain had lodged a complaint regarding the second game - ‘The Palm Trees’ - claiming that the opposition had failed to abide by the rules regarding the manner in which the teams collected the coconuts. Reading directly from the rules of the game, he stated that the protest had been upheld and the result of the game would be reversed. This resulted in the visiting team being deducted 2pts whilst the home side were awarded 2pts. The scoreboard operators frantically removed the scores and replaced them with the new amended scores of Kaufbeuren im Allgäu 8, Erbach im Obenwald 4.


Game 6 - The Angry Jurors

The sixth game - ‘The Angry Jurors’ - was based on the 1957 film adaptation of 12 Angry Men directed by Sidney Lumet (1924-2011) and starring Henry Fonda (1905-1982), Lee J. Cobb (1911-1976) and Martin Balsam (1919-1996) amongst others. The film tells the story of a jury of twelve men who are to deliberate the guilt or acquittal convinced of a defendant on the basis of reasonable doubt. As the film continues, one of the jurors is unconvinced of the defendant’s guilt and gradually breaks down the remaining jurors to get a ’not guilty’ decision. The game featured a semi-circular wall with 11 caricature jury members’ heads hinged to the top and on the whistle, a competitor from each team (the twelfth juror) armed with a bratpfanner (frying-pan or skillet) and a ball on an elasticated rope had to knock down (or convince) as many of the jurors to change their vote within the time limit of 1 minute 30 seconds. A simple and straightforward game ended with Erbach im Obenwald displacing 5 heads and Kaufbeuren im Allgäu displacing 9 heads. The 2pts were awarded to the visiting team and they were now leading 10-4 on the scoreboard.


Game 7 - Catch As Catch Can

The seventh game - ‘Catch As Catch Can’ - was played on a small football pitch by three competitors from each team. The game had a total of four minutes duration (2 minutes each half) with the competitors dressed in large round polystyrene barrels strapped over their shoulders. Competitors were permitted to kick the ball or pick it up and throw it and the team scoring the greater number of goals would be declared the winners. The first goal was scored by the home team after just 25 seconds, but the crowd had to wait another 1 minute 38 seconds before they scored a second goal just after 3 minutes of play. Despite a penalty being awarded to the visitors 20 seconds before the end (which incidentally, was saved by the goalkeeper), nothing could stop Erbach im Obenwald from winning the game and being awarded the 2pts. The scoreboard now showed that Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were leading by 10-6.


Game 8 - The Tram Ride

The eighth game - ‘The Tram Ride’ - was inspired by the 1951 film adaptation of the Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) play A Streetcar Named Desire which starred Marlon Brando (1924-2004), Vivien Leigh (1913-1967), Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Karl Malden (1912-2009). The game featured two horses (Opa for Erbach im Obenwald and Oma for Kaufbeuren im Allgäu) pulling two trams along a course to pick up five holiday makers with their luggage. The idea of the game was for the tram driver to set off and stop at various points to pick up a total of five holidaymakers and their luggage. The first competitor had to load his luggage onto the tram by himself whilst subsequent competitors could be assisted by team-mates already on board. Once all five competitors and luggage were on board, there was a short gallop to cross the finish line. In total the teams had to pick up 49 items comprising 30 suitcases, 9 medium-sized boxes, 5 large chests, 3 round hat boxes and 2 large corn sacks. There were penalties incurred of 10 seconds for items not collected and if the competitors were not on the tram when it set off between stops. The team completing the game in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. Before the game started the Erbach im Obenwald team captain presented the Joker for play and it was a very closely run race. As the results were announced it was not to be the success story that the home crowd had hoped for. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu crossed the finish line in 2 minutes 25 seconds and with one penalty registered against the team, their overall time was 2 minutes 35 seconds. Erbach im Obenwald crossed the finish line in 2 minutes 34 seconds and also had one penalty registered against them, bringing their overall time to 2 minutes 44 seconds. The visiting team were awarded another 2pts and, after nullifying the Erbach im Obenwald Joker, Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were leading 12-6 on the scoreboard. Despite trailing by 6pts, there was still a possibility that the Erbach im Obenwald team could win the competition, but first they had to secure victory on the next two games, with the second of the two games carrying double points.


Game 9 - The Caterpillar Trail

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘The Caterpillar Trail’ - was played individually over two rounds and featured five competitors from each team wearing pointed wizard hats and dressed in a large segmented caterpillar costume. On the whistle, the caterpillar had to pass over a box containing 30 water-filled balloons and burst them with its 10 feet. After leaving the box it had to follow a designated trail around 13 ski poles and underneath 6 high hurdles. The final obstacle was to ascend a ramp to reach a long trampoline which had 20 water-filled balloons hanging above it. The competitors had to bounce along on the trampoline bursting the balloons with the pins attached to the tips of their hats. Any balloons not burst would each incur a penalty of 5 seconds. The team completing the game in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. Erbach im Obenwald participated first and, with knowledge that they had to win this game to set up an exciting and crucial final game, they set off at a cracking pace and especially across the trampoline. Although the team completed the course in 1 minute 38 seconds they had failed to burst two of the balloons above the trampoline and with the 10 seconds penalty (2 x 5) added, their overall score was increased to 1 minute 48 seconds. The Kaufbeuren im Allgäu team participated next and although they reached the trampoline in a faster time, the competitors were not so adept in bursting the balloons. This resulted in the team losing vital seconds and finished the game in 1 minute 50 seconds, already 2 seconds slower than their competitor’s overall time. With an additional 5 seconds added for failing to burst one of the balloons above the trampoline, their overall time taken was 1 minute 55 seconds. The 2pts were awarded to Erbach im Obenwald and the scoreboard now read 12-8 in the visitors’ favour. Trailing now by just 4pts, the home team still had a chance to tie the contest, with the final game carrying double points.


Game 10 - The Ellipses

The tenth and final game - ‘The Ellipses’ - was a straight race up a 70m (229ft 8ins) course by two waiters from each team. At one end of the course was a giant ellipse-shaped wheel which had to be transported down a course comprising two seesaws by a competitor running inside. In order that the wheel stayed on a straight course, the competitors were permitted to step out of the wheel to redirect it without any penalty. At the end of the course, the competitors had to pick up a tray of glasses from a high podium and transport them back to the start in the same manner as the outward journey. After the first competitor had crossed the finish line and placed the tray on another podium, the whole process was repeated by a team-mate. The team completing both return journeys in the faster time would be declared the winners. On the whistle, the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu waiter set off at a cracking pace but suffered a mishap on the second seesaw and failed to traverse it correctly and was sent back to repeat it. This allowed the Erbach im Obenwald waiter to sneak ahead to a rapturous roar of support and then maintain the lead throughout the game, finishing in a time of 2 minutes 14 seconds. Although Erbach im Obenwald had crossed the finish line, they had done so on their opponent’s side of the course. Referee Kurt Hauser could be seen indicating to the team that they had to get back in the wheel and finish the course on the correct side. During the confusion, the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu waiter approached the finish line urged on by his team-mates, who had now realised that they could still win the game, and finished in 2 minutes 33 seconds. The team started celebrating but in the background there appeared to be some deliberation by the three referees. The crowd waited with bated breath for almost 1 minute 30 seconds for Kurt Hauser’s announcement. When it finally came, the crowd were not disappointed and the 4pts were awarded to the home team and the scores stood level at 12-12.


Tie-Break!

The competition went into a tie break and it was decided that there would be a re-run of the final game over one return journey and without the competitors having to transport the tray of glasses. The Kaufbeuren im Allgäu waiter got off to the better start and reached the turnaround point first, overshooting it by a few metres. The Erbach im Obenwald waiter on the other hand began to decrease his speed towards the approach in order to stop just over the line. This allowed the gap between the two teams to be narrowed and they started neck and neck for the return journey. Halfway up the course, the visiting team suffered a setback when the wheel overshot one of the see-saws and rolled into the path of the home side. Both teams had now come to a complete stop and although both competitors attempted to reposition their wheels and continue on, referee Kurt Hauser stopped the game and announced that the game was null and void. This was met with a barrage of boos and jeers by the assembled audience.

To decide the outcome of the programme, the production team produced a long rope and it was obvious that a tug-o-war was going to be used to settle the contest. There was then a very long delay whilst the stagehands chalked lines on the path on which the contest was to take place and the teams decided which four competitors would participate in this 2 against 2 contest. After 5 minutes 15 seconds of waiting, the tug-o-war finally started and, although all the competitors put up a stellar performance, it ended after 56 seconds when the home competitors fell to the floor and allowed the rope to slip through their hands. Kaufbeuren im Allgäu were awarded 1pt which was unusual, as the previous tied match in 1967 had ended with an additional 2pts being awarded to the winning team, to bring the contest to a close with the scores at 13-12 in their favour.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

At the end of the second game - ‘The Palm Trees’ - viewers were ‘treated’ to another refereeing blunder by Kurt Hauser (something that he had been renowned for since 1965) when he mistakenly declared Erbach im Obenwald as the winners of the game, despite the fact that the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu team were celebrating right behind him as he revealed the times achieved by the teams. The home crowd went wild with this news setting of firecrackers and sounding klaxons. However, presenter Camillo Felgen had to calm them down and ask Hauser to repeat the result following intervention by assistant referee Peter Treischel and, after repeating the times and realising his error, he declared the winners as Kaufbeuren im Allgäu!

Additional Information

As was the case with many of the West German Domestic programmes, this one opened to the pomp and circumstance of a military band with the teams being led into the arena on agricultural vehicles behind dignitaries, presenters and referees on mini-tractors.

There was an intermission between the fifth and sixth games with a display by the Big Band of the 12th Panzer Division of Würzburg. The 12th Panzer Division was a military division of the Bundeswehr (Federal Defence). The Divisional Headquarters had been located in Veitshöchheim, a municipality of Würzburg since 1965. The division was stationed in parts of Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg and Rhineland-Palatinate but was finally disbanded in 1994.

At the end of the eighth game following victory, there was almost a catastrophe when the driver of the Kaufbeuren im Allgäu tram attempted to turn too fast at the end of the course and caused the tram to overturn almost bringing its horse Oma with it. A stagehand quickly ran in to calm the frightened horse before it stampeded and caused injury to itself or anybody.

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 3

Event Staged: Saturday 11th May 1968
Venue: Freibad (Open-Air Swimming Pool),
Rüsselsheim am Main, Hessen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 11th May 1968, 4.00-5.15pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Kurt Hauser, Peter Hochrath and Peter Treischel

Weather Conditions:
Sunny and Warm with a Light Breeze

Theme: Spiele im Waßer (Games in the Water)

Teams: Homburg im Saarland v. Rüsselsheim am Main

Team Members included:
Homburg im Saarland -
Dieter Becker, Hans Grup, Karl-Heinz Jung, Karl-Ludwig Kiensch, Alphonse Schindler;
Rüsselsheim am Main - Karl Michaels.

Games: Podium Basketball, Island Hopping, Angling for Fish, The Swans and the Geese, The Ship’s Figurehead, The Floating Bridge, The Newly-Weds, The Astronauts, The Trapeze Artiste, The Giant Skis.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
H 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 4 0 4
R 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 0
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
H 0 2 4 6 8 8 8 12 12 16
R 2 2 2 2 2 4 6 6 8 8

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 H • Homburg im Saarland
 R Rüsselsheim am Main

16
8

Homburg im Saarland qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Verviers, Belgium:
staged on Wednesday 17th July 1968

The Host Town

Rüsselsheim am Main, Hessen

Rüsselsheim am Main is a city of around 61,000 inhabitants located in the south-west of the state of Hessen. Originally emerging from a settlement of the Count of Katzenelnbogen (literally translated as cat’s elbow), the city has had its name changed several times over the centuries, being called Rucilesheim, Ruzelnsheim, Ruselheim before acquiring its current name in 1840.

 

An aerial view of Rüsselsheim am Main's imposing Rathaus (Town Hall)

 

The city’s coat of arms is a silver ‘Doppelhaken’ (double hook) and two silver stars on a blue background. Also known as a ‘wolfsangel’ (wolf hook), it is not known whether it was actually used to kill wolves. There is some controversy over the symbol as it is actually forbidden to use it in Germany on the grounds that it was used in the past to represent certain right-wing extremist groups, which are also now banned. Civic coats of arms, which have traditionally used the symbol, are exempt from the ban.

The area was known for its white Riesling wine which was first cultivated around 1435 by Count John IV of Katzenelnbogen after buying the vines for 22 schillings. In the following years however, Riesling vineyards began to appear all along the valleys of the Rhine and the Mosel, which badly damaged the profitability of the vineyards. Rüsselsheim am Main's comeback in the history of the wine took place in 18th and 19th century, when famous wine-growing estates in the Rheingauer Weinbauverband EV (Rhinegau Winegrowers’ Association) recultivated their vineyards with vines of the Rüsselsheim and Flörsheim Area . After the First World War viticulture disappeared in Rüsselsheim am Main. In 1980, the mayor of Rüsselsheim am Main, Dr. Storsberg, initiated a memory vineyard near the castle celebrating 550 Years of Riesling. This vineyard still exists today.

One of the most impressive building in the city is the Rathaus (Town Hall) located at 4 Market Square. The distinct white clad building houses the headquarters of the city’s administration, as well as the offices of the mayor and other department heads.The city is also home to the headquarters of car manufacturer, Opel AG, founded in 1862 by Adam Opel (1837-95), and the European Centre of Korean car manufacturer Hyundai.

The Venue

Freibad (Open-Air Swimming Pool)

The games at this heat were played in the open-air swimming pool located in the centre of the city.

 

The Open Air Swimming Pool at Rüsselsheim am Main

 

Unfortunately not much is known about the complex except that it had three pools at the time (one indoor and two outdoor) with the main outdoor pool having a length of 50m (164ft) and a water temperature of 24°C (75°F) and also a non-swimmer pool adjacent to it. Today the facility has been upgraded and also offers a waterfall shower, a water mushroom, a wide slide, a whirlpool and a parent and child area with a play field as well as a water slide. The indoor 50m swimming pool has a water temperature of 30°C (86°F) and also a non-swimmer pool with a length of 25m (82ft) with a water temperature of 28°C (82°F). There is also a parent and child area with toys, a flow channel, massage jets, a sauna, a big water slide, massage facilities, a whirlpool and an area offering some classic German gastronomy.

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - Podium Basketball

The first game - ‘Podium Basketball’ - featured three competitors at the poolside aboard a circular hollow wooden podium with netting around its circumference and an elongated basketball frame attached to it. On the whistle, two of the competitors had to row the podium into the middle of the pool in order to collect balls which were being tossed into the water by stagehands, whilst the third competitor was used as a balance. When the team reached a ball, they dipped the front end of the podium (with the frame) into the water and positioned it under the ball and then all three leaned backwards forcing the front end to rise and for the ball to run down into the netted podium. The team collecting the greater number of balls within the two minutes duration would be declared the winners. Rüsselsheim am Main participated first and secured 8 balls in the time permitted whilst the visitors of Homburg im Saarland could only manage to collect 6 balls. The first points of the programme were awarded to Rüsselsheim am Main and they were leading by 2-0.


Game 2 - Island Hopping

The second game - ‘Island Hopping’ - featured two competitors from each team and was to be a very quickly-executed game, lasting just 31 seconds. In the pool there were two rows of 10 large discs (islands) joined together by small wooden planks, with the fourth and fifth discs each marked with a large cross. On the whistle, the first competitor from each team jumped into the pool to reach the first disc and then climb aboard. Once on the disc, he had to run along the row of discs to reach the end. Once he had achieved this, he turned around and his team-mate entered the water at the other end to repeat the process. In the meantime, the first competitor made his way back over the discs, but he could not go any further than the discs marked with the cross. At this point, he had to wait for his team mate to pass before he could continue and the method of passing was of their own choosing. Once passed, the second competitor completed this run to the 10th disc whilst his team-mate made his way back to the start. Once the second competitor had reached the end, he turned around and it was a straight run back to the start. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. The visiting team made the game look very easy and their competitor opted for lying facedown on the marked disc so that his team-mate could pass by easily. Rüsselsheim am Main however, were delayed somewhat when their second competitor fell into the water after reaching the fourth disc and having to remount it before they could continue. This delay allowed the visiting team to complete the game just as the Rüsselsheim am Main competitors passed each other, opting to jump from one marked podium to the other in opposite directions at the same time. Homburg im Saarland finished the game in 31 seconds with Rüsselsheim am Main completing the game in 45 seconds, despite referee Kurt ‘Herr Blunder’ Hauser declaring their time as 35 seconds. The visitors were awarded the 2pts and had brought the scores level at 2-2.


Game 3 - Angling for Fish

The third game - ‘Angling for Fish’ - was played over a duration of two minutes and featured three competitors armed with fishing rods with magnetised hooks sitting on a large swing above the pool. In the pool below was a floating frame which contained 14 large fish with magnetised patches on their heads. On the whistle, the three competitors had to angle for the fish and once caught and removed from the water, had to throw them into another floating frame behind them. However, two opposition team members were pulling the frame from side-to-side to hinder them. Homburg im Saarland participated first and their competitors caught 8 fish. Rüsselsheim am Main participated next and their competitors were very unfortunate after 1 minute 45 seconds when the eighth fish to be caught, fell from the magnet. The home team ended with a score of 7 fish and the game was awarded to Homburg im Saarland. With their second consecutive victory the visiting team were now leading on the scoreboard 4-2.


Game 4 - The Swans and the Geese

The fourth game - ‘The Swans and the Geese’ - featured four competitors from each team wearing large polystyrene bird costumes complete with divers’ flippers on their feet. Homburg im Saarland were attired as white swans and Rüsselsheim am Main as black geese. On the whistle, the teams had to waddle down a set of steps and then around a concourse in order to reach the smaller of the two outside pools. After entering the pool, the teams had to zigzag their way through three high hurdles. Each hurdle had 5 balloons hanging from it and these had to be burst by pins attached to the birds’ beaks. After reaching the end of the pool, the teams made their return journey in the same manner, bursting any balloons missed on the outward journey. If the hurdles were knocked down, the teams had to replace them in their original position before continuing. A straightforward game saw the Homburg im Saarland team completed the game first in 1 minute 59 seconds and were awarded the 2pts. They were now leading on the scoreboard 6-2.


Game 5 - The Ship's Figurehead

The fifth game - ‘The Ship’s Figurehead’ - was played in unison by three competitors from each team over four minutes duration and featured two ship’s bows with the figureheads removed. On the whistle, each of the competitors armed with a piece of the figurehead dropped it into the pool below and then descended by a rope into the water. The pieces then had to be retrieved and a rope ladder utilised to reach a small platform under the prow where the figurehead would be placed. The pieces then had to be slotted into place and held there with strips of Velcro which were attached to the inner side of each piece. The competitors then climbed a smaller ladder to reach their starting point again. This process was then repeated until all 10 pieces (4 torso, 2 face and 2 arm pieces) of the figurehead were in the correct position and the team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. Before the game began, the Rüsselsheim am Main team captain presented the team’s Joker for play and it appeared that the home team had the game sewn up until the first of the arms, which had not been secured correctly, fell back into the water. This mishap allowed the visitors to take the lead and finish the game in 3 minutes 1 second followed by Rüsselsheim am Main in 3 minutes 21 seconds. With their fourth consecutive victory, and having nullified the home team’s Joker, Homburg im Saarland were awarded 2pts and were now steaming ahead, leading 8-2 on the scoreboard.


Game 6 - The Floating Bridge

The sixth game - ‘The Floating Bridge’ - was a straightforward game played in unison over three minutes duration and featured large rubber carpets and a shoal of 20 fish. On the whistle, the two competitors from each team entered the pool and had to unfurl their carpet as they made their way to the other side. They then had to attach the carpet to a large taut net which contained a shoal of fish. Once completed each competitor collected a fish and transported it back to the start by means of the bridge. The game was then repeated with the competitors utilising the carpet in both directions. The team with the greater number of fish collected would be declared the winners. The home team were more adept than their visitors and finished the game with 8 fish whilst their opponents collected 6 fish. The 2pts were awarded to Rüsselsheim am Main and the scoreboard was showing 8-4 in Homburg im Saarland’s favour.


Game 7 - The Newly-Weds

The seventh game - ‘The Newly-Weds’ - was played in unison and featured a bride and groom in full morning wear from each team. On the whistle, the groom had to remove his top hat and hand it to a stagehand. He then dived into the pool and swam 50m to the other end to meet his bride. Once he arrived, three members of this team placed a polystyrene open grand piano in the water and the bride stepped onto it. The groom then had to load up the piano with 20 items of furniture - 6 paintings, 4 armchairs, a standard lamp, a grandfather clock, a crib, 3 large chests, an ottoman, a large straw basket and a garden table and chair - which would be needed for their new home. Once everything was on board, the groom pushed the piano away from the poolside and jumped into the pool. He then had to transport it all to the other end, climb out of the pool, and replace his top hat to finish the game. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. The Rüsselsheim am Main team took full command of the game from the start and did not look back and despite the fact that their bride fell off the piano into the pool, they completed the game in 4 minutes 12 seconds. A second consecutive 2pts were awarded to the home team and the scoreboard showed that whilst the deficit was being reduced, Homburg im Saarland were still leading 8-6.


Game 8 - The Astronauts

The eighth game - ‘The Astronauts’ - was played in unison by a competitor from each team armed with a paddle and supposedly dressed as an astronaut and featured a unique piece of equipment. The astronaut was standing at the poolside and in the water in front of him was a classic saucer-shaped alien spacecraft. On the top of the craft was a small circular podium on castors which turned independently. On the whistle, the astronauts had to step onto the podium and then paddle their way down the length of the pool and then, after circumnavigating a pole, return to the start in the same manner. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. Before the game began, the Homburg im Saarland team captain presented the team’s Joker for play. The competitors were given the signal to start and the Homburg im Saarland competitor took control of the game and reached the turnaround point a few metres ahead of his rival. However, the momentum used to reach this point had caused him to overshoot the course and this allowed the Rüsselsheim am Main competitor to make up the lost ground and start ahead of his rival for the return journey. The first 30m (98ft 6ins) of this leg saw a neck and neck race and it appeared that the home team would nullify the visitors’ Joker, but a final burst of speed by the Homburg im Saarland competitor saw them finish the game in 1 minute 11 seconds followed by Rüsselsheim am Main in 1 minute 12 seconds. There was then a long 4-minute wait for the official announcement whilst the three referees deliberated amongst themselves. Although the result was confirmed, referee Kurt Hauser stated that the times were 1 minute 13 seconds and 1 minute 14 seconds, respectively. Homburg im Saarland had won their Joker game and were awarded 4pts. They were now leading 12-6 on the scoreboard and although the deficit was now 6pts, there was still a chance for Rüsselsheim am Main to tie the contest, as there were still 6pts up for grabs on the final two games.


Game 9 - The Trapeze Artiste

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘The Trapeze Artiste’ - was played individually by each team over two minutes duration and featured a competitor on a trapeze swing hanging upside-down by his knees. In front of him in the pool was a team-mate with a number of footballs, whilst behind him was a circular goal. After being pulled up by a rope to a 90° angle position by a stagehand, he released himself and the whistle was blown. On the forward swing the competitor had to catch a football thrown by his team-mate and on the backward swing he had to attempt to score a goal. If the momentum of the swing decreased, the competitor could return to the classic swing position to achieve more speed, before returning to his playing position and continuing. Homburg im Saarland participated first and scored a total of 13 goals, but the Rüsselsheim am Main player was determined to close the deficit on the scoreboard and finished the game with 18 goals. The home team were awarded 2pts and the scores were now 12-8 in Homburg im Saarland’s favour and the contest would now be decided (or tied) on the final game which carried 4pts to the winners.


Game 10 - The Giant Skis

The tenth and final game - ‘The Giant Skis’ - featured five competitors from each team standing in a giant set of floating paddle skis which were designed to allow water to penetrate inside the floats and make the teams’ task more demanding. On the whistle, the teams were permitted to push themselves away from the poolside and then it was a simple case of ‘ walking on water’ up the 20m course to the finish line. Although it was a closely-fought race, the Homburg im Saarland quintet were ahead throughout and finished the game in 2 mins 2 seconds followed by the Rüsselsheim am Main team in 2 minutes 40 seconds. The 4pts were awarded to the visiting team and they had won the contest by 16-8.

Additional Information

There was an intermission between the fifth and sixth games to provide the crowd with some non-competitive entertainment. Hans Römer und die Waßer Clowns (Hans Römer and the Water Clowns) provided some slapstick fun from the diving boards and poolside accompanied by the Jerry Herman penned theme music to the 20th Century Fox film Hello Dolly which was directed by Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and starred Barbra Streisand and Walther Matthau (1920-2000). The latter part of the display saw members of the troupe re-enacting a supposed scene from the cult British TV series The Avengers starring Patrick Macnee and Diana Rigg. Römer, dressed as John Steed, the lead character of series, is seen shooting members of his team and consequently falling into the pool including one of them disguised as a cameraman. This part of the show was accompanied by the series theme music, written by Laurie Johnson.

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 4

Event Staged: Saturday 18th May 1968
Venue: Sportübungsplatz (Sports Training Ground),
Troisdorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 18th May 1968, 3.45-5.00pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Helmut Konrad and Guido Pancaldi

Weather Conditions:
Sunny with a Strong Breeze

Theme: Menschliche Stärke (Human Strength)

Teams: Landau in der Pfalz v. Troisdorf

Team Members included:
Landau in der Pfalz -
Karl Bocker (Team Captain & Physician), Heinz Wensal (Team Trainer), Wolfgang Burgmeier, Federic Destier, Margarita Kleiner, Günther Rümmel, Paul Westermann, Wolfgang Zunick;
Troisdorf - Hr. Heimuß (Team Captain), Werner Ming (Co-Team Trainer), Hans Schicht (Co-Team Trainer).

Games: The Ramming Carts, Around the Clock, The Giant Snails’ Race, The Foot Tablet, A String of Pearls, On Your Head, The Giant Jellyfish, The Stilt Walkers, The Australian Kangaroos, The Wheeled Centipedes.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
L 0 1 4 2 0 2 0 2 0 4
T 2 1 0 0 4 0 2 0 2 0
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
L 0 1 5 7 7 9 9 11 11 15
T 2 3 3 3 7 7 9 9 11 11

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 L • Landau in der Pfalz
 T Troisdorf

15
11

Landau in der Pfalz qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Vigevano, Italy:
staged on Wednesday 31st July 1968

The Host Town

Troisdorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Troisdorf is a city of around 77,000 inhabitants, is located 14 miles (22km) south of Köln and 8½ miles (13 km) north-east of the former West German capital city of Bonn. Industrialisation began in the early 19th century with the construction of an alum works in Spich in 1815, the Claren bell foundry in Sieglar in 1816 and the iron works on the banks of the River Sieg in 1825. This was followed in 1887 by the construction of a detonator and explosives factory in Troisdorf, which subsequently became Dynamit-Nobel AG.

 

The museum of Burg Wissem, illuminated at night

 

The town, which at the time comprised just seven districts, was elevated to city status in 1952 and, following the reorganisation of local government boundaries on 1st August 1969, it was merged with the township of Sieglar and the villages of Altenrath and Friedrich-Wilhelms-Hütte. Present-day Troisdorf comprises 12 distinct districts - Altenrath, Bergheim, Eschmar, Friedrich-Wilhelms-Hütte, Kriegsdorf, Müllekoven, Oberlar, Rotter See, Sieglar, Spich, West and Troisdorf itself. The city council passed a resolution in 1999 to add the districts of Rotter See and West.

At the end of World War II, the residents of Altenrath were able to move back to the town, having been forced to make way for an expansion of the German army's drill ground in 1938.

The town has a population of predominantly Christian belief, consisting of Roman Catholics, Protestants and Baptists, along with an influx of migrants of Islamic, Orthodox Christian and Jewish faiths. Troisdorf is one of the few cities in Germany with a mosque complete with an actual minaret built for the local Islamic community. It is home to about 9,600 foreign nationals, the two most numerous foreign national groups being Turks and Greeks. On 4th June 1972, the first advisory council for foreign citizens in Germany was founded in the town. In the years following the Peaceful Revolution and German reunification of 1989/1990, many migrants from Russia and other East European countries have settled here.

The town’s landmark is Burg Wissem which is set amidst beautiful scenery. The historic castle is a popular destination for the whole family and dates from 1474 when it was originally part of a nobleman’s estate. It was a castle complex and fortification enclosed by a moat and the ancestral seat of the masters of Troisdorf (Truhtesdorf). Today it is home to three museums.

The Venue

Sportübungsplatz (Sports Training Ground)

The games at this heat were played on the sports ground used for training by local football club SSV (Spiel und Sportverien) 1905 Troisdorf which is located adjacent to their stadium and, at the end of the event, it would be regarded as one of the true classic Spiel Ohne Grenzen programmes.

 

The Sports Training Ground as seen in Spiel Ohne Grenzen

 

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Ramming Cars

The first game - ‘The Ramming Carts’ - featured three competitors from each team and a large eight-wheeled vehicle which was not only unusual in design but also had a unique method of propulsion. Sitting on the four axles of the vehicle was a large board and three-quarters of the along its length, above the third axle, was a 2m (6ft 6½ins) wooden wall with some large prongs on top. On the whistle, the teams had three minutes to ‘walk’ the vehicle down the 80m (262ft 5½ins) course simply by utilising potential energy. The method of achieving this was for the three competitors to walk along the board towards the wall at a slow pace and then run back to the rear of the vehicle. The direction of their backward travel then being transferred into the vehicle below resulting in the vehicle moving forward. This had to be repeated throughout the game. As the team moved down the course they had to pass under two ‘tunnels’ of 10 water-filled balloons which had to be burst by the prongs on top of the wall. Any balloons not burst would incur a penalty of 5 seconds each. The team completing the course in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. Although this was a fairly straightforward game, there was a certain magic to its design and was a joy to watch. Troisdorf finished the course in 2 minutes 37 seconds but had failed to burst 14 of the balloons. However, the Landau in der Pfalz team failed to cross the line within the time allowed and were not only given a time of 0:00, and therefore the number of balloons was not taken into consideration. The home team awarded the first 2pts of the contest and they were leading on the scoreboard 2-0.


Game 2 - Around the Clock

The second game - ‘Around the Clock’ - ended almost as soon as it had begun, after equipment failure deemed the game to be declared null and void. The game was played in unison and featured two competitors from each team on a training bike which had the pedals connected to a giant clock showing the time of 1200hrs. On the whistle, the two competitors had to pedal the bicycle in order to turn the minute hand of the clock, in theory moving the time forward, and the team turning the hands the greater distance (i.e. showing the latter time) within the two minutes duration would be declared the winners. The game began and within 24 seconds of the start, the Troisdorf team suffered a malfunction with the pedal mechanism on their bicycle. The game was stopped, in order for the referees to examine the problem, and ultimately declared null and void. Both teams were awarded 1pt each, much to the disgust of the assembled crowd, and the scoreboard was updated to show Troisdorf leading 3-1.


Game 3 - The Giant Snails' Race

The third game - ‘The Giant Snails’ Race’ - was played in unison and witnessed the Joker of Landau in der Pfalz being presented for play. It featured a competitor from each team lying face down in a giant snail costume which was mounted on wheels. On the whistle, the competitors had to move down a zigzagging course by digging small ski poles into the ground, pulling themselves forward and then repeating the process. During the execution of the game, they also had to burst 24 balloons laid out on either side of the course and, after crossing the finish line, travel a further 3m (9ft 10½ins) forward in order to burst a final balloon. Any balloons not burst would incur a penalty of 5 seconds and the team completing the course in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. Landau in der Pfalz completed the course in 58 seconds and Troisdorf in 1 minute 4 seconds and with both teams having burst all their balloons, there were no penalties to be added. The visiting team were victorious on their Joker game and were awarded 4pts. The scoreboard was updated and showed that Landau in der Pfalz were leading for the first time by 5-3.


Game 4 - The Foot Tablet

The fourth game - ‘The Foot Tablet’ - was played in unison and featured a competitor from each team standing in the middle of a large circular wooden tablet with twelve small pot plants arranged around its circumference. The tablet was designed in a way that one foot was in a boot attached to the tablet whilst the other could walk freely. On the whistle, the competitors had to move the tablet forward by sliding it with the booted foot and then move the unfettered foot one pace forward and then repeating the process. Any plants displaced during the game would incur a penalty of 10 seconds each. The team completing the game in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. The game began with the Troisdorf competitor picking up a steady rhythm and with it he edged further ahead throughout the game and crossed the finish line in 1 minute 39 seconds. The visiting competitor moved at a slower pace and crossed the line in exactly 2 minutes. However, the home competitor in his haste lost 6 pots along the way and incurred 60 seconds in penalties, giving Troisdorf an overall time of 2 minutes 39 seconds. Landau in the Pfalz on the other hand, had played the game more tactfully and, although having a slower time, did not incur any penalties. Landau in der Pfalz were awarded the 2pts and were now leading on the scoreboard 7-3.


Game 5 - A String of Pearls

The fifth game - ‘A String of Pearls’ - had a duration of three minutes, featured three competitors from each team and saw the home team of Troisdorf presenting their Joker for play. At one end of the course was a scaled down ski slope, at the top of which were hanging two sets of 15 large alternate coloured polystyrene pearls (one set for each team) on ropes which had been knotted at the bottom, and a much sharper 60° degree ramp at the other end. Before the whistle was blown, the rope had to be untied at the bottom and held secure by one of the competitors in order that the pearls did not fall off. Once the game began, the first two competitors removed pearls and then handed the rope to their team-mate and then ran down the ski slope and then up the ramp to a similar rope and threaded the pearls on to it. The second competitor had to hold the rope whilst his team-mate ran back to the start to release the third competitor. He then ran with a pearl to the ramp to release the second competitor who then repeated the process. The team completing the string of pearls in the faster time would be declared the winners. The visiting team of Landau in der Pfalz participated first and completed the game without mishap in 2 minutes 12 seconds. The home team participated next and by the halfway mark they were 2 seconds faster than their rivals. The tension mounted as the clock ticked by and reached the 2 minute mark, but the team held their nerve and completed the game in 2 minutes 9 seconds and were awarded the 4pts, having played the Joker. With the scoreboard updated, the contest was all-square at 7-7.


Game 6 - On Your Head

The sixth game - ‘On Your Head’ - with three minutes duration, was simple in its format and featured 4 competitors playing basketball. However, the only difference from the normal rules of the sport was that the competitors had to keep the ball aloft by using their head. On the whistle, a competitor threw a ball into the air and attempted to head it into a basketball net. If successful, a team-mate located underneath the basket would then head it back into the air towards one of the other two competitors who, keeping it aloft at all times, had to transport it a short distance to another basketball net to score a goal. This process was repeated throughout the game. When a goal was scored, the ball descended a large net onto an incline leading to a holding pen which then displayed all the successful goals. The team scoring the greater number of goals would be declared the winners. The Landau in der Pfalz team participated first and were officially recorded as having scored 10 goals by referee Guido Pancaldi (see ‘Additional Information’ section below). The Troisdorf team were less adept in their heading skills and could only manage to score 3 goals. The visiting team were awarded the 2pts and were once again leading on the scoreboard 9-7.


Game 7 - The Giant Jellyfish

The seventh game - ‘The Giant Jellyfish’ - was played over four minutes duration and featured two very large jellyfish and four competitors from each team. On the whistle, the four competitors could pick up to a maximum of six buckets of water and place them on top of the flattened head of the jellyfish. The jellyfish then had to be lifted up by two of the competitors to allow the other two to crawl under and inside. Once inside, they maintained the height of the jellyfish whilst their team-mates joined them. The jellyfish was then transported down the course by following a white line marked out on the ground to reach a circle at the end. On completion of this section, the competitors had to get from under the jellyfish in the same manner, but in reverse, and empty the contents from the buckets (if any) into a rectangular Perspex container. The jellyfish were returned to the start in the same manner as the outward journey and the process repeated. The team collecting the greater amount of water would be declared the winners. A well costumed game from the ingenious mind of designer Willi Steinberg saw both teams suffer mishaps when raising and lowering their jellyfish with buckets of water falling to the ground. However at the end of the game, the total amounts of water collected were revealed and the teams were separated by just 1cm (½in) of water. Landau in der Pfalz had collected 54cms (21¼ins) of water whilst Troisdorf had collected 55cms 21¾ins) of water. As the home crowd went wild, Troisdorf were awarded the 2pts and, for a second time, had closed the deficit bringing the scores level to 9-9.


Game 8 - The Stilt Walkers

The eighth game - ‘The Stilt Walkers’ - was a test of balance and pure stamina and played by two competitors on wooden stilts from each team over two return journeys of the course. The course comprised 8 ski gates, 2 seesaws and 2 low hurdles, the latter requiring the competitors to dismount, crouch down to pass under and then mounting the stilts once more to continue. The team completing all four journeys in the faster time would be declared the winners. On the whistle the Landau in der Pfalz team got the better start and led the game throughout. However, it did appear the Troisdorf team would overhaul their rivals on the final return journey as their competitor was faster and more agile on the stilts, but fate dealt them a cruel blow when he knocked the top of the final hurdle from its holdings and was delayed whilst resetting it. Landau in der Pfalz completed the game in 4 minutes 30 seconds and Troisdorf in 4 minutes 43 seconds. The visitors were awarded the 2pts and the scoreboard now showed that they were leading the competition 11-9.


Game 9 - The Australian Kangaroos

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘The Australian Kangaroos’ - was played in unison featuring two competitors from each team dressed in kangaroo costumes and, although simplistic in design, it stood out as having one of the most exciting finishes of the competition. On the whistle, the kangaroos had to move along the course and, at given points, pick up a total of 15 small balls from the ground and then into the pouch of the marsupial. However, this could only be achieved by positioning the balls between the two giant feet of one of the kangaroos and then he flipped the balls upwards to be caught in the pouch by his team-mate. After collecting all 15 balls the kangaroos had to cross a line and then race back to the start. The team completing the course in the faster time would be declared the winners. Although the teams chose totally different methods of picking up the balls - Landau in der Pfalz opting to stand upright and flipping the balls high, whilst Troisdorf opted to kneel down on the ground and use smaller flips - it was a very closely-fought race. Incredibly, both teams reached the turnaround point at the same time and it was just a matter of which team could cross the finish line first. The Troisdorf competitors had a little ‘trick up their sleeve’, and returned to the start walking backwards, thus avoiding any chance of the long feet of the costume tripping them up. This gave them the edge and they took the lead, but their rivals on seeing this tactic, then did the same. However, by now the Troisdorf team had opened enough of a gap and completed the game in 2 minutes 4 seconds followed by Landau in der Pfalz in 2 minutes 6 seconds. The home team were awarded the 2pts and had tied the competition for the third time with the scores at 11-11.


Game 10 - The Wheeled Centipedes

With 4pts up for grab, the tenth and final game - ‘The Wheeled Centipedes’ - would ultimately decide the competition. The game featured a five-man twelve-wheeled go-kart which had to be pushed and steered manually around a zigzagging course through ski gates and under low hurdles. The competitors used their hands to turn the wheels and their feet to guide the axles. The team completing the game in the faster time would not only be declared the winners the game, but of the competition outright. On the whistle, the teams set off together, but gradually the Landau in der Pfalz team opened up a small gap, which they were able to maintain throughout, and crossed the finishing line in 1 minute 16 seconds. Troisdorf despite all their efforts and support from the home crowd crossed the line in 1 minute 23 seconds. The visiting team were awarded the 4pts to win the competition 15-11.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

Series referee Kurt Hauser was unable to attend this heat and Jeux Sans Frontières and sometime Spiel Ohne Grenzen referee Guido Pancaldi stepped in to officiate on his behalf.

For the first time, the credits at the end of this programme officially acknowledged Willi Steinberg as the games designer of the West German Domestic and International programmes.

Returning Teams and Competitors

In attendance at this heat were all the members of the Bardenberg team, the current holders (at the time) of the Jeux Sans Frontières Golden Trophy, who had been specially invited to watch this heat.

Looks Familiar?

The costumes utilised in the ninth game of this heat - ‘The Australian Kangaroos’ - were used again during the first of the two West German Jeux Sans Frontières International Heats this year when the programme was staged at Siegen.

Additional Information

At the start of the programme, presenter Camillo Felgen spoke with the teams and enquired of the Landau in der Pfalz team captain as to his prediction of the result. He calmly stated 14-10 in his team’s favour which was met with some mild jeering from the home side crowd. Moving over to the Troisdorf team captain and posing the same question, he replied by stating that his team would also be winning the contest 14-10. This was met with laughter and loud applause. Only history would show which predicted the correct outcome.

The sixth game in this heat - ‘On Your Head’ - was witness to a refereeing blunder which could have had disastrous repercussions. The Landau in der Pfalz team participated first and actually scored 11 goals. However on two instances, after their fourth and the tenth goals were scored, the balls fell off the ramp during their descent and did not make it to the pen. Only one of these balls (the fourth) was noticed by the officials and replaced by a stagehand. When the official score was announced only 10 goals had been recorded by referee Guido Pancaldi. Fortunately, for the referees and the Landau in der Pfalz team, their rivals were not so adept and had failed to emulate their score and the error had made no difference to the outcome of the game.

There was an intermission between the sixth and seventh games which saw four of the competing teams’ trainers, bürgermeisters and dignitaries competing in a ‘just-for-fun’ game driving children’s mini electric cars. The idea was for them to drive up a small course, around a pole and collect a flag from a tin and return to the start line. For no known reason, the game was accompanied by the music of ‘I Could Have Danced All Night’ written by Frederick Loewe (1901-1988) and Alan Jay Lerner (1918-1986) for the stage musical My Fair Lady in 1956. Although played for fun, referee Guido Pancaldi stated that the Landau in der Pfalz ‘team’ had finished in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th places (a total of 13pts) and the Troisdorf ‘team’ in 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th places (a total of 23pts) and therefore Landau in der Pfalz were the winners. An hilarious moment occurred before this game commenced when presenter Camillo Felgen tripped up on one of the wooden boards and almost fell to the ground. In his own inimitable style he dismissed the matter by stating that ”even as a games’ presenter you have to be careful that you don’t make a fool of oneself”!

At the end of the programme whilst presenter Camillo Felgen was conversing with the losing dignitary of Troisdorf, a helicopter flew past and dropped hundreds of flags, similar to those used in the intermission game, onto the floor of the arena. The reason for this was unclear and unexplained.

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 5

Event Staged: Saturday 25th May 1968
Venue: Freibades Hiesfeld (Hiesfeld Open-Air Swimming Pools),
Hiesfeld, Dinslaken, Nordrhein-Westfalen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 25th May 1968, 4.00-5.15pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Kurt Hauser, Peter Hochrath and Helmut Konrad

Weather Conditions:
Sunny and Warm

Theme: Alles auf See (All at Sea)

Teams: Dinslaken v. Osterholz-Scharmbeck

Team Members included:
Osterholz-Scharmbeck -
Heinrich Hallfeldt (Co-Team Coach), Karl-Wilhelm Herlinghaus (Co-Team Coach), Hans Lucht (Co-Team Coach), Heikel Cordet, Thomas Dürler, Frank Farbien, Hilga Gatsker, Karl Geldinger, Daniel Hofkletter, Walter Maran, Harold Rauchen, Marie Stellien, Anna Verschach, Jorgen von Dursten, Ingrid Wolfe.

Games: Poseidon and the Mermaid, The Aquatic Labyrinth, Log Rolling, The Water Balls, The Seahorse Jousters, The Floating Carpet, Flotsam and Jetsam, The Crocodiles, Swing for the Ring, The Paddle Cycles.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
D 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
O-S 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 4 4
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
D 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
O-S 2 2 4 6 8 8 10 12 16 20

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 O-S • Osterholz-Scharmbeck
 D Dinslaken

20
2

Osterholz-Scharmbeck qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Harrogate, Great Britain:
staged on Wednesday 14th August 1968

The Host Town

Dinslaken, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Dinslaken, a town of around 68,000 inhabitants, is in the Nordrhein-Westfalen state of Germany, bordered to the south-east by Oberhausen and Wesel to the north-west. It is best known for its harness horse racetrack, its wealthy neighbourhoods of Hiesfeld and Eppinghoven and its now closed coal mine in Lohberg. The total area of the town is around 48km2 (18.5mi²), with the maximum distance north-to-south being 8.5km (5¼mi) and east-to-west being 12.4km (7¾ mi), and lies at an altitude of between 20.5m (67ft) and 113m (370ft) above sea level.

 

An aerial view of the harness horse racetrack at Dinslaken

 

The beginning of Dinslaken was simply a ‘motte’, a timber castle with ramparts on a hill surrounded by a moat, which stood on the site of the present town. The name Dinslaken was taken from the number of standing or still ponds called Laken, which were around the town until the 1950s. In the 12th century the town was mentioned in a book of the monastery built next to the lake in the town of Hiesfeld. At the same time, a fort was constructed and enlarged to a castle in 1420, which would later be used as a ‘witches’ prison. In 1273, the town received town rights from Dietrich VII, Count of Cleves (1256-1305), which was extended to market (trading) rights in 1478. In 1540 Dinslaken joined the Hanseatic League, a commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns that dominated trade along the coast of Northern Europe.

On the 1st July 1917, the northern part of the former town of Hiesfeld was incorporated into Dinslaken. The town was further enlarged on 1st January 1975 under the Gebietsreform, the Local Government Reform Act 1974, when the villages of Eppinghoven and Walsum were incorporated.

The Venue

Freibades Hiesfeld (Hiesfeld Open-Air Swimming Pools)

The games in this heat were played in the open-air swimming pools located in the east of Dinslaken in the district of Hiesfeld.

 

The magnificent open-air swimming pool at Hiesfeld, pictured in 1945

 

It was a originally 75m in length and comprised a 50m (164ft) pool accommodating those with the more competitive spirit and a smaller 25m (82ft) shallow pool for non-swimmers and families. The southern end of the pool was surrounded by a wall of locker rooms whilst the lawns on the eastern side were used by lounging bathers to soak up the sun and to enjoy home-made food alfresco. Due to ever-rising costs and the tendency in the mid-1970s for sun-seekers to venture to pastures new on package tours, the pool’s popularity in the summer declined and it was deemed to expensive to maintain in its present form. To that end, the diving boards and all the locker rooms were removed and the southern end of the pool was filled-in and tarmacked over. The pool is now less than half the size of its former glory and is only 25m long in total. It is mainly used as a family-friendly location but unfortunately does not enjoy the popularity as it once did in its former days. The area originally occupied by the filled-in section is utilised as a storage area and overspill car park. A sad end to a once magnificent place of leisure.
 

Modern aerial view of the open-air swimming pool
with southern end now tarmacked over

 

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - Poseidon and the Mermaid

The first game - ‘Poseidon and the Mermaid’ - was the first of three consecutive games to be played in the main pool and featured a competitor from each team standing on a diving board dressed as Poseidon (God of the Sea in Greek mythology) armed with a four-pronged trident! On the whistle, the competitor had to hurl the trident into the pool and then dive in to collect the weapon and then swim the 50m (164ft) to reach his mermaid. They then both swam back to the start of the game. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. Although the game was straightforward and very closely-fought, Osterholz-Scharmbeck took the lead just a few metres from the finish line and won the game in 2 minutes 15 seconds with Dinslaken finishing in 2 minutes 18 seconds. The visitors were awarded the 2pts and were leading 2-0 on the scoreboard.


Game 2 - The Aquatic Labyrinth

The second game - ‘The Aquatic Labyrinth’ - was a simple but ingenious game from the mind of designer Willi Steinberg. It featured a floating labyrinth of pontoon-style bridges laid from one side of the pool to the other and which had to be traversed by two competitors from each team. However, the competitors had to wear blindfolds and shuffle their way around the labyrinth by virtue of remembering the course beforehand and using their feet as guides along the edges. Competitors that fell into the water were able to climb back on board the bridges and continue. At the end of the course, the competitors had to reach above their heads to ring a bell. The time was taken only after the second competitor had sounded the bell. The team with the faster time would be declared the winners. Osterholz-Scharmbeck participated first and completed the course without any major mishap in 2 minutes 21 seconds. The Dinslaken team participated next and although they ended up in the water on more occasions than their rivals, it appeared that they had memorised the course better and both competitors completed the course in 2 minutes 8 seconds. The team were awarded the 2pts (the only points that they would ultimately score) and the scoreboard was level at 2-2.


Game 3 - Log Rolling

The third game - ‘Log Rolling’ - was played in unison over a 48m (157ft 6¾ins) course by two competitors from each team and featured two giant floating rollers and two 55m (180ft 5½ins) lengths of rope. On the whistle, the two competitors had to each pick up one end of a rope, which was attached to the far end of the pool, and then stand on the individual rollers. It was then a straightforward race to pull themselves to the other end of the pool. The Dinslaken team got off to the better start and held the lead throughout the game. The visiting duo suffered a mishap 5m from the finish line when their lead competitor lost his footing and slipped from his roller. It now appeared that the home team had the game sewn up. However in his haste, the Dinslaken lead competitor dismounted his roller 10cm too early, something which triggered his team-mate to do the same. The referees ruled that they both had to get back on the rollers and complete the game. The Osterholz-Scharmbeck team, witnessing their error, hastily recomposed themselves and headed towards the finishing line, but a second mishap befell the team with both competitors tumbling into the pool. It was then a mad scramble as to which of the two teams could get recompose themselves the fastest and complete the game. Unfortunately for the home crowd, victory was snatched from their grasp after their competitors failed to acquire their balance ahead of their rivals and allowed Osterholz-Scharmbeck to cross the line in 1 minute 37 seconds and dive into the pool. The home team competitors finally crossed the line in 1 minute 49 seconds and raised their arms indicating that they believed they had still won the game. However, referee Kurt Hauser announced that all the rules had been adhered to and the times were upheld. Osterholz-Scharmbeck were awarded the 2pts and were once again leading the competition by 4-2, a position that they would now maintain throughout the programme.


Game 4 - The Water Balls

The fourth game - ‘The Water Balls’ - was played in the smaller 25m (82ft) shallow pool and featured four competitors standing in the pool wearing large polystyrene costumes in the shape of hemispheres. On the whistle, the assistant referees released 12 inflated beach balls into the pool and the competitors had to work as a team to entrap them and transport them to the other side of the pool. Osterholz-Scharmbeck participated first and, although the game was designed to have a duration of three minutes, completed the game in just 50 seconds. The Dinslaken team participated next and it appeared at one point that they may in fact emulate the visitors’ time. However, their technique was not up to the standard of the Osterholz-Scharmbeck team and, instead of encircling the balls as did their rivals, they held an almost perfect straight line and, as they picked up speed, this allowed a rogue ball to escape from their grasp. With 43 seconds already registered on the clock, there was very little time to recompose themselves and, with more balls escaping, the team cut their losses and transported the remaining 8 balls to the pool’s edge in a time of 1 minute 26 seconds. Osterholz-Scharmbeck were awarded the 2pts and had increased their lead to 6-2.


Game 5 - The Seahorse Jousters

The programme returned to the main pool for the fifth game - ‘The Seahorse Jousters’ - which was played over the best of three rounds and had a duration of 5 minutes. It was played above the pool and featured a player from each team armed with a very long lance sitting on the back of a large seahorse which was connected to a trapeze. On the whistle, the opposing competitors had to do battle in a jousting competition attempting to hit a small target at the front of the creature. This then released a lever which unseated his opponent, dropping him into the pool below and scoring 1pt on the game. When this occurred, a second competitor climbed a rope and onto the trapeze whilst a stagehand fixed the lever back into place. The team with the greater points score would be declared the winners. The game began and within 14 seconds the first competitor to drop into the water was from Dinslaken and Osterholz-Scharmbeck were leading 1-0 on the game. There was then a delay of 1 minute 49 seconds (the clock continuing to tick by) whilst the game was reset and it appeared that there was some malfunction with the Dinslaken seahorse lever. Despite this, the second round went ahead and Osterholz-Scharmbeck increased their lead to 2-0 after 2 minutes 51 seconds and in theory had won the game. The stagehand tried to reset the equipment once more, but it had now become apparent that the malfunction had become permanent. The clock ticked by for another 2 minutes 9 seconds whilst the stagehand frantically tried to rectify the problem. However, this was to no avail and the elapsed time had reached 5 minutes and the final whistle was blown. Osterholz-Scharmbeck were declared the winners and awarded their third consecutive 2pts and had now increased their lead to 8-2 on the scoreboard.


Game 6 - The Floating Carpet

The sixth game - ‘The Floating Carpet’ - was the second to be played in the smaller pool and was a very straightforward in its design. It featured a 15m netted carpet which had been stretched and anchored to both ends of the 25m pool by wires. On the poolside, there were four competitors from each team with an inflatable paddling pool filled with 40 balls. On the whistle, the teams had to jump into the pool and get onto the carpet, which inevitably would sink under the weight of the competitors, and then walk along its length ensuring all the balls remained inside the inflated pool. At the other end of the carpet, the competitors had to get into the pool and walk the remaining 10m to the other side. A penalty of 5 seconds would be incurred for each ball not transported to the other side and both teams had to remain on the carpet when moving forward. The team with the overall faster time would be declared the winners. Although Dinslaken got off to the better start, Osterholz-Scharmbeck overcome the deficit and overtook them halfway over the carpet, finishing in a time of 1 minute 12 seconds. However, the assistant referees announced that whilst both teams had brought all the balls back intact, they had both breached the rules and had traversed part of the course off the carpet. Referee Kurt Hauser declared that both teams were disqualified and the game would not be counted and awarded both teams 0pts. The scores remained 8-2 in Osterholz-Scharmbeck’s favour.


Game 7 - Flotsam and Jetsam

The seventh game - ‘Flotsam and Jetsam’ - witnessed the Dinslaken team manager playing the first Joker of the programme and was played over four rounds with each round taking place over a distance of 50m. On the whistle, a competitor from each team had to dive from the springboard and swim the length of the pool. When he reached his goal, assistant referee Helmut Konrad signalled for the next competitor to begin by lowering a flag. The second competitor, on the poolside, had a football attached to each of his arms and feet and he had to swim the same length. The third round saw the toughest of all of the rounds with two competitors from each team, already in the pool, attached by hands and feet to large floating platforms. In order to move up the pool, they had to adopt a snake-like propulsion, pulling the front platform back whilst pulling the rear platform forward with their feet and then kicking back with their feet to gain forward motion and repeating the process. The fourth round saw a lone competitor in a wooden barrel paddling the length of the pool with his arms, avoiding splashing water into the open top and sinking. The game began with a closely-fought race but by the third round it was clear as to the outcome of the game. The visiting team had opened up an unassailable lead and in fact finished all four rounds before Dinslaken had completed their third. The result was confirmed and Osterholz-Scharmbeck had completed the game in 5 minutes 11 seconds and had nullified the home team’s Joker and were awarded the 2pts. With the scores standing at 10-2 in Osterholz-Scharmbeck’s favour, the best the home team could hope for now was a 10-10 draw, but to achieve this they would need to win the remaining three games, one of which would be against their rival’s Joker!


Game 8 - The Crocodiles

The eighth game - ‘The Crocodiles’ - was the third and final game to be played in the smaller of the two polls and featured two opposing crocodiles with open mouths and sharp teeth. In the pool, stagehands released 40 balloons (20 light-coloured and 20 dark-coloured) and on the whistle, the crocodiles moved from the pool’s edge and had to burst their designated coloured balloons. Dinslaken were allotted the darker colour whilst Osterholz-Scharmbeck were given the lighter colour of the two. The team completing the task in the faster time would be declared the winners. A straightforward game saw the visiting team win in 2 minutes 12 seconds. Osterholz-Scharmbeck were awarded another 2pts and with the scores at 12-2 in their favour, the final outcome of the programme had in theory been confirmed. With an 10pt deficit and only 6pts available, Dinslaken had had their fate finally sealed.


Game 9 - Swing for the Ring

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘Swing for the Ring’ - had a duration of four minutes and saw the Osterholz-Scharmbeck Joker being played. The game featured two competitors standing on a large swing above the pool. On one side of the game were 6 inflatable rings hanging from hooks and on the other side were the same number of empty hooks. On the whistle, the competitors had to get the swing in motion in order to transport the rings, one at a time, from one side to the other. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. The Dinslaken pair participated first and although they grabbed their first ring in 39 seconds, they failed to keep the swing moving horizontally and were swinging in all directions and unable to hang the ring on the other side until 1 minute 58 seconds had elapsed. A second ring was grabbed immediately but suffered the same fate with their control of the swing, taking another minute to hook it on the other side. After knocking the third ring into the pool, the team successfully grabbed their next ring in 3 minutes 32 seconds and deposited it on the other side immediately. However, this was to be their last score as one of the competitors lost his footing on the swing, falling into the pool with 13 seconds of play remaining and the official score was confirmed as 3 rings. Whilst the game’s equipment was reset and the Osterholz-Scharmbeck team got into position, viewers at home were treated to a spectacular panoramic view of the magnificent pools. With the visitors in position, the second heat began and they grabbed their first ring after 34 seconds and, unlike their opposition, they kept the swing under control and deposited the ring on the other side after just 40 seconds with their second ring after 52 seconds. With their third and fourth rings being deposited on hooks after 1 minute 4 seconds and 1 minute 17 seconds, respectively, the game was over in theory, but the team carried on and collected all 6 rings in 2 minutes 15 seconds. With the Joker played and 4pts awarded, Osterholz-Scharmbeck were now leading 16-2 on the scoreboard.


Game 10 - The Paddle Cycles

The tenth and final game - ‘The Paddle Cycles’ - was, due to its length, obviously designed to be used as a deciding game should the scores have been level or closer than they were before the game begun. In the pool, a competitor from each team had to steer and pedal a quad-bike, with two large paddle wheels at the rear and two thinner wheels at the front, up a 50m course. On reaching the end of the course, he had to park the vehicle in a ‘garage’ and, in doing so, break through a ribbon across its entrance. Once completed, the competitor had to repeat the course, pedalling in reverse and parking the quad-bike in a second garage to finish the game. On the whistle, the Dinslaken competitor took the lead, but it could be seen that he was struggling somewhat as the game progressed. Nevertheless, he reached the first garage ahead of his rival. The return leg however was a different story and, whilst the Osterholz-Scharmbeck competitor kept a straight course, the Dinslaken competitor’s reversing skills were shown to be lacking as he headed towards the side of the pool. The game eventually ended with Osterholz-Scharmbeck completing the game in 3 minutes 56 seconds and being awarded the final 4pts of the competition, bringing the final score to 20-2 in the visitors’ favour.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

Both of the assistant referees in this heat, originally donning tracksuits at the start of the programme, judged many of the games in the pool itself, attired in male swimwear apt for the era of this broadcast.

At the end of this heat whilst the end credits began to roll, members of the competing teams grabbed hold of presenter Camillo Felgen and threw him into the pool complete with his trademark beige suit. Camillo could then be seen being mobbed by members of the Osnabrück Neptune Mermaids whilst the on-site brass band played Happy Days are Here Again written in 1929 by Milton Ager (1893-1979) and Jack Yellen (1892-1991) and which featured as the concluding song in the 1930 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film Chasing Rainbows starring Bessie Love (1898-1986) and Charles King (1895-1957).

Additional Information

During his opening introductions, presenter Camillo Felgen stated to the crowd that this was the fourth year of the programme and the 40th transmission under the Spiel Ohne Grenzen banner being broadcast on West German television. This figure included this programme and all International and Domestic programmes since 1965 and comprised 9 JSF 1965 + 13 JSF 1966 + 13 (6 SOG + 7 JSF) 1967 + 5 SOG 1968.

As had been the norm this series, there was an intermission during the programme between the fifth and sixth games. With a swimming pool setting, it was only natural that there should be an aquatic display and this was given by the Osnabrück Neptune Nixe (Osnabrück Neptune Mermaids) in a routine lasting 4 minutes 35 seconds, choreographed by Asse Brinckmann. The sixteen swimmers had been booked to travel behind the Iron Curtain to appear in Moscow later in the summer.

The sixth game in this heat ended with both teams being disqualified for breaching the rules and as a result, no points were awarded to either team. This was somewhat of a first in a Jeux Sans Frontières related programme, whereby no team scored anything at all. Despite this, the heat produced the fourth-biggest winning victory in a Spiel Ohne Grenzen Domestic Heat with the home team defeating their rivals by 18pts. The record of a 24pts clear victory was set earlier in this series by Inzell against Schongau with the home team winning every game in the process.

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

D

Spiel Ohne Grenzen 1968

Heat 6

Event Staged: Saturday 8th June 1968
Venue: Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Stadion (Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Stadium),
Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen, West Germany

Transmission:
ARD-WDR (D):
Saturday 8th June 1968, 4.05-5.20pm (Live)
Not transmitted in Great Britain

Referees on Duty:
Hans Ebensberger, Kurt Hauser and Peter Hochrath

Weather Conditions:
Overcast with a Moderate Breeze

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Theme: Freizeitaktivitäten (Leisure Activities)

Teams: Herford v. Siegen

Team Members included:
Herford -
Karl-Heinz Reese (Team Manager), Ernst Witte (Co-Team Trainer), Heinz Wolf (Co-Team Trainer), Manfred Becella, Hans-Jürgen Berg, Hans-Dieter Bessel, Dietrich Bräucker, Jurgen Dammann, Wolf-Dieter Deter, Bernd Fischer, Eduard Fonfahra, Wolfgang Franke, Torsten Führer, Bernd-Roland Gottschling, Hans Heit, Winfried Held, Rolf Hoock, Paul Kaiser, Friedhelm Kirchhoff, Horst Klann, Detlef Klemme, Florian Konenko, Jürgen Kott, Bernd Kupczyk, Birger Kremeyer, Wilfried Lehrich, Jens Lichtwark, Manfred Lübbing, Karl-Heinz Menzel, Bernd Michalski, Hans Müller, Hans-Jürgen Müller, Hans-Dieter Neumann, Jürgen Neumann, Peter Plau, Günter Rabe, Manfred Rieso, Klaus Rogalski, Dieter Röhe, Horst Sass, Hans-Joachim Schröder, Manfred Schröder, Dieter Schuck, Dietmar Spilker, Hartmut Strauch, Rainer Sundermann, Werner Tuloweit, Horst Urbanczyk, Reinhard Werner, Manfred Wundrack;
Siegen - Hr. Lingt (Team Trainer), Günther Erichs, Rolf Issler, Gert Stein.

Games (Official Titles): The Locomotives, Somersaults and Ninepins, The Rolling Game, With Bag and Luggage, Dachshund Rodeo, The Curved Vehicles, The Stepped Pyramid, Four on a Ring, The Duel, Spring-Core Bounce.

Game Results and Standings

Games

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points Scored
(Joker Games shown in red)
H 1 0 2 0 1 2 4 0 0 0
S 1 4 0 2 1 0 0 2 2 4
Running Totals
(Leading teams shown in red)
H 1 1 3 3 4 6 10 10 10 10
S 1 5 5 7 8 8 8 10 12 16

Result

 Team

Points

Final Scoreboard

1st
2nd

 S • Siegen
 H Herford

16
10

Siegen qualified for Jeux Sans Frontières at Siegen, West Germany:
staged on Wednesday 28th August 1968

The Host Town

Herford, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Herford is a town of around 66,000 inhabitants located in the valley of the Wiehen Hills and the Teutoberg Forest, 15km (9½mi) north-east of Bielefeld, 46km (28½mi) east of Osnabrück and midway between Dortmund and Hannover, which are each about 100km (62mi) away. It is built on the banks of the Rivers Werre and Aa which converge in the centre of the town and the highest point is the Dornberg at 240m (787ft) in the Schwarzenmoor district.

 

The Goose Fountain created by Bruno Buschmann in the Gänsemarkt

 

The town was founded in 789 by Charlemagne in order to guard a ford crossing the narrow Werre river. In late medieval times, it was a member of the Hanseatic league, a commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns that dominated trade along the coast of Northern Europe. This status was lost after the Peace of Westphalia (1648), a series of treaties which ended the Thirty Years’ War (1618-48) in the Holy Roman Empire and the Eighty Years’ War (1568-1648) between Spain and the Dutch Republic, when the town was annexed by Brandenburg-Prussia.

Herford is renowned for its fountains with many sited around the town. The Hanse fountain in the pedestrianised area of Lübberstraße and Berlinstaße recalls the town’s membership of the Hanseatic league, with the bronze statue designed in the form of a Hanseatic cog (a boat built of oak). On the Neuer Markt is a Renaissance fountain constructed in 1599 from sandstone and representing the city’s wells. In Gehrenberg at the confluence of the Brüderstraße is a fountain with moving figures representing Herford’s Mutter Grün selling haberdashery from her cart, Oscar the trumpeter who played for the locals in return for the price of a beer and the town’s children are enjoying themselves inside a carousel space rocket. On Bäckerstraße (Baker Street) there is a fountain in the shape of a bronze figure representing a bold, sassy and yet innocent-looking rascal created by sculptor Marianne Bleeke-Ehret. The most extravagant of them all however, is the Goose fountain created by Bruno Buschmann in the Gänsemarkt (goose market) constructed in 1978. Consisting of a limestone plinth weighing around 1000kg (2200lb), it stands at 3.2m (10½ft) high and is graced by eight cast bronze geese. In 1990, twelve years after its inauguration, two of the geese’s heads had to be replaced after they mysteriously vanished!

The Venue

Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Stadion (Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Stadium)

The games at this heat were staged at the local football stadium named after German gymnast educator and nationalist Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778-1852) and which currently has a capacity of 18,400 spectators. Jahn is commonly referred to as Turnvater Jahn (roughly translated as ‘father of gymnastics’), because after seeing the humiliation of this native land by Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), he conceived the idea of restoring the spirits of his countrymen by the development of their physical and moral powers through the practice of gymnastics.

 

Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Stadion, home of local teams SC Herford
and HSV Borussia Friedenstal

 

The stadium is home to SC Herford (Sportclub Herford) which currently play in the Fußball-Landesliga (The Football State League) and women’s team Herforder Sportverein (HSV) Borussia Friedenstal which currently play in the 2. Fußball-Bundesliga (Frauen) (2nd Women's Football Bundesliga).

The Games in Detail

Game 1 - The Locomotives

The first game - ‘The Locomotives’ - was played in unison, had a duration of three minutes and featured three competitors from each team and a large train locomotive which had a large roller at its rear and three axles at the front, with the front pair of wheels being used to steer. On the whistle, a stagehand dropped a smoke canister into the funnel of the locomotive and then the three competitors had to climb on to the rear roller and move the locomotive to one end of the course by walking backwards. After reaching the end, they had to turn the locomotive around and then follow a zigzagging course whilst negotiating a series of ski poles and gates. Halfway up the course, the paths of the two teams crossed and one of their competitors had to jump off the roller and run to a set of points in order to set the signal in their favour. The team achieving this first were permitted to go ahead whilst the other team had to wait until the track was clear before continuing. This was repeated at the turnaround point at the top end of the course and again at the crossover point on the return journey. It was then a straight race through the slalom to the finish line. Any ski poles touched or knocked down incurred penalties and the team completing the course in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. The game began with the Siegen team taking the lead which was to continue throughout except for the final few metres, when Herford overtook their rivals to finish the game in first place. When the result was announced, referee Kurt Hauser stated that Herford had completed the game in 3 minutes 42 seconds and Siegen in 3 minutes 50 seconds. However, he then continued by stating that neither team had completed the course in the allotted time and declared the game a draw and this was met with a hail of jeering from the home crowd. Both teams were awarded 1pt each and the first running scoreboard showed both teams level at 1-1. An interesting point to note on this game was that although the game was declared a draw, at no point did the referees attempt to stop the game at the official 3 minute mark, instead opting to play the game to a finish and then declaring it a draw. Interesting!


Game 2 - Somersaults and Ninepins

The second game - ‘Somersaults and Ninepins’ - was also played in unison and saw the Siegen team playing their Joker. The game featured nine caricatured skittles at the far end of the course and at the other end there were two competitors from each team. On the whistle, the competitors had to position themselves over each other in a way that they could grab hold of each others ankles and then somersault forward up the course. As they reached the end of the course they had to knock down one of the nine skittles. They then ran back to the start to repeat the game. With there being nine pins, it was a straight race, with the first team knocking down five of the pins being declared the winners. It was clear from the outset as to the outcome of the game, with Siegen storming ahead immediately and knocking down five pins in 1 minute 43 seconds. The team were awarded 4pts with the Joker and they were now leading 5-1 on the scoreboard.


Game 3 - The Rolling Game

The third game - ‘The Rolling Game’ - was an interesting game to watch and featured a set of five 2m (6ft 6½ins) length tubes with a diameter of 80cm (2ft 7½ins) separated by wooden boards. The tubes were not fixed and could be moved back and forth along the length of their sections on small rails. Each of the boards had a large hole located at one end but at the opposite end to that of its predecessor. On the whistle, a competitor climbed into the first tube and then rolled it along the rail to the opposite end so as to line up with the hole enabling him to climb into the tube in the next section. He then had to roll the second tube to the opposite end to line up with the next hole and the process repeated. Once the competitor had completed his fifth tube roll, he was able to exit the equipment and collect a maximum of four water-filled balloons. He then had to transport all the balloons to the start of the game, utilising the rollers in the same manner as his outward journey, and place them in a wooden cage. He then had to repeat the entire game for a second run. A bonus of 10 seconds was awarded for each balloon collected intact and the team completing both runs in the faster overall time would be declared the winners. The Siegen competitor participated first and completed the course in 2 minutes 45 seconds and transported 6 balloons intact. With a bonus of 1 minute (6 x 10secs) awarded, the overall time for Siegen was 1 minute 45 seconds. The home team competitor participated next and completed the game in a much faster time of 2 minutes 8 seconds and with 7 balloons collected, the overall time for the Herford team was just 58 seconds. Herford were awarded 2pts and the scoreboard was updated and showed that Siegen were leading by 5-3.


Game 4 - With Bag and Luggage

The fourth game - ‘With Bag and Luggage’ - was played in unison and featured two competitors from each team transporting luggage through an obstacle course. On the whistle, the teams had to collect 22 pieces of luggage - comprising suitcases, rolled mattresses, corn sacks, cushions and boxes - and then open a large cage via an inwardly-opening door. Whilst one of the competitors went inside to stack the luggage, his team-mate stayed outside and passed the items to him. Once the luggage was inside, the second competitor got in the cage and closed the door. The first competitor in the cage then had to open another inwardly-opening door at the other end and climb into an adjoining cage, whilst his team-mate passed the luggage to him and repeated the game. Once both competitors and luggage were inside the second cage and the door was closed, a third door had to be opened in the same manner as the second and the competitors exited the cage with the luggage. They then had to carry the luggage up a flight of 11 steps and toss the items over a wire fence and then jump to the ground. The final task was to put all the 22 items into a third cage and get inside and close the door behind them. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. A straightforward game saw Siegen complete the game in 4 minutes 30 seconds and Herford in 4 minutes 44 seconds. Kurt Hauser made one of his bloopers and announced that Herford had won the game in 4 minutes 30 seconds and awarded them the 2pts. The home crowd went wild, but were suddenly quietened when assistant referee Hans Ebensberger nudged Hauser and stated that it was Siegen that had won the game. Hauser looked over his shoulder to see which of the cages was which and rescinded his statement and declared Siegen as the winners. The scoreboard now showed that Siegen were leading by 7-3.


Game 5 - Dachshund Rodeo

The fifth game - ‘Dachshund Rodeo’ - had a duration of 1 minute 30 seconds and featured a large dachshund measuring 2.5m (8ft 2½in) in length, 1m (3ft 3¼in) in height and 0.7cm (2ft 3½in) in width. Before the start of the game, the dachshund was positioned on a pair of wooden stands and after the competitor was assisted on to the dachshund’s back, two opposition team members climbed under and inside the dachshund. With the opposition taking the weight of the dachshund, the wooden stands were removed and the whistle blown. The opposition then had to follow a white line to a marked area and then had to unseat the competitor by using the classic bucking bronco method. The team lasting the greater length of time before being unseated would be declared the winners. The Siegen team participated first and although their competitor was not unseated, the dog was brought to the ground by being unbalanced by the weight of the competitor after 1 minute 2 seconds. The Herford team participated next and, although their opposition were more aggressive in their style, they were also unable to unseat the competitor and were also brought to the ground after 55 seconds. With neither team completing the game to its correct conclusion, the game was declared a draw and both teams were awarded 1pt each. The scoreboard was updated to show that the score was 8-4 in Siegen’s favour.


Game 6 - The Curved Vehicles

The sixth game - ‘The Curved Vehicles’ - featured two competitors from each team and a six-wheeled cart measuring 3m (9ft 10½ins) long and 1m (3ft 3¼in) wide. The middle set of wheels was larger than the front and back pair and this resulted in it acting like a fulcrum with one end of the cart always being off the ground. On the cart, above the middle axle, was a set of pedals and a bicycle seat on which sat a cyclist. On the whistle, the cyclist had to pedal the cart around the course, assisted by his team-mate who weighted down the ends of the cart as they moved around an obstacle course of ski poles. A penalty of 10 seconds was incurred for any poles knocked down. The team with the faster overall time would be declared the winners. A straightforward race saw Siegen complete the game in 1 minute 54 seconds with Herford finishing one second behind in 1 minute 55 seconds. However, whilst Herford had incurred no penalties, the Siegen team incurred three penalties (3 x 10secs) giving them an overall time of 2 minutes 24 seconds. The home crowd erupted and Herford were awarded the 2pts, bringing the scores to 8-6 in Siegen’s favour.


Game 7 - The Stepped Pyramid

The seventh game -‘The Stepped Pyramid’ - was played in unison over a duration of four minutes and saw the Herford team captain presenting the team’s Joker for play. The game featured four competitors from each team and a large stepped pyramid comprising three 2m (6ft 6½ins) high steps. On either side of the pyramid there was a chute leading into a pool and on the top step there were measuring cylinders on weighing scales. On the whistle, the teams had to collect water from the pool in buckets and climb to the top of the pyramid and empty any contents into the Perspex cylinders. They then descended the pyramid via the chute and ultimately into the pool. After climbing out of the pool, they then repeated the game. The team collecting the greater amount of water would be declared the winners. After 1 minute 30 seconds play, a long camera shot showed that the Herford team were in the lead. However the Siegen team began to close the gap and after the four minutes of play the Herford team had collected 89.5kg (197lbs 5oz) of water, whilst their rivals had collected 86kg (189lbs 9½oz) of water. The home team had won their Joker game and were awarded 4pts. The scoreboard showed that the home team were now in the lead for the first time in the competition, with the score being 10-8 in their favour.


Game 8 - Four on a Ring

The eighth game - ‘Four on a Ring’ - featured four competitors from each team and a large 2m (6ft 6½ins) diameter netted ring which was mounted onto a four-wheeled frame. Around the circumference of the ring were four large handles into which the competitors had to place their two feet after getting into the press-up position. On the whistle, the competitors had to work as a team and had two minutes to pull the ring around the course with their hands in order to collect 20 balls located on the ground. The team collecting all the balls in the faster time would be declared the winners. The visiting team of Siegen participated first and collected all the balls in 1 minute 25 seconds. Herford participated next and after a few mishaps completed the game in 1 minute 39 seconds. Siegen were awarded the 2pts and the competition was level with the scores at 10-10.


Game 9 - The Duel

The ninth and penultimate game - ‘The Duel’ - was played in unison and featured four competitors underneath a large musk ox costume which had been mounted on a set of wheels at the front. On the whistle, the competitors, who could only see through a gap in the front of the horns of the costume, had to run up the course to a given point and meet another musk ox mounted on wheels. They then had to turn the second ox around using their body weight and direction so that the two oxen were face-to-face. They then had to ‘do battle’ and push the wheeled ox up the course and through a gate into a corral. The team completing the game in the faster time would be declared the winners. A straightforward game saw Siegen complete the task in 1 minute 28 seconds and they were awarded the 2pts. The scoreboard showed that Siegen were once again in the lead with the score at 12-10.


Game 10 - Spring-Core Bounce

The tenth and final game - ‘Spring-Core Bounce’ - featured four competitors from each team standing on contraptions built around large springs which were attached to the corners of a 2m x 3m (9ft 10½ins x 6ft 6½ins) tarpaulin in the middle of which were 10 balls. On the whistle, the competitors had to bounce up the 25m (82ft) course in a pogo-stick fashion without losing any of the balls which would each incur a penalty of 20 seconds. As the game began, it appeared that it was going to be a very closely fought straight race without incident, but things were to about to change. As the teams approached the halfway mark and with Herford leading, the Siegen team lost 4 of their balls. The home crowd began to go wild as the chance of victory was now in their grasp, but unperturbed by the loss, the Siegen team continued on and crossed the line in 1 minute 46 seconds. With Herford just 3m behind and 15 seconds from crossing the finish line, it appeared victory was going to be theirs. However, the front competitors jumped too far forward, causing the tarpaulin to become taut and resulted in all the balls being tossed in the air and 5 of the balls being lost over the side. The Siegen team, who had been watching with bated breath, jumped in the air knowing that the penalties incurred by them had now been nullified by the Herford team. Referee Kurt Hauser declared that Siegen had incurred 1 minute 20 seconds (4 x 20 seconds) in penalties, giving them a total time of 3 minutes 6 seconds. Herford had finished the game in 2 minutes 1 second and had incurred 1 minute 40 seconds (5 x 20 seconds) in penalties, giving them a total of 3 minutes 41 seconds. Siegen were awarded the 4pts and the scoreboard showed that they had won the contest by 16-10.

Presenters, Officials and Production Team

At the end of this heat, presenter Camillo Felgen sped away in a police car whilst the marching band of The Royal Scots Greys played their instrumental version of Cliff Richard’s Congratulations. The song, which had been the United Kingdom’s entry at the Eurovision Song Contest on 6th April, had been penned by Bill Martin and Phil Coulter and had finished in 2nd place to the Spanish entry La, La, La, La… by just 1pt.

Additional Information

This programme opened with the pomp and circumstance of a local brass band signifying the arrival of presenter Camillo Felgen and the teams to the 15,000-strong crowd. Whilst the Siegen team, along with pet dog mascot Ricco, joined Camillo on a small train running along a track specially laid out in the stadium for the contest, the home team of Herford arrived in the stadium on foot. One of the pieces of music accompanying them was the polyphonic motet prelude to 'Te Deum' in D Major composed by Marc-Antoine Charpentier (1603-1704). It would have been easily recognised by European viewers, as it was adopted by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) / Union Européenne de Radio-Télévision (UER) in 1950 as the Eurovision theme.

In the souvenir programme for this event, the idea of the first game - ‘The Locomotives’ - was for the teams to steer the vehicle around a course bursting balloons. However on the day of transmission, the balloons were replaced with the sets of points.

The intermission in this heat occurred during the sixth and seventh games and featured a display lasting 5 minutes 9 seconds by the marching band of The Royal Scots Greys, a cavalry regiment of the British Army since 1707. Based in Germany on several occasions throughout their history, they returned for a final time in 1964 after spending time in Aden protecting the Yemen border. This was return was to last until 1969 after which time they returned to Scotland. However in 1971, three years after this programme was originally transmitted, the regiment was amalgamated with the 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards) to form The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys).

At the time of this transmission, it appeared that the venue for the West German heat of Jeux Sans Frontières had not been finalised. At the end of each of the other five Domestic heats, presenter Camillo Felgen clearly stated the respective International venue at which the winning team would be competing. However, in this heat all he would state was that the winners would be competing in West Germany. It was also clear that the French International heat had been cancelled at this point when Camillo stated that this programme saw the end of the national heats and the next competition would be on the 3rd July in Zofingen, Switzerland.

There was a change to the order of the games described in the souvenir programme of the event. The fourth game played was originally to have been the eighth game, and this resulted in the next four games being played one game later than shown in the publication.

Made in B/W • This programme exists in German archives

 

JSFnetGB Series Guide pages researched by
Alan Hayes, David Hamilton, Neil Storer, Christos Moustakas, Philippe Minet,
Sébastien Dias, Ischa Bijl, Paul Leaver and JSFnet Websites